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Advice for Beginning Older Adult Skiers - Page 2

post #31 of 56
Thread Starter 
I have Lisa's book, "Open Your Heart with Winter Fitness" and it has a
section devoted to balance training. Have also just ordered a bosu and accompanying dvd. I have a feeling that gives me a lot of info on balance training. But for the people who don't have as much info, would it be possible to post the article on epic, Lisa??
post #32 of 56
YIPPEE! A reason to go to the Post office. BTW, the photos are by are very own Snotrainer, si this is a truly "epic" article.
post #33 of 56

Excellent article!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie View Post
With any luck, my article on fitness for the boomer-aged instructor will finally appear in this Fall's edition of TPS. As someone who started in her 40s, I would urge anyone who wants to do the same to start a regular balance training program ASAP.
I just read your TPS article and I must thank and congradulate you for writing a very well writen and informative article. It's not just for boomers. The exercises and descriptions of the intent of them are eye opening, loaded with new information to me. This is great stuff for all serious skiers.
In paragraph 6 you mention a reference Martin Bell made about glucosamine. There are blends of glucosamine containing MSM (Methyl Sulfonyl Methane). Rather than taking daily (and perhaps excessive) doses of NSAIDS I take MSM supplements. They provide me with quick, long lasting relief from joint pain and I've taken them daily for long periods of time. Another product I use daily is DMSO (Dimethyl Sulfoxide). It's the same compound as MSM only in lquid form. I use it as a liniment directly on my arthritic right shoulder, Neck, right Knee (patellar tendonitis) and left ankle (posterial tibial tendonitis). The only drawback of MSM is the pills are large and difficult for me to swallow and DMSO causes me some minor skin irritation when I apply it heavily. DMSO makes my breath smell a little cheezy, garlic, oyster. I use it before I shower and brush my teeth. No one has complained (particularly my wife) about any breath issues. Any one with cronic pain and joint related discomfort should research these two products as an alternative to long term use of pain relievers.
post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogonjon View Post
I just read your TPS article and I must thank and congradulate you for writing a very well writen and informative article. It's not just for boomers. The exercises and descriptions of the intent of them are eye opening, loaded with new information to me. This is great stuff for all serious skiers.
In paragraph 6 you mention a reference Martin Bell made about glucosamine. There are blends of glucosamine containing MSM (Methyl Sulfonyl Methane). Rather than taking daily (and perhaps excessive) doses of NSAIDS I take MSM supplements. They provide me with quick, long lasting relief from joint pain and I've taken them daily for long periods of time. Another product I use daily is DMSO (Dimethyl Sulfoxide). It's the same compound as MSM only in lquid form. I use it as a liniment directly on my arthritic right shoulder, Neck, right Knee (patellar tendonitis) and left ankle (posterial tibial tendonitis). The only drawback of MSM is the pills are large and difficult for me to swallow and DMSO causes me some minor skin irritation when I apply it heavily. DMSO makes my breath smell a little cheezy, garlic, oyster. I use it before I shower and brush my teeth. No one has complained (particularly my wife) about any breath issues. Any one with cronic pain and joint related discomfort should research these two products as an alternative to long term use of pain relievers.
Dogonjon, I have used MSM also for the past couple years. I get it in Bulk from a manufacturer in Calif. 1 tsp=4000mgm. Disolves in warm water. Very easy to use. I don't have the retail name with me but pm me and I will send to you if you are interested. Many years ago there was a lot of negative press on dmso, not to mention the smell of ?beets? by those who used it. Has that changed? I also use glucosamine and condroitin as a supplement for those aging joints. Tryin to keep young!
Mark
post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgmc View Post
I have Lisa's book, "Open Your Heart with Winter Fitness" and it has a
section devoted to balance training. Have also just ordered a bosu and accompanying dvd. I have a feeling that gives me a lot of info on balance training. But for the people who don't have as much info, would it be possible to post the article on epic, Lisa??
Thanks! Not sure how I missed this reply. The TPS articles are never online, but I do have some stuff in the Supporter's Lounge, and various other sections of Health and Fitness. Also, there is a topic in this forum entitled Ski Fitness Fundamentals. TPS does not allow me to publish these articles anywhere else, but in a few days, I will write a summary.

Quote:
I just read your TPS article and I must thank and congradulate you for writing a very well writen and informative article. It's not just for boomers. The exercises and descriptions of the intent of them are eye opening, loaded with new information to me. This is great stuff for all serious skiers.
post #36 of 56
Actually, my orthopedic surgeon told me that the latest studies don't show glucosamine doing a bit of good. I took it for at least 4 months and couldn't see a difference at all in the way my wrists were feeling. And it's so expensive I stopped using it.
post #37 of 56

....

Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
if you ski the Tahoe area, Mt Rose has an exceptional "seniors" skiing group, along with off-season activities.
Ahem...well mgmc, RIskier....IMO...at 53(=me) you don't have to be bussed in from the senior citizens house.... If that sounds a little on the "never trust anyone over 30" side, I guess I do plead guilty to a certain extent!;-)
But, having learned a lot from skiing in back of really good women instructors on the steeps...I think attending these "Women Only" group things is the best thing out there....long overdue I think.

$.01
Steve
post #38 of 56
Thread Starter 

Lessons - Seniors vs. Women

Quote:
Originally Posted by HaveSkisWillClimb View Post
Ahem...well mgmc, RIskier....IMO...at 53(=me) you don't have to be bussed in from the senior citizens house.... If that sounds a little on the "never trust anyone over 30" side, I guess I do plead guilty to a certain extent!;-)
But, having learned a lot from skiing in back of really good women instructors on the steeps...I think attending these "Women Only" group things is the best thing out there....long overdue I think.

$.01
Steve
Thanks for your $.01 Steve; I'm open to whatever works but at age 51, I was surprised to qualify for a Seniors program. Mt. Rose has one that offers lessons 3x/week (M,W,F) for FREE! Unfortunately I live about 5 hours away.....

I am currently looking into all forms of camps (women's camps definitely!!) and also the six day ski week at Taos. Also trying to arrange for some privates.
post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgmc View Post

... the six day ski week at Taos.
Oct 2, 2007

Hi MgMc:

You can't go wrong with an Ernie Blake Ski School Ski Week. Ernie Blake, a German immigrant, was the founder of Taos and was a great person, ski coach and skier, in the above order. As an added bonus, Taos, I believe does not allow boarders. I include the following "story" about him as follows:

In the 1970's, when streaking was almost commonplace at public events, Ernie was in the control room at TSV (Taos Ski Valley) when a call came in reporting that two people were streaking bare ass down Al's Run (Grand Central Station at TSV, note that Al's Run is considered as one of the MOST challenging runs in North America). Ernie got out his Steiner binoculars and stared out the window for a few seconds, then pressed the walkie-talkie and, in his Teutonic- accented English, said "There are a couple of people skiing naked down Al's Run. When they get to the bottom, throw the guy off the mountain. Give the woman a season pass.:" (copied, with minor additions by myself for clarification, from Unofficial Taos).


Think snow,

CP
post #40 of 56
This is a great thread. I had ignored it before thinking it was of little interest. I started skiing as a boy 40 yrs ago.
The account from getathlete1 is pretty amazing, to start that late and progress that far should stir any prospective late starters to action. I'm also very impressed by easyrider's post (#16). It reveals another thing about older skiers - they are smart and experienced. They follow advice. They know how to operate efficiently based on other transferable life experiences. This shrewdness saves time, effort, and money and minimizes headaches before they ever step into a pair of bindings.
About a year or two after my folks introduced me to skiing they got tired of watching me and my siblings have all the fun and began to hit the slopes themselves in their late forty's. They went on to build a vacation cabin at a ski area. For the next 15 years skiing became a primary focus of their leisure and recreation time. They got season passes and skied 25-40 days per season. They made some lasting, like-minded adult friends whom they skied with on weekends, went with on distant ski trips, and did and many off-season things (golf, dining, partying). They never progressed beyond upper intermediates, but that still unlocked a large and exceedingly rewarding world of recreational skiing. Part of the reason my folks introduced us to skiing was because it could be a unifying force that could draw older children and even adult children back for a shared family activity. It definitely worked. My dad skied solo and with his grandkids until arthritis got him at 75. With MSM and DMSO maybe he would be up for a comeback at age 88?
Maybe this is preaching to the choir, but some of the most enjoyable of their "golden" years were due to the fact that my parents got into skiing after age 50.
post #41 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Actually, my orthopedic surgeon told me that the latest studies don't show glucosamine doing a bit of good. I took it for at least 4 months and couldn't see a difference at all in the way my wrists were feeling. And it's so expensive I stopped using it.
Sorry to disagree with ya sibhusky....
Glucosamine has saved me from impending shoulder surgery with torn rotator cuff. I can understand a surgeon dismissing the use of glucosamine; it takes business away from them! As an older skier, 57, I do take supplements on a daily basis such as mkevenson suggests along with omega 3s, lipoic acid and Al's Formula (a multivitamin/mineral supplement designed for men over 45).
Maintaining a healthy physical state is of major importance in achieving optimum performance in the sport of skiing as we age. Being in the best physical shape gives us older skiers an equalizing benefit compared to some of the younger generations.
post #42 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
I speak from 65 yrs of experience, learned to ski at age 32. I am an advanced skier and have a great time. Remember, GET UP THE HILL, nothing replaces TIME ON THE SNOW.
You're 97. : I'm impressed.

Me? Started at age 54. After four seasons I am at the high end of intermediate and hope/plan to become an advanced level skier soon-January. IMO all that holds me back is my brain. Lessons will help also.
post #43 of 56
[quote=SNPete;771829]You're 97. : I'm impressed.

SNPete, not bad for 97 huh, lets ski Drop Out together next time I'm down at Mammoth.: Maybe it should have read 65yrs life experience and skiing since I was 32yr. Either way - still love Mammoth etc.
post #44 of 56
[quote=Pete No. Idaho;771902]
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post
You're 97. : I'm impressed.

SNPete, not bad for 97 huh, lets ski Drop Out together next time I'm down at Mammoth.: Maybe it should have read 65yrs life experience and skiing since I was 32yr. Either way - still love Mammoth etc.
In the summer Mammoth is a three hour drive for me. Ironically during ski season it is an eight to 12 hour drive depending on what passes are closed. However, the wife and I are planning to do a week at Mammoth this winter. it will be our first time there to ski. Maybe we can meet?
post #45 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragin' cajun' View Post
I can understand a surgeon dismissing the use of glucosamine; it takes business away from them!
Actually, any decent orthopeadic surgeon will devote considerable energy to avoiding performing surgery.

I'm 55; I've broken a clavicle (skiing); T4 (not skiing); and wrist (slipped on pickup tailgate while wearing ski boots after a wonderful out-of-bounds run). In each case, the ortho recommended waiting to see if surgery could be avoided. In each case, surgery was avoided.

I do not use glucosamine or any related products. I occasionally use a dose of a NSAID, but not often. I do not confine myself to groomers.

This is only one anecdotal data point. Your Mileage May Vary. Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate. All information should be independently verified by the final user. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. The Management is not responsible. Place the Disclaimer of Your Choice Here.

I know many skiers over 55. I know several who are well past 70. Some were even Ancient and Feeble (i.e., over 30) when they started. The rules are the same as for anyone else, of any age:
  • It helps to be in good physical condition (although "good" is a relative term).
  • You must actually want to do it, rather than just going along because someone else wants to do it.
If you are blessed with those two items, the rest will come. You will be motivated to take lessons and have fun. You will find instructors that you like. You will ski more often. You will make the time. You will seek out equipment that works well for you. You will learn what terrain you most enjoy. You will learn - because you want to.
post #46 of 56
I started skiing at age 53, 4 years ago, and increased my days-on-snow to 50 last season. (I ski Ice Coast.) For two years now I have been skiing in two race leagues to help me get better, and last year I pushed my Nastar rating up to Gold, and will be pushing Platinum hopefully this season. It's not pretty, but I can get down just about anything in New Hampshire short of hucking big boulders beneath the chairs. So it can be done.

On the negative side of this issue ..... one instructor last year told me that although late starters could learn to be pretty good skiers, no one who started skiing late in life could ever become a graceful expert on skis.

He was trying to be encouraging by saying maybe I could, (hesitate...) maybe..... But the effect was to let me know that he thought my goal was hopeless.

I continue to pursue "graceful expertise" anyway. In 30 years when I die with my skis on, we'll know how it went.
post #47 of 56
Thread Starter 

Graceful expertise

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
I started skiing at age 53, 4 years ago, and increased my days-on-snow to 50 last season. (I ski Ice Coast.) For two years now I have been skiing in two race leagues to help me get better, and last year I pushed my Nastar rating up to Gold, and will be pushing Platinum hopefully this season. It's not pretty, but I can get down just about anything in New Hampshire short of hucking big boulders beneath the chairs. So it can be done.

On the negative side of this issue ..... one instructor last year told me that although late starters could learn to be pretty good skiers, no one who started skiing late in life could ever become a graceful expert on skis.

He was trying to be encouraging by saying maybe I could, (hesitate...) maybe..... But the effect was to let me know that he thought my goal was hopeless.

I continue to pursue "graceful expertise" anyway. In 30 years when I die with my skis on, we'll know how it went.
Not sure what defines "graceful expert". It doesn't sound like a very helpful comment. Ultimately you define for yourself what you want (which it sounds like you're doing) and I'm sure pleasing other people isn't what you're trying to achieve. Congratulations on the tremendous progress that you've made Liquidfeet!:

mgmc (aka Ski Spirit)
post #48 of 56
All of you fine wine skiers are a true inspiration. I want to get my father to learn to ski but I am afraid he will hurt himself (as is he). He is a strong man, excellent health, but does not work out and has never skied a day in his life. He is 63, after reading some of your stories maybe there is a chance.
post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
All of you fine wine skiers are a true inspiration. I want to get my father to learn to ski but I am afraid he will hurt himself (as is he). He is a strong man, excellent health, but does not work out and has never skied a day in his life. He is 63, after reading some of your stories maybe there is a chance.
63 is not old, if I did the math right my father bought a motorcycle at about 58, retired at 63 and learned to ski right around that time, buying the first of a series of weekday season passes at Jiminy Peak.

Over a year after learning to ride, he got hung up in some gravel, crashing the bike, hurting a shoulder and riding about 30 miles home with severly bent handlebars. It took 6 months to get back on after that.

He took frequent ski lessons and enjoyed himself for years until he tweaked a knee at around age 71 or 72 when he decided to quit both activities while he was all in one piece.

There was then and still is a large group of older guys that ski Jiminy every day. They meet and start on one extreme side of the hill and follow the sun around until they reach the other side. Judging from the ones I still know in that group---63 would be one of the young'uns.
post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
...one instructor last year told me that although late starters could learn to be pretty good skiers, no one who started skiing late in life could ever become a graceful expert on skis...

The type of statement that makes all instructors cringe (with one notable exception above).

You can't be a graceful, but can get gold in Nastar.....please give me a break, I would say you're well on the way, if not there.
post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
On the negative side of this issue ..... one instructor last year told me that although late starters could learn to be pretty good skiers, no one who started skiing late in life could ever become a graceful expert on skis.
That instructor is a fool.

If older adults can be graceful on the ballroom dance floor, they can on the slopes too....it's as simple as that.
post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
If older adults can be graceful on the ballroom dance floor, they can on the slopes too....it's as simple as that.
I once had a discussion on a chairlift with a stranger about older people who ski. He described a day late in the season at Killington when he rode up the lift with a 70-something skier. It was wicked icy, and this older skier took off down a steep trail with head-high icy moguls. He told me this guy was pure "poetry in motion" as he slid around those moguls.

Now one day I'd like someone to say that about me. Not there yet, but one day ... maybe.
post #53 of 56

Old Fart Skiers

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
Actually, any decent orthopeadic surgeon will devote considerable energy to avoiding performing surgery.

I'm 55; I've broken a clavicle (skiing); T4 (not skiing); and wrist (slipped on pickup tailgate while wearing ski boots after a wonderful out-of-bounds run). In each case, the ortho recommended waiting to see if surgery could be avoided. In each case, surgery was avoided.

I do not use glucosamine or any related products. I occasionally use a dose of a NSAID, but not often. I do not confine myself to groomers.

This is only one anecdotal data point. Your Mileage May Vary. Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate. All information should be independently verified by the final user. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. The Management is not responsible. Place the Disclaimer of Your Choice Here.

I know many skiers over 55. I know several who are well past 70. Some were even Ancient and Feeble (i.e., over 30) when they started. The rules are the same as for anyone else, of any age:
  • It helps to be in good physical condition (although "good" is a relative term).
  • You must actually want to do it, rather than just going along because someone else wants to do it.
If you are blessed with those two items, the rest will come. You will be motivated to take lessons and have fun. You will find instructors that you like. You will ski more often. You will make the time. You will seek out equipment that works well for you. You will learn what terrain you most enjoy. You will learn - because you want to.

WELL SAID !!Attitude counts a lot. I rode up a chair one day with a guy who looked 80 and all he did was complain and moan. Said he was giving up the sport - damn boards, dam this dam that. Just before we got off the chair I ask him his age and he replied; "I'm 58". Wow I'm 65 and haven't given up on life yet. Good post Cooley.
post #54 of 56
I put kind of a long post on another thread so I won't repeat it all here. I had a few sporadic ski experiences at age 16, then again about 10 years later, but when I got semi-interested in really learning to ski about 3 years ago at age 55, I was barely beyond a strong snowplow and was very nervous and uncertain on skis. I fell off a lift and sprained my shoulder and broke a rib, and didn't consider doing this again until the 05-06 season. At that time I bought all the right equipment, including clothing to keep me warm enough in all weather conditions, and I skied a lot and improved a lot. Last year I cranked it up and took a bunch of lessons, and skied about 40 times. HUGE improvement by the end of the year. By the end of the season I had fallen in love with Squaw Valley and with skiing, and bought a season pass for this year. I'm stoked for this year, too....I already have in 5 long ski days at Boreal on their man-made snow, but I've been down the hill over 100 times and made enormous improvement even before the "real" season starts. My goal this year is a minimum of 50 ski days, hopefully much more. I've learned it's about MILEAGE!!! I'd call myself an advanced intermediate at this point, but I never would have believed I would ski this well at this point in my life....I'm now 58, and I absolutely LOVE skiing. I'd ski every single day if I could. Luckily I live only an hour from the nearest slope, so I can indulge more than a lot of people. All I can say is it's all about mileage.....you won't improve without it!
post #55 of 56
Oh yes....I ski with my husband, who is 61 and who is a much better skier than I am. I saw tons of skiers last year in their 60's and 70's, many of them on the older type skis. Poetry in motion, very impressive skiers. There are a lot of older skiers out there!
post #56 of 56
Thread Starter 
CMCM,
Welcome to Epic and thanks for posting. Great to hear your story, I started at 48 and am trying to gain mileage this year and start off w/much better equipment! It's great to hear how it's worked for you!!!
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