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The One Thing...

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'd like to see as many of our resident pros as possible chime in on this topic. We may have discussed it before, but what if you had to choose one technical feature of high level skiing that you would encourage any skier to strive for in their skiing - what would it be?

At the of of my list would be: Always be dynamic (flexion/extension), but I am curious what others (espcially the lurking pros) have to say.

Note - this is very generic and does not have to be student specific... and may get the "wheels turning" for some readers.

Later

GREG
post #2 of 21
Dynamic Balance.

Being in dynamic balance means balancing to where you are going, not being balanced statically where you are now (because in 1/10th of a second, you won't be there anymore, and you can't adjust your balance that fast to catch up).

Now... the actual task of gaining and maintaining that balance is the tricky part.
post #3 of 21
Look!
post #4 of 21
Recentering.
post #5 of 21
You have to explore the extreme boundaries of your balance/platform and be comfortable with a state of momentary imbalance (transitions) to make high level turns with early edge engagement. Want to arc 'em, get upside down
post #6 of 21
Release of the downhill ski to facilitate movement into or towards the next turn. Nolo touched on part of it with looking, JohnH with dynamic balance and Big E with recentering. What I like to play with is the commitment to move to the next turn, releasing what holds us on to the mountain for that split second while we go to the next turn. There is definately technical aspects to it but also a lot of fear and trust issues too.
I think one way to see a difference between higher levels of skiers is to see who fights the mountain and who plays with it. Each skier still has to respect the mountain but the higher level skier is not as afraid to let go.
post #7 of 21
Constant movement, to me one of the key hallmarks of high level sking is fluid seamless movement throughout your turns.
post #8 of 21
So important it needs to be stated more than once:

Stance Stance Stance

(really of major import at all levels.)
post #9 of 21
Rhythm and timing.
post #10 of 21
Try as I might, I can't pick just one thing. Everything listed so far is critical to the mix.

One word ... play. As in experiment and catalog feedback.

OK, so I re-read the instructions ... if it has to be a technical thing, then I also say dynamic balance skills (from play :-) )
post #11 of 21
Terry Barbour said it best: Harmony

When all the body parts work together, the skiing is smooth, powerful and elegant.
post #12 of 21
Go with the flow.
post #13 of 21
Use the force.
post #14 of 21
"Want to arc 'em, get upside down"...hey, i heard this from a PMTS guy I rode with at BC last season. He kept talking about the feeling of vertigo when you go into a turn where it should feel like you're about to tumble down the hill, as opposed to the "natural" tendency to fall back into the hill to "prevent yourself from getting upside down."

i need to work on this something fierce.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dooley View Post
"Want to arc 'em, get upside down"...hey, i heard this from a PM TS guy I rode with at BC last season. He kept talking about the feeling of vertigo when you go into a turn where it should feel like you're about to tumble down the hill, as opposed to the "natural" tendency to fall back into the hill to "prevent yourself from getting upside down."

i need to work on this something fierce.
I most definitely didn't get it from PM TS Its a universally understood key to high level skiing, no doubt. Thanks for the quote though

Heck, while I'm at it, and I'm sure this will drive folks nuts;

"Ski from the core first, everything else follows"
post #16 of 21

One more "the one thing"

Long leg, Short leg, parallel shins, put the hip on the snow


Ryan Leach, MSR Team

Nite all, off to Topeka to run slalom in cars! Be back in 10 days :
post #17 of 21
I'm with Weems on this one. Edge change. Do all the things that make a great edge change, and everything else is easy to accomplish by comparison.

Spag
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
Dynamic Balance.

Being in dynamic balance means balancing to where you are going, not being balanced statically where you are now (because in 1/10th of a second, you won't be there anymore, and you can't adjust your balance that fast to catch up).

Now... the actual task of gaining and maintaining that balance is the tricky part.

Yep. I was going to say the same thing . . .

Movement into the Future.
post #19 of 21
Dynamic motion in all planes.

One of the biggest stopping points for high level skiers always seems to be keeping their motion (be it leg extension, lateral movements, whatever) consistently dynamic.

Many very strong skiers will have good dynamic motion to a point, but in one form or another will get stuck somewhere and end up holding a position (even just for a minute amount of time), rather than being constantly fluid. Getting dynamic motion in all planes goes hand in hand with true balance, and is a fundamental step towards becoming a true "expert."
post #20 of 21
VERSATILITY.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notorious Spag View Post
I'm with Weems on this one. Edge change. Do all the things that make a great edge change, and everything else is easy to accomplish by comparison.

Spag
One of the main things i see with great skiers it that they are on thier new edges long before they reach the fall line...
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