New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Only one Book - Page 2

post #31 of 49
VSP, I'm sorry if I mis-understood. I have not read the Beattie book. I assumed you had mentioned a book on ski technique that was only interesting because it's suggestions were so antiquated that they were funny.

Agreed that there are many good books on skiing and many good books on ski technique. I will try to find the Beattie book if someone with your knowledge and experience recommends it in earnest as the one book on skiing that you value above all others. Thanks.
post #32 of 49
Telerod- no you did not mis-understand me... I meant it just as you took it. Especially since I have had the pleasure of meeting and even skiing with several of the contributors to that book, they and I found it quite funny by todays standards.

I only used it as an example of how any book may or may not provide anything of value.
post #33 of 49
Had the thread been about books that are hilariously wrong or if you wanted to make the point that all books about skiing were worthless, your post would have made more sense to me. I get that some books may not provide anything of value.

I'm sorry, the point about learning to ski vs. learning how to ski is a little too fine for me to discern.
post #34 of 49
VailSnoPro: "I stand by my comment about no one being able to learn from a book."

Vail SP,
I take your original comment, and the one quoted above, to mean that a person can never read a book carefully, follow its instructions ON THE SNOW, and learn to ski thusly. (I've never run into a book that implied that just sitting in a chair and reading the book would produce an immediate expert without any practice; have you? Have you ever read a how-to book on skiing? Is that really what you think learning from a book means?)

Every how-to book I've read, and I've read many, assumes that a reader will have to PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE what the books preaches. On the snow, thank you. Most offer drills that break down the target skill into manageable chunks. I moved to this method after taking, oh, six or seven lessons at different mountains (isn't that what the majority of lesson takers do?) and finding that instructors offered tidbits of information to me without any explanation of what overview these bits of advice contributed to (that would have taken too long while standing still on the side of the hill), and often one instructor would completely contradict the last one. I found it so relieving to read a how-to book by one person, who remained from the start to the finish consistent in terminology and in mission, and who explained that mission in detail and repeated it throughout the book.

I am a determined learner, and aim to become as good a skier as you and the other experts on Epic one day. This is NOT an easy task when one begins skiing past the ripe old age of 11. Books have helped me. I would never assert that books are the only way to go, however, nor that people can't learn by themselves, nor assert that instructors will never be able to teach a person to ski. Nor even that only one progression from novice to expert works. People learn differently.
post #35 of 49
Silly discussion... sure you can learn usefull things from books... offcourse its up to the reader.....
post #36 of 49
For learning how to ski: "The Essentials of skiing"

For learing about standard ski terms: "The skier's edge"
post #37 of 49
So VSP when is your book coming out?
post #38 of 49
Harb - Essentials of Skiing.


Runner ups: (or is it "runners up?")

Joubert... "Skiing, An Art A Technique" (I agree with whygimf)
Abraham... "Skiing Right"
DesLauriers... "Ski The Whole Mountain"







And among the best instructional books, we cannot forget that legendary skier, 50 Cent:









post #39 of 49
"Breakthrough on the New Skis" by Lito Tejada-Flores. Well written and easily understood. Useful for most skiers who would be reading a book about how to ski. "Ski the Whole Mountain" by Deslauriers. Also well written but not quite as good a read.
Both books make you want to go out and put into action the instructions in the books. That and readability are key. There is nothing more disappointing than a technically accurate but BORING "how to do it" book by someone who knows how to do it but not how to communcate it. (Personally I think HH's books suffer in the communication department.) If the writer can't make it fun it's hardly worth writing about.
post #40 of 49
surprised that no mentioned "Athletic Skier" by Warren Witherell.... the founder of Burke Mountain Academy (home and training grounds to 40 Olympians.)

anyhoo... it is one of the few ski books on my shelf.
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by chili View Post
surprised that no mentioned "Athletic Skier" by Warren Witherell.... the founder of Burke Mountain Academy (home and training grounds to 40 Olympians.)

anyhoo... it is one of the few ski books on my shelf.
Better known for "How the Racers Ski". I haven't read Witherell, but he is a highly regarded writer on ski technique.

I think Twardoken's name should be in this thread too.
post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post
"Breakthrough on the New Skis" by Lito Tejada-Flores. Well written and easily understood. Useful for most skiers who would be reading a book about how to ski. "
Since we were supposed to pick only one book, I hesitated between Lito's classic and HH's Essentials of Skiing. Lito has something that no one else I've ever read has -- compassion and empathy for the learner. So many experts are impatient with hesitant learners, but not Lito. He invests every description with an understanding of how odd, how counter-intuitive, and how frightening the new movement on skis may sound to the student. Along with this "I feel your pain" attitude is his never-ending positive attitude and continuous cheerleading. "You can do it!" pervades every paragraph.

So Lito's Breakthrough on the New Skis has been my gift book to many of my friends who go skiing for the first time, and who profess a willingness to read beforehand. I've also given it to those who are stuck indefinitely in intermediate skiing, and again who say they will read it.

Because of its deeply technical specificity, I would not recommend HH's Essentials of Skiing to most people. You gotta be really committed to read that baby front to back.

Most people I've come into contact with, no matter what they say, don't read carefully and don't make use of a book's instructions. They are not hungry enough to put forth the effort.
post #43 of 49
A single tip in Weems' book transformed my skiing.
post #44 of 49
World Cup Ski Technique by James Major and Olle Larsson.
post #45 of 49
I'm always surprised HH's 'Essentials' book gets the nod over his Any Can be an Expert Skier II' book-which I think is an easier read-appeals to a much broader group (I think essentials is good-but it's for the technical purist)-and the accompanying video with Expert II is excellent.

I also like Lito's last iteraton of Breakthrough on Skis. I recently downloaded John Clendinnens 'Aspen Method' Book-good read-haven't had the opportunity to take the concepts to the snow yet--anyone tried his stuff??

And finally-as per the video clip and disussion of the Sun Valley Mogul Method in that other thread I'm really interested in checking out their video/ literature as well.
post #46 of 49
I have read most of the books mentioned here, and own some of them. But if I could have only one book on skiing, it would be Bob Barnes' The Complete Encyclopedia of Skiing. It was my skiing bible when I was going for certification, but you don't need to be an instructor to find it a great resource that you'll refer to again and again. If I could have two books, the other would be Ron Lemaster's The Skiers Edge. If I could have 3, it would be Joubert.
post #47 of 49
Quote:
I recently downloaded John Clendinnens 'Aspen Method' Book-good read-haven't had the opportunity to take the concepts to the snow yet--anyone tried his stuff??
I've been to one of John's Camps and I thought his instruction was very good. Lots of attention to little toe edge turns and soft edges. John's approach seemed to be somewhat less precise than some of those discussed on Epic. He was more into teaching you how to "go anywhere" than teaching you how to "get there faster". Lots of emphasis on balance and feel. There's an interesting article about John's technique on Real Skiers.
post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimL View Post
I have read most of the books mentioned here, and own some of them. But if I could have only one book on skiing, it would be Bob Barnes' The Complete Encyclopedia of Skiing. It was my skiing bible when I was going for certification, but you don't need to be an instructor to find it a great resource that you'll refer to again and again. If I could have two books, the other would be Ron Lemaster's The Skiers Edge. If I could have 3, it would be Joubert.
It's a little pricey--there's a copy on Amazon for $144.94
post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by cometjo View Post
It's a little pricey--there's a copy on Amazon for $144.94
Or...you could just go to the PSIA-Rocky Mountain website and get it on cd for about $10.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching