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Want to buy New Skis

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I am in the market to buy some new skis. I am currently skiing on Rossi Bandit X's 177cm. I am 5'9 and I am a woman so I will not tell you my weight, but I am not a lightweight. Here is a picture of me skiing to give you a better idea of my body type. I like my Bandits, but I am having some trouble with them in the softer stuff and it was suggested to me that I probably should go to a shorter ski. Also, the last few times out last season I was beginning to have some difficulty with the back end of the ski(I have lost quite a bit of weight since I bought them and since teh picture). They are a man's ski and I was told that a woman's ski is designed to accomodate a woman's center of gravity and would be better for me.
I have been skiing since the mid 60's and can handle almost anything in New England (unfortunately the only place I have been). I tend to stay away from the bumps, however, because of a non-ski related knee injury. I rarely do glades, though I would like to try more. I ski fast usually and like to take short and medium radius turns. Can anyone suggest a good ski for someone like me?
Thanks
Note: Up until the Bandits I was on 195+ cm straight skis. My last pair of straight skis were Volants, the model they made for the NSP.

[ September 26, 2003, 05:06 PM: Message edited by: skierteach ]
post #2 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the great advice on skis. With all of the great information I got my job of deciding which ski to buy will be much easier.
post #3 of 25
Stockli SC, about a 168. Radius is 17 and has a great grip on the ice and the waist is narrow so it's quick edge to edge.

Lots of "meat" so the ski has a great top end as well as being a good turner.
post #4 of 25
Atomic R10 for women.

They look grey but shine purple in the sun.

My wife skis on the 160s and she is like 5'6" and not a feather weight.

The bindings are already mounted slightly forward but you can also move them to 4 positions.
post #5 of 25
Hi Skierteach,
IMHO, a "female specific ski" is often just a ski designed for very lightweight or non-agressive skiers. I know that's not always the case, but I'd be wary of going for a ski just because it has the female designation. If you ski fast on NE hardpack, I wouldn't rule anything out except "real" race skis.

My wife has skied on "female skis" and generally not been too impressed. She's ~125 lbs. and is loving the 160 cm. Salomon Crossmax 9 Pilots that I got her last year. It would have been a mistake to have gotten the Crossmax 8W version. I think making female skis is just a marketing ploy for some manufacturers.

If I were you, for groomed NE skiing, I'd try to demo the Volkl 5 Star in a 168, or something with a similar slalom profile. There are a lot of good mid-fat skis out there too, but they will probably be geared more toward a larger turn radius than you'd prefer.

If you get a ski with a binding that can be moved fore and aft, as with the Atomic bindings, you can also have some ability to move your mounting position forward if you like.

[ September 30, 2003, 06:42 AM: Message edited by: Carvemeister ]
post #6 of 25
I agree that most women skis are flimsy for a normal sized woman but the Atomic R11 are enough ski for most men.

My wife tried the Volkl Carver Motion 20/20 and she bent two pairs in 2 months.

Atomic isn't even releasing their unisex R10 in most places because the skis are the same with a different graphic.

Just demo as much as possible.

I am not sure where in Mass you are but there are a few places that have high end demos such as Ski Shop North in Peabody/Danvers and also the original Ski Shop in Framingham. Ask for John in the North store or Teddy in the Framingham store.

I am not sure if Ski Market has demos but you may want to check.
post #7 of 25
Do you carve or skid the ski?
post #8 of 25
I was going to ask the same thing because in that picture the skis are not even remotely carving.

But I assumed she was just slowing down for the picture.
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by DangerousBrian:
Do you carve or skid the ski?
Quote:
I was going to ask the same thing because in that picture the skis are not even remotely carving.

But I assumed she was just slowing down for the picture.
I was slowing down for an eleven year old to take the picture, that is true. I learned (basically) with the GLM method, however, and so I do still skid sometimes coming out of my turns. I have gotten better since moving to the shaped ski 2 years ago but want a ski that will help me continue to improve this. I don't, however, want a ski that can not handle more advanced runs.

The other day a sales person tried to put me on a ski that has been rated for beginner to mid-intermediate because I mentioned that I sometimes skid the end of my turns. That is not enough ski for me. My first pair of "shaped" skis were Elan Integra 5.0, they had a mid intermediate rating...they were not enough ski, they did not have the zip I need.
post #10 of 25
The SX11 is a beast.

The SX9 would be more than enough ski for most.

I have heard that Atomic will be making an SX10 soon as well.
post #11 of 25
A great ski for you would be a softer less demanding ski than the bandit. I find that rossi's are typically more on the unforgiving side of skis. I would recommend a K2 Axis XP or a salomon xscream series. Both of the skis should be skied at a 175. They are both forgiving, go anywhere skis that would allow you to ski at ease and not force you to be on your toes all the time.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by skierteach:
I like my Bandits, but I am having some trouble with them in the softer stuff and it was suggested to me that I probably should go to a shorter ski.
Don't really understand this advice as generally the greater the surface area the better the float in the soft stuff.
The Bandit X is a ski for the groomed, the Bandit XX is more 50/50 on piste off piste. Bandit XX has been replaced with the B2. I hear the B2 is softer than the old Bandit XX so the XX might suit you better (and should be cheaper). How soft do you mean? 2", 3", 6" 12", bottomless powder? chopped up crud? soft on or offpiste?

Quote:
Originally posted by skierteach:
Also, the last few times out last season I was beginning to have some difficulty with the back end of the ski(I have lost quite a bit of weight since I bought them and since teh picture). They are a man's ski and I was told that a woman's ski is designed to accomodate a woman's center of gravity and would be better for me. I have been skiing since the mid 60's and can handle almost anything in New England (unfortunately the only place I have been).
Old habits die hard - most of my Austrian friends learnt years ago with older techniques and scoff at the suggestion of taking lessons. Many of them wash their tails out, but they have fun so where's the problem? Learning new techniques will however help you to get the most out of your equipment. I suspect the problem with the tails is not the ski but the rider, have you ever taken a ski lesson specifically to learn how to use carving skis? Have you ever tried a really short ski that is designed to carve - it probably won't feel good to begin with but should improve your carving skills if they are at fault.

Other skis to consider that are similar to the Bandit XX / B2 ....
Volkl 724 AX3
Monster IM75
Fischer FX 7.6 FTi
Atomic R10 PULS TI / R11 PULS TI / R10 PULS TI - women specific model

maybe try something different like a super-cross ski
Atomic SX11

My advice would be to make up a list, go to a ski rental shop that has a wide selection and try a different ski each day (and the same ski in different lengths) until you find the right one for you.
post #13 of 25
Don't upgrade your gear. The money is way better spent on your technique on your current gear. Get a base regrind, wax and edge sharpen and get some good lessons.

IMO only.
post #14 of 25
Just a couple of pointers that might be helpful for you:

1. Widen your stance! You are much too narrow.

2. You are leaning in.
Get more of your upper body over your downhill ski, moving down the hill. This takes a little guts and commitment to let your body lead down the hill but you want your skis trying to catch up to your body not your body trying to catch up to your skis! Try planting your pole directly downhill from your boots especially on steeper terrain!

3. Also try more "ankle flexion". Bend at your ankles to help get your weight forward.

4. Be very patient at the start of your turn. In other words no twisting motion with your knees or feet. Just roll your ski on edge and do nothing other than stand on the edges. Let the natural shape of the ski make your turn. Any twisting at the beginning of your turn assures skidding at the end. You must start your turn with the tip portion of your ski. A good drill to practice to learn to carve is Warren Witherall's "Railroad Tracks". Check it out in his book, "The Athletic Skier". I swear it works, if you can master this very simple drill!

5. You must exaggerate everything i have suggested here. Do it twice as much or as far as what you think you should and you will still only be 1/2 way to where you need to be!

Good Luck & let us know how you are doing!

[ October 01, 2003, 08:53 PM: Message edited by: Atomicman ]
post #15 of 25
Although you did not note or ask....I woud recommend you think about boots before skis. The boot is where the skiing comfort, control and performance come together for the skier.

Without the right boot to match your ability, foot shape.... without the correct fitting with a footbed even your perfect ski may seem like a loser for you.

Skis are easy. The boot is the critical connection.

David
post #16 of 25
Hi Laurie,

I think it's funny that you don't include Epic on your list of favorite ski websites! [img]redface.gif[/img]

I think your skis are fine, but if you want new ones (everyone does!) why not a B1 or B2?
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by lurking bear:
Hi Laurie,

I think it's funny that you don't include Epic on your list of favorite ski websites! [img]redface.gif[/img]

I think your skis are fine, but if you want new ones (everyone does!) why not a B1 or B2?
I sent a message last year when I made the site asking to put a link for EPIC on my site, but did not get a response. I will not post a link w/o permission from the people who run a site, I think it is impolite.(my personal opinion)

Thanks Atomicman and everyone else for the tips and suggestions.

I have been skiing for a great many years and when you have developed habits, as you know, they are hard to break. When I learned the feet had to be tight together. I'm working on it though. As I did say however, that was a quick slow down so a kid could snap off a picture, she has missed me several other times that day and was getting frustrated. Many of the pictures she took caught just a part of me as I zoomed past her.
post #18 of 25
I would say Rossi's B2. Really forgiving and a lot of fun. But, must of all, demo before buying!
post #19 of 25
Those are fine skis.. Conditioning, practice and training is the answer. Gear is overrated. :
post #20 of 25
Atomic R10 170cm definitely worth a look. Try a 160 too.

Great carve, but happy to skid.
Moveable binding - and you'll want to move it forward.
Similar shape to BanditX, but a better ski IMHO. Yes I've used both. I own R10 and BanditXX.
A female friend bought some R10 after trying mine and is in love (with the skis).

A 170 R10 will be more like a 175 BanditX - the running surface is much longer in the Atomic for the same published length.

And I think gear makes a BIG difference. If your Bandits are a few years old there are now MUCH better skis out there.

grum
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by grum:

And I think gear makes a BIG difference.
The industry loves gearheads like you. A good skier can adapt to the skis. I agree, conditioning and training comes before new skis every year. As long as your boots are decent and fit well. I say hit the gym. Do you work out, Skierteach?

[ October 02, 2003, 05:56 PM: Message edited by: Nightingale ]
post #22 of 25
Who else works out regularly besides me? I say there is no "magic bullet", you get better by conditioning and training. I would say going from the old BanditX to the new one wouldn't make that big a difference.
post #23 of 25
skierteach,

I'm moved to first compliment you on the guts it took to post a picture. You have gotten a great deal of advice and some of it is questionable in my estimation.

First of all, if you WANT new skis TREAT yourself to new skis. I am lucky to pro rep for a company and skis have changed a great deal in the past few years.

Without an opus about ski design, woman specific skis are designed primarily to support a slightly lighter skier and to have a mounting point "slightly forward" to accomodate a womwns slightly lower center of gravity. One of the things that may mitigate the need to move you slightly forward id the size of your foot. In addition a talented boot fitter can do things to change ramp angles and delta angles in the boot to also preclude the need to mount you forward on a ski.

The most common difference cited for women is a different "Q-angle". The primary symptom is being knock kneed or what we term "underedged" (I know this may seem a counter-intuitive term) and you look as though your tib/fibs are very well aligned.

I do think your skis are too long. I'm a level III cert in the Rocky Mountain Division of PSIA, am 5'10, 180 lbs, and ski a 160 cm ski and a 170 cm ski.

I was moved to write because of the advice you received concerning technique. Be careful about whom you listen to. I do not agree at all with the advice you were given.

Seek the advice of a qualified professional. The first thing that struck me when I saw your picture is how relaxed you look on skis, how well aligned you are, and how well centered. Angles of single stii photographs are often tough to consider. In short I think you look great on your skis and it klooks like you were having a pretty good time!

Try different skis, however, go a little shorter! Find an instructor that you relate well to and allow he or she to guide you in your selection.

Good luck and your skiing looks great!
post #24 of 25
Good thread - Q to the masses: Which body stat is more important to the relation to length selection , hieght or weight? I run over 200 lbs and would consider that more of a factor than my height 5'10"(Before you diss me for being overweight, muscle weighs more than fat and I have been in the gym 5 days a week for the last year) I am considering a Bandit XX, what would be a good all-round length?
post #25 of 25
hey skierteach,
i'd simply echo what's been mentioned....
Demo the 170s(B1s/BanditXs) using AtomicMan's info....
There could also be an alignment/boot_thing (as dsgould mentioned) needing work.
Get those extra eyes watching you (lessons...once in a while)...

[ October 07, 2003, 07:06 PM: Message edited by: HaveSkisWillClimb ]
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