or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › The tabulated results of the best skiers of all time are in !
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The tabulated results of the best skiers of all time are in !

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
These results are not ranked, these are simply the best of their time and place. Some, even today, are timeless.

Stein Erickson
Jean Claude Killy
Ingemar Stenmark
Marc Girardelli
Alberto Tomba
The Mahres'
Scott Schmidt
Tamara McKenny
Whoever did the stunt work for Bob Redford in " Downhill Racer."
The Hermanator even though he wasn't able to compete last
season,and may never be as good as he was in 2001.

Two Americans that could be added to the list in the future: Bode Miller, and Kristen Koznick.

Of course there are others, but limiting lists to only three i find to be..... too.....limiting !
post #2 of 27
Damn, I didn't make the cut again.
post #3 of 27
Where are the following?

Franz Klammer
Toni Sailer
Gustavo Thoeni
Hans Enn
Pirmin Zurbriggen
Annamarie Moser
Rosi Mittermayer
Jim McConkey
Vreni Schneider

and of course many many more skiers who changed the way we ski.
post #4 of 27
What about Toni Matt? Surely a man capable of running the inferno in 6 and a half minutes, on 15 foot long wooden skis with no edges, and lace up boots, is deserving of being on that list. That course is 4,268 vertical feet. That's so much more than most, if not all, F.I.S. downhill courses today. Not to mention that the John Sherburne Trail (2nd half of the course) used to be much narrower than it is now. They removed the evil pine tree on "dead man's curve" several years ago. The trail is fairly narrow still. I can only imagine what it must have been like in 1937. Seriously, if you think about what Matt did, it boggles the mind. I can't even comprehend what it must have been like to see him straight run the headwall. I would give anything to be there and watch that, wouldn't you?
post #5 of 27
Please add Michael Milton unless you know many others who have won ALL FOUR disciplines in 1 Olympics/Paralympics. (let alone the rest of the guys results!)
post #6 of 27
Speaking of paralympics, don't forget about Diana Golden....
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by MittersillManiac:
What about Toni Matt? Surely a man capable of running the inferno in 6 and a half minutes, on 15 foot long wooden skis with no edges, and lace up boots, is deserving of being on that list. That course is 4,268 vertical feet. That's so much more than most, if not all, F.I.S. downhill courses today. Not to mention that the John Sherburne Trail (2nd half of the course) used to be much narrower than it is now. They removed the evil pine tree on "dead man's curve" several years ago. The trail is fairly narrow still. I can only imagine what it must have been like in 1937. Seriously, if you think about what Matt did, it boggles the mind. I can't even comprehend what it must have been like to see him straight run the headwall. I would give anything to be there and watch that, wouldn't you?
Matt’s accomplishment is indeed impressive . . . and so impressive that the details are worth getting right:

- Skis of that era were not 15 feet - his are reported to be exactly half that length (or about 229cm, only around 17cm or so longer than modern dh racing skis).

- His gear was indeed primitive by today’s standards, but his skis did at least have metal edges.

- The vertical relief from the summit to Pinkham Notch is not 4,268 but rather 4,260 (4,288 minus 2,028) and since the race didn’t start quite at the very summit, the course is reported to be a bit less than that.

- Either way, the FIS dh max is 1,100m/3,609 feet, so regardless of which figure you use, the course had more vertical than any FIS course.

- The year was not 1937 but 1939. (This is actually quite important, since with the outbreak of WW II, the full race was never held again, and therefore Matt’s record was never challenged.)

But yes, it still boggles the mind, and here’s a good account for more reading:
http://www.concordmonitor.com/storie...matt1121.shtml
post #8 of 27
What ever happen to Wayne Wong?
post #9 of 27
Why hasn't anyone mentioned Mike Hattrup? - possibly one of the most underrated ever!!
post #10 of 27
Are racers automatically the best skiers? There is only name on that list that is not reckonized as a top racer, and Schmidt started as a racer. Who would even consider trying to rank the greatest skiers of all time? What about some of the younger generation who are doing things that people didn't even imagine 20 years ago?
post #11 of 27
This topic has got to be up there with which "bindings are best" in terms of controversy. This list was tabulatd from where? And it definitely seems to be a list of successful racers of yesteryear. There is definitely no-one on that list whose skiing I want to emulate.

[ December 23, 2002, 11:33 AM: Message edited by: kiwiski ]
post #12 of 27
"There's no one on that list whose skiing I want to emulate"???

Really? So you're a boarder?
post #13 of 27
Too many racers... where are those that brought innovation to the sport in other areas??? Obviously the topic is subjective, but I hardly think the best skiers of all time are all racers.
post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 
I AGREE ! All the above mentioned skiers in the previous posts to this thread, seem to be worthy of being added, so lets do so without delay ! Yes there are far to many lists of whose best etc.

Kiwiski, you're right ! It was an unscientific study, because the results.... were in fact.... my own results. Congratulations on questioning the authenticity of my original post.

Some may argue that this has been a bit of a "sham," a cloud if you will.... but the "silver lining" in all this are all the greats that I had not mentioned, but others that made the effort to recognize.

So to one and all...if someone else has been left off the list..state who they are, why they should be added to the list, and consider it done...provided it is not successfully challenged by someone else.

...and finally, a safe a happy holiday season to one and all.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Shefftz View Post

Quote:
Originally posted by MittersillManiac:
What about Toni Matt? Surely a man capable of running the inferno in 6 and a half minutes, on 15 foot long wooden skis with no edges, and lace up boots, is deserving of being on that list. That course is 4,268 vertical feet. That's so much more than most, if not all, F.I.S. downhill courses today. Not to mention that the John Sherburne Trail (2nd half of the course) used to be much narrower than it is now. They removed the evil pine tree on "dead man's curve" several years ago. The trail is fairly narrow still. I can only imagine what it must have been like in 1937. Seriously, if you think about what Matt did, it boggles the mind. I can't even comprehend what it must have been like to see him straight run the headwall. I would give anything to be there and watch that, wouldn't you?
Matt’s accomplishment is indeed impressive . . . and so impressive that the details are worth getting right:

- Skis of that era were not 15 feet - his are reported to be exactly half that length (or about 229cm, only around 17cm or so longer than modern dh racing skis).

- His gear was indeed primitive by today’s standards, but his skis did at least have metal edges.

- The vertical relief from the summit to Pinkham Notch is not 4,268 but rather 4,260 (4,288 minus 2,028) and since the race didn’t start quite at the very summit, the course is reported to be a bit less than that.

- Either way, the FIS dh max is 1,100m/3,609 feet, so regardless of which figure you use, the course had more vertical than any FIS course.

- The year was not 1937 but 1939. (This is actually quite important, since with the outbreak of WW II, the full race was never held again, and therefore Matt’s record was never challenged.)

But yes, it still boggles the mind, and here’s a good account for more reading:
http://www.concordmonitor.com/storie...matt1121.shtml

Jan 13, 2009

Hi Racing Bears:

One of the more amazing but less publicized tidbits of this race was the differences in finishing times between Toni Matt (6m 29s) and runner up Dick Durrance (7m 28s), for almost a minute difference.  When the differences in times for a modern downhill is measured in several 10th of seconds, it is clear that on that day in 1939, Toni Matt was racing at a level so much above the other 41 competitors. (ref:  I Dared the Headwall by Toni Matt, Skiing Magazine April 1964 Vol16 #6)

Think snow,

CP

ps: made a few turns and chatted with Glen and  Kimberly Plake at Ski Liberty yesterday.  Besides being outstanding mountaineer and skiers, they are just an amazing stand-up all-right couple.

post #16 of 27
I don't know where they stand on the list, but there are J6s racing this weekend who weren't born when the last post was made in this thread.
post #17 of 27
 Holy Thread Resurrection Batman! From 2002! Wink is the person who turned me on to Epic almost 10 years ago. I don't know what happened to him, he seamed to fall off the face of the earth.
post #18 of 27
I bet Scott Schmidt would put Patrick Vallencant at the top of his list!
post #19 of 27

Those French guys!   
A culture, Chamonix extreme skiing, where these French guys decided not to race, but to ski   THAT!  .   So some major talent went another route and changed skiing dramatically.

In America at that time, racing was still the apex of the sport and if you thought you were good, you raced.

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 Holy Thread Resurrection Batman! From 2002! Wink is the person who turned me on to Epic almost 10 years ago. I don't know what happened to him, he seamed to fall off the face of the earth.


gee, I hope nnnnnot. (early astronaut joke about the crash pad or something:  my name Jose Jimenez. )

but, really, we don't use that expression when referring to skiers do we? I mean the way the literal definition fits a little too well an all, just seems harsh.
post #21 of 27
Wayne is still working to make skiing better for all of us, and I don't think anyone ever looked liked they were having more fun than Wayne. If only we could all smile as much doing something we love!
post #22 of 27
I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that Stein Erickson couldn't huck a switch rodeo 540.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post

I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that Stein Erickson couldn't huck a switch rodeo 540.
 

He could throw one heck of a back flip though.
post #24 of 27
Stein used to do a back flip over the lunch crowd on deck at the mountain restaurant at Aspen Highlands every day, and that was probably on 205 cm skis.  He was definitely pushing the envelope as it existed at the time, which makes him just as impressive as anybody doing a switch rodeo 540 today, not to mention 3 gold medals.
post #25 of 27
Stein and his fellow Norwegian buddies were throwing back flips in the early 40s during WWII.  They had to do something fun during the occupation.

How about Gretchen Frasier, first American gold medalist and won some major stuff by a huge margin.

Hans Schneider?  He was the Arlburg technique in his day.

Snowshoe Thompson, has anybody ever had more 1st descents?
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Betaracer View Post

Where are the following?

Franz Klammer
Toni Sailer
Gustavo Thoeni
Hans Enn
Pirmin Zurbriggen
Annamarie Moser
Rosi Mittermayer
Jim McConkey
Vreni Schneider

and of course many many more skiers who changed the way we ski.
Billy Kidd
Bode Miller
Glen Plake
Johnny Moseley
Wayne Wong
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post



He could throw one heck of a back flip though.
I only saw videos of hm doing fronts

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › The tabulated results of the best skiers of all time are in !