EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Anyone have experience with the Wintersteiger Discman?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Anyone have experience with the Wintersteiger Discman?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Starting on page 17 is the English instructions:

http://www.mbas.at/discmanGebrauchsanweisung.pdf

It seems more like a polish, rather than a true disc edge grinder since it's handheld. Has anyone here used it by chance? I'm actually really curious about it and perhaps getting my hands on one, but I think they're about $500 :/
post #2 of 16
Hey, saw that in the catalog. Sorry no experience with it, but I thought it was brilliant when I saw it. Only thing I'd wonder about is how much practice it would take to hold that eccentric adjuster firmly against the ski consistently what with the heft/shape of the thing.

With the lack of coolant and fairly small motor you'll be taking lighter passes than a trim machine turned up loud, but if you pull the sidewall back first I'll bet you get some great results. I think a lot of the spindle power in the big machines is to ensure they don't get bogged down chewing on sidewall.

Here's hoping someone responds with some experience.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
well, looks like it hits 16k rpm...heat from friction will probably evaporate it but maybe you can wet the edge down first for a better polish. I have a sidewall planer so it's not a problem knocking down the sidewall a little bit.

poor man's ceramic disc side-edger? i wonder what it would take to have the shop get a full blown ceramic disc edger :P
post #4 of 16
About twenty five grand, IIRC. (i wouldn't worry too much about the coolant. I've seen disc edgers run totally dry without disastrous or even totally bad results. these ceramic cups are used in industry to cut very hard tool steels with a ton more heat and a ton more feed...they work darned well over a wide variety of conditions in this application it seems. speaking of the disc speed, convert that 16k rpm at that diameter into surface feet per minute and I think you'll find it is very close to the figure for the six inch discs on the full size tools.)
post #5 of 16
Just did back of the envelope math and indeed if I recall the spindle speed for the trim correctly, both machines are grinding at ~5700SFM within ~1 percent of each other. That is a pretty typical speed for a grinding wheel.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
hm...
All things considered, maybe it's not that bad for $400~500. 25grand for just the ceramic cup grinder module? I don't know much about new machines, but I was offered a wintersteiger micro91 i think (the snowboard capable one with base grinder, edger, and stone) for $5000 used for 5 seasons...not sure what resale value is used on those things :P

The manual notes that it's designed to work with very little pressure so i'm guessing that the chances of one accidentally "tipping" the unit over while in use would be minimal if you're using it properly. If anything, apply some pressure outwards from you if the ski base is facing away from you and you can't really go out of whack since there's that guard plate looking thing that rests on the base

it seems like a really good tool for a shop that can't afford a ceramic cup grinder, to have for a relatively inexpensive price (compared to a full blown machine). For us, considering no shops around the area have a cup grinder (even though there are a LOT of skiers in the area) I think it might be a good way (since the results should be visible) to distinguish from other shops.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelloBoy View Post
I don't know much about new machines, but I was offered a wintersteiger micro91 i think (the snowboard capable one with base grinder, edger, and stone) for $5000 used for 5 seasons...not sure what resale value is used on those things :P
The micro 91 is a two sided machine with a belt edger right?
Quote:
I think it might be a good way (since the results should be visible) to distinguish from other shops.
Definitely...and its cheap enough.
post #8 of 16
Melloboy, I was asked to try a Discman last year by the publisher of a UK skiing magazine. Here's my comments:

- Tool has a quality feel to it. Case & charger also up to muster.
- I only used it on the side edge of a pair of Sweet Daddys (which were luckily pretty beaten up) & the tool was set to 3 degrees.
- the angle adjustment piece that rests on the side base is only about 5mm wide & I thought that the tool would therefore be unstable but it wasn't.
- the three contact points on the guide are all plastic. I know that there's some pretty tough plastic these days but you can't beat steel or at least anodised aluminium.
- tool not balanced due to the weight of the battery & wants to fall 'backwards' off the edge.
- tool is pretty heavy overall. I'd guess at about 2.5lbs.
- due to above I found the tool heavy as I was having to 'hold' it on the edge. Fatigue could be a factor when processing multiple skis.
- instructions say have the vertical ski base facing you but I found it hard to see properly & preferred to use the tool in a conventional base away position.
- stone cuts very cleanly & cutting speed is spot on. Finish is pretty good, surprisingly good, say between a 400-600grit equivalent.
- the cutting marks that are evident run across the edge rather along which makes them look rougher than they really are.
- no burr was raised on the base angle which surprised me.
- major problem was that the cutting stone appeared to wear quickly meaning that the cutting depth needed regularly adjusting for more engagement, however the adjustment was very smooth & precise.
- major problem was following the curve edges around the ends of the skis which caused the cutter to gouge the side angle which I then had to blend in with a conventional guide & file. The instructions say that the leading edge of the tool's guide/heel needs to be tilted in these areas but this then becomes a guesstimate & is way too imprecise for my liking making it very easy to gouge the base. Will need a very practiced operator to get this right
- no matter how practised one is the potential dissaster factor with this tool is too great for my liking
- I'm unsure of which market Wintersteiger are aiming for as it's too expensive (£300 retail in the UK) & way too 'hairy' for the a DIY tuner to risk using on their pride & joys, but too slow & again too hairy for stores to use on client's skis compared to conventional edging machines. IMO it's a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
- I'd like to see an experianced factory trained operator use to & see how they fair but for me it's a thumbs down.

Hope this helps.
post #9 of 16
post #10 of 16

I have one and have had it for a few years.  One of the best tools in my bench...  Unlike many other gimmicks out there, the discman does not heat the edge while polishing it.  You never end up work hardening the steel so if you want to go back to stones you can. 

post #11 of 16

Hi

I have the new discman 2 S  way better than the old one , faster, cheaper , no batteries .

 

 

http://www.myskiroom.com/shop/fr/machine/195-wintersteiger-discma-2-s-.html

 


 

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelloBoy View Post

 but I was offered a wintersteiger micro91 i think (the snowboard capable one with base grinder, edger, and stone) for $5000 used for 5 seasons...not sure what resale value is used on those things :P

 

^^Where abouts is this machine located?  Contact info?  Thats a reasonable price.

 

re:discman -

I've only used the first generation.  I think it's an excellent option for the DIY'er IF - you have money to burn, have kids in race programs, and tune regularly etc.  Comes in way cheaper than a snowglide or trione, and the new improvements on the 2nd gen model make it even more attractive.  Like any task that requires skill, you do have to put in your time to learn how to use it properly.

post #13 of 16

Have been using unit for 3 years.

Not for "amateur" tuners.

 

Must practice on old old skis some time before get "feel" of tune.

 

Use with "finesse" since it cuts deep and sharp.

 

As mentioned above some technical issues in the curved zones, You must learn to fade in and out with pressure flow.

 

In all cases you must do final tune with file.

 

I would recommend it to top level personal tuner. Too small for ski shops.

 

PS Must wear mask since very very fine particles from discs are a "breathing issue".

 

Converted mine to AC /  DC type currents.

post #14 of 16

http://www.verdonkracing.com/  Just for fun guysbiggrin.gif  If I could convince my wife I'd get the snowglide...so beautiful and sexyrolleyes.gif...I mean the tool, er my wife that is...

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icarus View Post

Have been using unit for 3 years.

Not for "amateur" tuners.

 

Must practice on old old skis some time before get "feel" of tune.

 

Use with "finesse" since it cuts deep and sharp.

 

As mentioned above some technical issues in the curved zones, You must learn to fade in and out with pressure flow.

 

In all cases you must do final tune with file.

 

I would recommend it to top level personal tuner. Too small for ski shops.

 

PS Must wear mask since very very fine particles from discs are a "breathing issue".

 

Converted mine to AC /  DC type currents.

as bolded, definitely a must.  a few of my team mates are using the wintersteiger and i have heard a few horror stories!

 

there is also a new one which should be on the market this month, the Protek, which price wise should lie midway between the wintersteiger and the Trione/Snowglide but with similar perfromance to the latter. Will be interesting to see how it performs

post #16 of 16
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Anyone have experience with the Wintersteiger Discman?