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What's a good medium level road pedal?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
I'm really starting to like this biking thing...

BUT it really bothers me when I shift or otherwise change my pedaling tempo and have my foot slip of the pedal. Time for some new gear...:

What do you guys recommend as a decent road pedal? I'd like to stay away from real low end, as I don't want the next best thing after the first week, but I also don't need a high end race setup, yet.
post #2 of 32
The new wide body Ultegra pedal would probably be my choice.
post #3 of 32
I have Look Keo Classics on my Trek and I really like them. I only have experience with lower end MTB pedals and Keo Sprints aside from these, so I can't comment on other brands, but the Classics seem to do everything I need them to at my level and they share the same design/functionality as the higher end Look pedals.
www.probikekit.com usually has good deals on them.
Later
GREG
post #4 of 32
Helluva, that outfit ships from the UK - so doesn't that add significantly to the net cost?
post #5 of 32
I'd vote for the Ultegra 6620 over the Keo. The main reason? Cleat durability. I've had many friends with Keos have their cleats break after very little use, and while Look has changed the design a bit, the flaw seems to still be there.

If you want something different, Speedplay pedals are also incredibly good and much better on the knees than most. They have a lot more float than the Shimano, Look and Time offerings.

As for me: I use the older Ultegra 6610 pedals now, and will have the 6620 on my new bike.

And if you want a really great bargain: the Shimano 5600 or 540 (same pedal) is a steal for what you get: a pedal that's almost identical to the 6610, perhaps a tiny bit heavier, but built to last. I put over 30,000 miles on a set w/o incident.
post #6 of 32
I would recommend mountain bike pedals. You can walk in the shoes, which is a nice feature in a shoe. My favorite are Time ATAC.
post #7 of 32
I also use MTB pedals. I have a set of K2 magnesium, Shimano clones on my road bike. They are very light and durable. I use Crank Bros. eggbeaters on my MTB's. I also have Time ATAC carbons. The eggbeaters are cheaper and lighter, get the stainless ones (SL).
post #8 of 32
Thread Starter 
I noticed a co-worker has MTB pedals. I kind of like the look of his shoes too, not super aggressive looking like some MTB shoes I've seen.
post #9 of 32

New to Clipless Pedals?

You may want to start using them in a grassy field. I am probably unusual
(or stupid) but when I started to use Clipless pedals (Time in my case) I had a terrible time remembering to step out at traffic lights, stop signs etc.

On glorious summer evening I was riding by the beach, came to a crosswalk occupied with two young gals in bikinis. Of course being the courteous cyclist I stopped to let them cross...a second later I remembered I had not stepped out and promptly fell on my side directly in front of them.:

The worst part was neither offered to help!
post #10 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
I also use MTB pedals. I have a set of K2 magnesium, Shimano clones on my road bike. They are very light and durable. I use Crank Bros. eggbeaters on my MTB's. I also have Time ATAC carbons. The eggbeaters are cheaper and lighter, get the stainless ones (SL).
Well I don't actually ride a road bike and I've only used the original Shimano MTB pedal and original Ritchey MTB pedal other than the ATACs. I might try the Eggbeaters SL when my second pair of Time pedals crap out. Thanks for the recommendation.

krp, as you've noticed, MTB shoes can be super aggressive or casual, even some sandals can hook up to MTB pedals. The reason I suggested MTB pedals is because mountainbike shoes can offer the performance of road shoes with perhaps a small weight difference due to the tread.
post #11 of 32
I swear by Time RXS Carbons. I was having BIG knee problems with my LOOK pedals (which I DID swear by...), but the Time pedals took care of all that.
post #12 of 32
I also vote for Ultegra - solid feel & well built.

I don't agree with MTB pedals and cleats. I used SPD cleats with Sidi Dominator or with Specialized Carbon mtb shoe for several years. Now I use Sidi Ergo 2 with Ultegra pedals/cleats. I didn't think that there would be a difference, between road vs. mtb cleats/shoes, but there is.

The road shoes are both lighter and stiffer, which translates into more comfort riding. On shorter rides (e.g. up to 90k) the differences are less apparent, but on longer rides (160k +) road shoes make a big difference. The energy transfer with road shoes is much better, especially when pedaling with effecient round strokes. There is a more positive connection of the feet to the pedals with road cleats.

The concern about walking, to me, is a non-issue. When I road ride, there is usually very little walking - why compromise riding comfort for walking (something that I'll do little of when my intent is to ride). Mountain biking can require long periods of walking (at lease here in the Canadian Rockies), and in this case, being able to walk well has some importance.
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianskier View Post
I also vote for Ultegra - solid feel & well built.

...The road shoes are both lighter and stiffer, which translates into more comfort riding.
OK, I strand corrected. I guess road pedals are the way to go if you don't use your bike for transportation.
post #14 of 32
Well, maybe. MTB pedals are lighter, generally cheaper. As for MTB shoes, some are pretty darn light and stiff. I guess it just depends on what you want to do with your bike and how much you want to spend.
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by oboe View Post
Helluva, that outfit ships from the UK - so doesn't that add significantly to the net cost?
Actually quite often US shipping is free. When it isn't free, they use flat rate shipping to the US. It is also very rare (almost unheard of) that items are stopped at customs and duty is charged, although I have heard that shipments going to Canada are often stopped by Canadian authorities, and duty is then applied.

I have placed orders from there up to $150 without any trouble... I do not know what would happen if the order was extremely high priced (say $600+)...

Later

GREG
post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
Well, maybe. MTB pedals are lighter, generally cheaper. As for MTB shoes, some are pretty darn light and stiff. I guess it just depends on what you want to do with your bike and how much you want to spend.
But if you're serious about getting into road cycling, it's best to go with a wider-platform, road-specific pedal system.

When I first started riding my road bike, I used SPD pedals and shoes because it's what I had on my mountain bike. And yes, the SPD road pedals were light, and my mountain bike shoes stiff and walkable. But I found two major limitations to the MTB pedal setup:

1. It was tough to get a good pull-stroke with the SPDs: even at the highest release setting, I'd pull out; and

2. I'd get wicked hot spots on the soles of my feet due to the tiny contact patch between shoe and pedal.

Granted, I moved up the latter of road cycling intensity rather quickly, so I soon learned the limitations of my equipment. And my feet have always been problematic due, in large part, to my ski racing days and the re-shaping effects of race-fit boots during my teenage years.

So after I tried other SPD-compatible shoes, I eventually switched to SPD-SL - and the change was all positive. The pull-stroke in my pedaling was perfect without having to crank down the release on the pedals, and the hot spots went away. Furthermore, the SPD-SL cleats are perfectly walkable (and frankly, any skier should be able to walk in bike cleats - after all, y'all can walk around fine in ski boots, right?), and they are cheap to replace.

(That said, my SPD cleats on my MTB shoes have lasted me 10 years of hard use - steel is real, in that case.)

As far as being lighter, that's not usually the case. Speedplay and the carbon-body Look pedals are often lighter than almost any MTB pedal, save for the Eggbeaters.

Just my $0.02 - YMMV.
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
I have placed orders from there up to $150 without any trouble... I do not know what would happen if the order was extremely high priced (say $600+)...
Reading some of the threads over at BikeForums, it seems that the higher-ticket items (over $500) are sometimes being charged an import duty. This came to a head recently with their amazing prices on full Ultegra and Dura Ace groups (which also were exempt from the free shipping to the USA policy, though still amazingly cheap).

But the free shipping applies to most smaller items, and delivery times tend to be fast - usually within a week. I've ordered a bunch of parts from them, and have had nothing but positive experiences.
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post
I've ordered a bunch of parts from them, and have had nothing but positive experiences.
Now if they would just carry Fulcrum wheels at similar prices to their Mavic wheels I'd be all set (really want the new Racing Zero instead of the Kysrium ES that I am planning on putting on my new ride).
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Now if they would just carry Fulcrum wheels at similar prices to their Mavic wheels I'd be all set (really want the new Racing Zero instead of the Kysrium ES that I am planning on putting on my new ride).
Wheels are one part that I would steer away from ordering from PBK, because the shipping isn't free and you'll more-than-likely pay a duty on them - making the deal less of a bargain. I've found good deals on Fulcrums and Mavics by looking around the web at domestic suppliers, and have found prices that beat PBK in many cases (e.g. WheelWorld and GVHBikes).
post #20 of 32

Time RXS

Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
I swear by Time RXS Carbons. I was having BIG knee problems with my LOOK pedals (which I DID swear by...), but the Time pedals took care of all that.
I have the Time RXS pedals, and like the float (I also have Time ATAC mtb pedals). Nothing like road pedals on your roadie; maybe it's placebo effect, but it feels faster.

Caveat: Initially, RXS pedals were recalled due to a loose nut. The ones out now have/should have a retrofit that corrects the issue entirely. Just make sure you either have new ones or ones that got the fix. In part, the RXS pedals are usually a little less expensive, relative to other makers' pedals at the same level, due to this issue.

BTW: The Time RXE pedals are the same as the RXS, except for the lack of adjustable elasticity. IMO, they're a great value and can be found for ~$80.
post #21 of 32
I run Look Keo's on all of my bikes. I have the Sprint on my Fixie, and both my TT bike and road bike have the Keo Carbons. They are an improvement over the Speedplay's that they replaced, with a larger surface area, and a cleat that doesn't re-adjust itself over time. I had a crash with the speedplay when my cleat broke, and therefore wouldn't release from the pedal. With the Look, when a cleat breaks, it just dis-engages from the pedal and won't stay put. Plus, Look cleats are pretty cheap to replace. I like them.
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
(my new ride).
Did you say new ride? Do tell...

btw - Colorado Cyclist has the 7801 DA wheels on sale for like $400. I have the 7801 SLs which are really nice.
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Did you say new ride? Do tell...

btw - Colorado Cyclist has the 7801 DA wheels on sale for like $400. I have the 7801 SLs which are really nice.
It is not a domestic brand bike (actually Austrian, so it must be fast right?), but was actually made by the same company that builds frames for specialized, giant, and a few other big names... It is a carbon tubular frame... probably the closest frame in performance would be the Look 585.

Frame: KTM Strada LC
Fork: KTM (full carbon)

Hoping to set it up with full SRAM Force compact (12-27), Ksyrium ES, and Deda Bars and Stem (Newton), and some other random carbon parts to keep the weight down. This will be my climber. Right now it is built up with some lesser grade stuff that came attached to the frame, but i intent to work on it this winter and have it ready with all the new stuff next spring. Should be somewhere around 6900g to 7000g built (with pedals and computer).

Later

GREG
post #24 of 32
I use MTB shoes and pedals on my roadie (as well as my MTB - duh). I can't say enough good stuff about the Crank Bros Candy pedals. Not very heavy, incredibly easy in and out, no adjustments to deal with, and you can pull up on them as hard as you want and not pull out. And they're inexpensive too. You can get candy Cs (they use chrome instead of stainless or Ti) for about $50. You can get the Stainless (Candy S) for about $75. The ONLY issue with using them with MTB shoes, is that you may have to cut out a bit of your shoe ligs (tread) around the cleat to get it to engage fully into the pedal, dur to the treads hitting the platform of the pedal before it locks in. I have a dremmel tool, so it was a 2 minute operation.

They make a Crank Bros pedal specifically for road bikes now (forgot the name off the top of my head), but it's actually heavier than the Candy and slightly more expensive (about $80-$90). They look purtier, but that's about it.
post #25 of 32
You need to trim the shoe ligs if you choose the Speedplay Frogs also. Depending on the shoe perhaps. Frogs are very good though, worth considering.
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
I have the Time RXS pedals, and like the float (I also have Time ATAC mtb pedals). Nothing like road pedals on your roadie; maybe it's placebo effect, but it feels faster.

Caveat: Initially, RXS pedals were recalled due to a loose nut. The ones out now have/should have a retrofit that corrects the issue entirely. Just make sure you either have new ones or ones that got the fix. In part, the RXS pedals are usually a little less expensive, relative to other makers' pedals at the same level, due to this issue.

BTW: The Time RXE pedals are the same as the RXS, except for the lack of adjustable elasticity. IMO, they're a great value and can be found for ~$80.
I had mine fixed - the service center was local, and it took a day. I don't think they were cheaper due to this issue though - I had mine 2 years before the recall. They're as good as anything out there closed to their price.

The RXE's however, are prone to breakage.
post #27 of 32
Interesting. I've consistently seen RXS pedals relatively cheaper in the last two years and attributed the lower demand/prices to the recall. About the RXEs being subject to breakage; hadn't heard that before. Did you read that on rbr.com or somewhere, or talk to someone at the service center?
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
Interesting. I've consistently seen RXS pedals relatively cheaper in the last two years and attributed the lower demand/prices to the recall. About the RXEs being subject to breakage; hadn't heard that before. Did you read that on rbr.com or somewhere, or talk to someone at the service center?
Again, the recall didn't occur until this past year, so I don't know how you have lower prices due to a recall that hadn't happened yet. : I can't comment on demeand. I don't sell them - I use them.

No, I didn't read about on RBR - I wouldn't be looking for road bike info there anyway. : Personal experience - two people I ride with had them. They got them because they were CHEAP. They don't have the carbon reinforcement, and the tips of the pedals have snapped off - once for one guy and twice for the other. One stayed with Time and got the RXS Carbon and has since had no problems (that's what I use on two bikes - never had a problem - 3 years now), and one went back to Shimano. Now that I think about it - I'm not sure if they were RXS or RXE - I think they may have just been the non-carbon RXS - I may need to retract my RXE comment... But anyway, sufice to say that the two people I rode with with non-carbon Time pedals had breakage. Not good.

I do have the ATAC pedals (forget which model, but they were about $100 - the XS I think??) on my MTB - SOOOOOOOOooooo much nicer than the Shimanos I had been using because of the float in the pedal - the Shimano seemed a much more rigid, "grabby" pedal. The "feel" of this pedal is much nicer to me. I also like the size of the Time platform. I have yet to get the SPD "hot spot" that I did with my SPD's - even though the cleat is about the same size.
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
Again, the recall didn't occur until this past year, so I don't know how you have lower prices due to a recall that hadn't happened yet. : I can't comment on demeand. I don't sell them - I use them.
whatev. I got my pedals fixed immediately after the recall in 2006 & have seen them on sale frequently since the time the recall was announced. (For instance, it seems they're pretty much on sale whenever I get my Colorado Cyclist catalogue). I inferred lower demand because they're always on sale. wouldn't be the first to do so...

I found out about the recall on roadbikereview.com. Good source for info. (sorry, I guess I should've spelled it out in crayon to insure you knew I was talking about roadbikereview.com, instead of a radio broadcasting site. figured most people here knew about mtbr.com and roadbikereview.com)

I've had the regular RXS pedals since 2005, and had no breakage. That said, there are numerous reports of breakage. (see roadbikereview.com; reviews on rxs pedals).

conclusion (pretty much same as before): nice pedals for a decent price, some issues, but performed well for me personally over the course of several years.

Have a good ride all.
post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
I use MTB shoes and pedals on my roadie (as well as my MTB - duh). I can't say enough good stuff about the Crank Bros Candy pedals. Not very heavy, incredibly easy in and out, no adjustments to deal with, and you can pull up on them as hard as you want and not pull out. And they're inexpensive too. You can get candy Cs (they use chrome instead of stainless or Ti) for about $50. You can get the Stainless (Candy S) for about $75. The ONLY issue with using them with MTB shoes, is that you may have to cut out a bit of your shoe ligs (tread) around the cleat to get it to engage fully into the pedal, dur to the treads hitting the platform of the pedal before it locks in. I have a dremmel tool, so it was a 2 minute operation.
Just a few comments I'd like to make about Crank Bros. I have both the Candy and the 'S' stainless steel eggbeater. I haven't had any problems fitting the cleats in my shoes (Nike and Shimano). I have a friend that had to cut his shoes (Sette) to fit the cleat width. The cleats are fairly soft like the Time MTB pedals. The Crank Bros and Time MTB cleats wear out faster than say a Shimano steel cleat. One of my friends prefers the eggbeaters but, switched back to Shimano because the cleats wear out too fast. He still saves eggbeaters for snow and extremely muddy cnditions. I would stay away from the 'Chrome' eggbeaters. The end cap is plastic on the 'chrome' and tends to break off. Actually I found no diffence from the Candy to the S eggbeater. I couldn't feel any additional support from the platform of the Candy. I suppose the Candy would feel more supportive if you were unclipped and resting your shoe on the pedal. Also, the bearings used to be different on the Candy and the S eggbeater. The inner 'bearing' on the Candy used to be a bushing, inner and outer bearings on the S were actual bearings. I don't know if they have changed this. The S eggbeater can be found for $50 online, if you know where to look.
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