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SLAP (Shoulder) Surgery - Done!

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Well, got it done yesterday. Kinda hard to type one handed. Unfortunately, the damage (from mult. dislocations) was worse than expected and they had to do a full on open joint surgery, rather than just athroscopy. Had get a bone graft to make up for chipped away areas. Recovery will be longer, and skiing may be much later this year. Oh well... Pain is pretty bad too, but I have good meds.
post #2 of 19
Well, you got it out of the way and heres hoping for a spectacular recovery!

That is a tough surgery. I had a friend that went through it on both shoulders. Give it rest and follow PT orders...

oh and then bending exercises are recommended.
post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powdr View Post
One week after surgery now.

Surgery started as a normal arthroscope. Once inside, damage was waaaaay too bad and the doc (Metcalf in PC) opted for open joint surgery. Got a bone graft and 3" scar to show for it. Still on pain meds, and the whole joint feels as bad as when it is popped out, but some slooooow progress is being made. Ski season is likely gone, but it had to be done. Turn away if you are squeamish:

Dang! Powdr. Tough news about the ski season. Hopefully you can still enjoy turns by March. Nice scar too!
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powdr View Post
Well, got it done yesterday. Kinda hard to type one handed. Unfortunately, the damage (from mult. dislocations) was worse than expected and they had to do a full on open joint surgery, rather than just athroscopy. Had get a bone graft to make up for chipped away areas. Recovery will be longer, and skiing may be much later this year. Oh well... Pain is pretty bad too, but I have good meds.
Had the same thing done to both shoulders about six years ago. I know exactly what you are going through. worst pain I ever felt and the first few days of rehab was a cruel reminder. My right shoulder was done a year later. Got a staff infection and they had to go back in about a week later to clean it out. Ate away some flesh around the shoulder joint. I have 45% disability and deminished range of motion. Was sick for weeks and that slowed the rehab. I was off work for three months and not to full capacity for five.

My advice to you, other than sympathy, is to do exactly what the doctor says and the physical therapist, well get a good one and follow the exercise routine religiously. I'd not think about skiing this year. A fall on that shoulder before it's completely healed would be disaster.

Good luck
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Saw doc today for my one week post op visit. He said things went well during surgery and that the range of motion was really good when he tested it out while I was still under (the thought of that makes my skin crawl). He aslo emphasized no skiing til at least Feb. Guess I'm gonna pass on that season pass this year. He too said that a fall on it prior to proper healing would be really bad news.
post #6 of 19
Well, all and all that's good news. I'm 4 months out myslef, and looking at a possible second surgery. The fact that you have good ROM now is great, but follow through, or risk losing it!!! In fact, even with PT, expect to lose some.

Do your PT religiously. No. Do it more than once a week on Sunday religously. Every day for the next 6 months. Every stinking day.

And get used to the pain meds - the acute phase of the pain is followed by a long chronic aching.

But, hey - I got bionic parts now!
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
I've always known that the real work starts after the surgery. I fully expect to work hard at it for a long time. Knowing that I can effect the outcome is really the only motivation I need to keep me going.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Somewhat of a setback after good progress the last two weeks: slipped on the new snow Monday just enough to jar my arm as I re-balanced and heard a 'crack' in the shoulder. X-rays show a small fracture near the screws. Doc will decide tomorrow whether to go back in. Sh*t!
post #9 of 19
Meds are good!

A while back I broke my shoulder (and dislocated the other one too, but I just ignored that minor detail). The emerge doc took a look at my x-rays and said he would have to confer with an expert. I crushed the Glenoid (lateral cup part of the scapula) that holds the femur, fractured the bottom of the shoulder blade (scapula) and broke my collar bone(clavicle). The expert said an operation would only make things worse, too many bits. I got to avoid an operation. Treatment consisted of wearing a sling for a while, and two oxycodone before bed to help me sleep for a few days.

BTW, you can work on skiing without poles for a while. Try not to fall on your shoulder!
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powdr View Post
Somewhat of a setback after good progress the last two weeks: slipped on the new snow Monday just enough to jar my arm as I re-balanced and heard a 'crack' in the shoulder.
I hate it when that happens! Good luck.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

BTW, you can work on skiing without poles for a while. Try not to fall on your shoulder!
Doc wont even let me near the slopes with or without poles until Feb. And yes, meds are my best friend at times.
post #12 of 19
I never asked my doc, so he couldn't say anything.
post #13 of 19
Friend of mine got this. He was out around 6 months, and I think skipped skiing for longer. But now no more dislocations. He almost has the ROM as before but not quite. Worth it for him so hang in there. I was kind of surprised how early they started him on exercises to keep it moving. I guess scar tissue can be a concern so follow the PT.
post #14 of 19
Sorry to hear of your setback Powdr. I had this same surgery in 2002 and have been pretty happy with the results. Therabands work great for rehab. They're inexpensive and you can take them anywhere.

I have really good range of motion again and aside from not being able to swim the butterfly, I can do pretty much anything.

Good luck with the healing. Keep a positive mental attitude and it will accelerate your recovery time.

~Anne~
post #15 of 19
I had SLAP surgery done in 2001. It was well worth it but it took a year to get back to normal.
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Well, progress has been slooooooow, but I actually woke up the last few mornings with a somewhat normal feeling in my arm. Of course as soon as I did anything requiring range of motion, I was reminded of my operation. But it did feel good to feel some progress. Seems like it's gonna take years...
post #17 of 19
It does take years... sorry.

I had each shoulder scoped, not the full slap. I also have dislocated both after surgery.

I still use those rubberbands to exercise... everyday.

I haven't dislocated for a couple of years, but just two weeks absent of PT and I feel it wobbling around in there. A few days absent of PT and my tight muscles get slack and my joints begin to hurt.

There is nothing religious about exercising your shoulder. You just simply do it every day or end up angry as all hell because it blew because you couldn't dedicate 20 minutes after breakfast.

That's just the way it is.

Pushups are the best long-term pain reliever. Once you regain ROM, do pushups everyday, and minor PT stuff and you'll never be sore.

Actually, I'm so hooked on pushups as pain reliever, that I even started doing them once 20 minutes after a dislocation on a ski resort floor. Jaws were dropping... I just couldn't articulate how good it felt.

Oh... and don't be discouraged by that. There is nothing wrong with exercising every day. Your wife will love it and... your posture will be stronger, giving you even more confidence when you enter a room full of strangers. Having a staunch chest rules. Good luck.
post #18 of 19
My right shoulder needs to get SLAPped and another part of the labrum is hosed too. I'm most likely putting the surgery off until late winter or early spring so I can get in some good turns and hopefully not dislocate between now and then.

Best wishes for a speedy recovery to others.

Has anybody used one of the chest strap arm tie things that holds your bicep within a few inches of your rib cage? A skier buddy of mine who had labrum surgery a while ago said he skied with one a few months after surgery.
post #19 of 19
Powdr during recovery it seemed to me that there was no way that I was going to recover my full range of motion but I did.

80% is easy, the last 20% is very difficult. Most of the reason being that you are back to being able to do most things your did prior to the injury at 80% and the last 20% is tedious and very painful. Most people give up. You need determination after about 6 months into this.
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