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Hydration

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
: I'm one of those people who doesn't naturally drink a lot. I have to remind myself to stay hydrated. With certain sports, like cycling, you have to stay hydrated to keep going. I didn't think the principle was quite as clear with skiing but my husband is always downing a gatorade before going out to ski, at lunch, etc. He insisted I do the same thing at one point...and it was a little surprising to me that I felt noticeably better, more energetic.
I always have water with me; I carry a camelback. I have to think about drinking most of the time...but it's really handy to have.
Does anyone else have any advice to offer on hydration? :
post #2 of 26
Here's a TPS article on hydration
It has great hydration information from a PSIA publication.

The bottom line is to hydrate often and more so in colder weather.
post #3 of 26
Couple sips on each lift ride---as a matter of course---takes the thought process out of the picture.
post #4 of 26
I am convinced that hydration is the single most important thing in every day life, but skiing especially.
The winter creates dry conditions in most of our environment. Even when I sleep, I know I sleep better if I drink water before I go to bed.

My trip to Abasin was a bit intimidating to me because I was suffering from a sinus infection just before the trip and I had never skied at that altitude.
The one piece of advice I took seriously is Hydrate!!!

I never suffered from the altitude at all, and know that the volume of water I took in, had a lot to do with that!

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate!!

But be careful taking a sip just before reading a post on this site.
post #5 of 26
To quote a certain company

"Hydrate or die"

Monitor SAC, they blow out a lot of camelbacks. Get a Snowbowl, Razor or Scorpion for inbounds skiing.
post #6 of 26
Nice article. It just seems odd that they came up with a nice round 15-10 minutes interval numbers. Maybe thats just for the chart. I read somewhere for racing MTB it was around 8 minutes. The BCA stash pack got rated as essential gear in skiing mag.
post #7 of 26
I would suggest to new skiers that they should avoid wearing backpack hydration systems at first; and not outside the jacket once comfortable with balance and lift access issues.

1. Less is more (enjoyable)
2. Balance is key
3. Always Pay Attention (esp. on/off lifts)
post #8 of 26
If you can't ski with a small camelback then maybe there are other issues at play. Some can be bulky but as long as you don't overfill them, they are fine.
post #9 of 26
I use a Camelback Slingshot.



Its nice and small and easily fits under my jacket. It has enough capacity for most days. You can always refill at lunch.

Hydrating does have one drawback. Every now and then you will need to dehydrate.
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by janesdad View Post
I would suggest to new skiers that they should avoid wearing backpack hydration systems at first; and not outside the jacket once comfortable with balance and lift access issues.

1. Less is more (enjoyable)
2. Balance is key
3. Always Pay Attention (esp. on/off lifts)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
If you can't ski with a small camelback then maybe there are other issues at play. Some can be bulky but as long as you don't overfill them, they are fine.
I have to say I agree with Janesdad on this one, for this particular forum.
As a beginner, I'd think that you'll be not too far from a lodge, taking frequent breaks any way, and may have balance issues, not to mention the issue of getting acclimated to getting on and off a chair.

As soon as balance and chair use is under your belt, a camelback is the way to go.
post #11 of 26
Well if you say so..... Your points are well-made.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post
I use a Camelback Slingshot.



Its nice and small and easily fits under my jacket. It has enough capacity for most days. You can always refill at lunch.

Hydrating does have one drawback. Every now and then you will need to dehydrate.
that's a great size for smaller resorts AND http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...&highlight=pee for those "dehydration" needs....:
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
The BCA stash pack got rated as essential gear in skiing mag.
Oopps, yes right, I forgot this was in the beginners forum. Probably don't want something this large. I did make an interesting discovery though. I bought a clearenced Camelbak classic for the bladder. However, the pack will fit nicely under a ski jacket. The straps are a bit tight for me. I wear a size 46 jacket. Might work well for a beginner, 70oz reservoir, around 20 bucks on e-bay.
post #14 of 26
This is a great thread for this forum!

But I believe that dehydration is actually LESS of a problem than is generally believed in our society. The bottled-water industry has promoted the idea and fear that unless you're constantly drinking water, you're going to perish.

One way to help with hydration in a healthy way is to do what most mammals (including myself) do: eat more veggies and fruits. I eat tons of lettuces, berries, apples, mixed greens, etc. and I don't need to drink as much water as a result -- and of course I'm less thirsty. Thirst is my guide.

Pretty good article on this: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi...&date=20070827
post #15 of 26
I switch time between working in a hospital and an outpatient clinic. The amount of people admitted diagnosed with dehydration would probably surprise you. I've seen several skiers and boarders admitted with dehydration and altitude sickness (not in WV). When you combine increased altitude, lack of conditioning and alcohol consumption, you are asking for trouble.:Indeed hydrate or die.

O yes also caffeine. And Sports drinks like Gatoraide, Red Bull, etc. are misused, they are designed to make you thirsty so you drink more water. People use many sports drinks to hydrate when they are intended to get you to drink more plain water. Not all sports drinks fall into this category. I tend to use the ones low in sodium. The higher sodium level the more water you should consume to balance it out.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
I have to say I agree with Janesdad on this one, for this particular forum.
As a beginner, I'd think that you'll be not too far from a lodge, taking frequent breaks any way, and may have balance issues, not to mention the issue of getting acclimated to getting on and off a chair.

As soon as balance and chair use is under your belt, a camelback is the way to go.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
Well if you say so..... Your points are well-made.
This is the voice of someone who takes 14 school kids skiing in a "get them started" program.

I make up for their dehydration by treating them to refreshment twice during the day.
They like the free refreshment, and I like to have an opportunity to take a head count and check on all of them.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotski View Post
I don't need to drink as much water as a result -- and of course I'm less thirsty. Thirst is my guide.
I've read that thirst is the first sign of dehydration. It took me 3 days to get over an episode this summer. I was drinking tons of water, I'm talking gallons/day, but only part of it stuck. So, I'd go to the washroom constantly and drink more and more water, but still felt thirsty -- all the time. I would get up twice at night to go to the washroom, but was still thirsty!

The thirst was quenched after three days. It is amazing at how much water you actually need to consume for the body to get topped up.

A few vegetables won't cut it. If you took all the veggies you eat per day, and put them in a juice maker, how many cups do you think you would get? 2 maybe?
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
I've read that thirst is the first sign of dehydration. It took me 3 days to get over an episode this summer. I was drinking tons of water, I'm talking gallons/day, but only part of it stuck. So, I'd go to the washroom constantly and drink more and more water, but still felt thirsty -- all the time. I would get up twice at night to go to the washroom, but was still thirsty!
Dude, this sounds more like borderline diabetes or OCD than dehydration. Only part of the water "stuck" because you have these two organs called kidneys. Your body was doing exactly what it was supposed to do when you kept pouring hydrogen dioxide into it.

Beginners need to not freak out about hydration. If you're thirsty, drink. Unless you have some kind of underlying medical condition, there's really no need to flip your gourd over hydration.
post #19 of 26
No diabetes here. Maybe just nuts.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
No diabetes here. Maybe just nuts.
Not as nuts as me! I don't mean to make light of dehydration, of course. I do think this is an interesting topic, worth airing on a number of fronts. How much is enough is a hard question to answer!
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotski View Post
Your body was doing exactly what it was supposed to do when you kept pouring hydrogen dioxide into it.
After spending my first summer out here living without air conditioning and doing a bunch of work outside in the afternoon, I know that when I've gotten "behind" it has taken me more than a whole day to catch up. Probably not three, but more than 24 hours. I think the key is to not just slam down straight water but drink a bit of juice/sweet/salty stuff. I was easily drinking 1.5-2 gallons a day all summer...every once in a while I'd forget and drink just a couple quarts and I'd be thirsty for days.
Quote:
Beginners need to not freak out about hydration. If you're thirsty, drink. Unless you have some kind of underlying medical condition, there's really no need to flip your gourd over hydration.
Agreed. Lewis Black had a great rant about how "dehydration" used to be called "thirsty" and the cure was to have a drink. I also think you are right on about the fruits and veggies.

I'll agree with those who suggested against the hydration pack for the n00bs. Too many other things to worry about, and I've seen more than a few people (not just n00bs either) hanging/getting whiplash from lifts as a result of packs over the years.
post #22 of 26
801Yes, I can see beginners getting hung up and falling off lifts and such. What drew me to this thread was the issue of hydration.

I believe the issue with over-advertised sports drinks went before Congress in 2002. They found the big picture is that kids were consuming sports drinks and staying hydrated.

I have found through my experiences that hydration factors are highly variable between individuals. There are many factors that play into proper hydration. My personal opinion is that conditioning is key.

Table 1. Heat Stress and Children
American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations regarding climatic heat stress and the exercising child and adolescent.
  1. The intensity of activities that last 15 minutes or more should be reduced whenever relative humidity, solar radiation, and air temperature are above critical levels. One way of increasing rest periods on a hot day is to substitute players frequently.
  2. At the beginning of a strenuous exercise program or after traveling to a warmer climate, the intensity and duration of exercise should be limited initially and then gradually increased during a period of 10 to 14 days to accomplish acclimatization to the heat. When such a period is not available, the length of time for participants during practice and competition should be curtailed.
  3. Before prolonged physical activity, the child should be well hydrated. During the activity, periodic drinking should be enforced: each 20 minutes, 150 mL (5 oz) of cold tap water or a flavored salted beverage for a child weighing 40 kg (88 lbs), and 250 mL (9 oz) for an adolescent weighing 60 kg (132 lbs), even if the child does not feel thirsty. Weighing before and after a training session can verify hydration status if the child is weighed wearing little or no clothing.
  4. Clothing should be light-colored and lightweight and limited to one layer of absorbent material to facilitate evaporation of sweat. Sweat-saturated garments should be replaced by dry garments. Rubberized sweat suits should never be used to produce loss of weight.
Used with permission of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Pediatrics. 2000;106:158-159.

I found this on hydration from the ACSM:
Table 2. Fluid Replacement for Adults
American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for optimal fluid replacement for adults during exercise.
  1. Individuals should consume a nutritionally balanced diet and drink adequate fluids during the 24-hour period before an event to promote proper hydration before exercise or competition.
  2. Individuals should drink about 500 mL (about 17 oz) of fluid about 2 hours before exercise to promote adequate hydration and allow time for excretion of excess ingested water.
  3. During exercise, athletes should start drinking early and at regular intervals in an attempt to consume fluids at a rate sufficient to replace all the water lost through sweating (i.e., body weight loss), or consume the maximal amount that can be tolerated.
  4. Ingested fluids should be cooler than ambient temperature (between 15 degrees and 22 degrees C [59 degrees and 72 degrees F]) and flavored to enhance palatability and promote fluid replacement. Fluids should be readily available and served in containers that allow adequate volumes to be ingested with ease and with minimal interruption of exercise.
  5. Addition of proper amounts of carbohydrates and/or electrolytes to a fluid replacement solution is recommended for exercise events of duration greater than 1 hour since it does not significantly impair water delivery to the body and may enhance performance. During exercise lasting less than 1 hour, there is little evidence of physiological or physical performance differences between consuming a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink and plain water.
  6. During intense exercise lasting longer than 1 hour, it is recommended that carbohydrates be ingested at a rate of 30-60 g per hour to maintain oxidation of carbohydrates and delay fatigue. This rate of carbohydrate intake can be achieved without compromising fluid delivery by drinking 600-1200 mL per hour of solutions containing 4 to 8 percent carbohydrates (g/100 mL). The carbohydrates can be sugars (glucose or sucrose) or starch (e.g., maltodextrin).
  7. Inclusion of sodium (0.5-0.7 g/L of water) in the rehydration solution ingested during exercise lasting longer than 1 hour is recommended since it may be advantageous in enhancing palatability and promoting fluid retention, while possibly preventing hyponatremia.
Used with permission of the American College of Sports Medicine. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1996;28:i-vii.
Reprinted with permission of Texas Medicine and the Texas Medical Association.
post #23 of 26
Numbers six and seven on the adult list pretty closely resemble what I find myself doing in real life, but I'm definitely someone who has to make a conscious effort to do it or else I'll just end up super parched and unhappy, which sometime turns into a headache.
post #24 of 26
Sept 11, 2007

Hi:

I'm all for hydration. Well hydrated muscles perform at maximum capacity and efficiency. With that said, I must point out that "too much of a good thing" can occur with too much intake of water. This condition is known as "Hyponatremia" or "low blood sodium" and in the extreme can result in brain swelling and death. (It has occurred sporadically in marathons, especially on hot, humid days). I was first made aware of this condition when I participated in the New York City Marathon a few years ago. An official New York City Marathon warning was included in our race packet as to the dangers of "Hyponatremia" due to over drinking. I DON'T EXPECT it to happen in skiing, but we should be aware of this dangerous condition. I didn't know about it until that NYC Marathon and suspect that in some previous marathons, I probably suffered very mild cases, since I sweat profusely.

Click below for NYC Marathon website:
http://www.nycmarathon.org/entrantin...seservices.php

Cheers,

CP
post #25 of 26
Hyponatremia, why Gatorade isn't always a bad thing. (though admittedly never the best)
post #26 of 26
One of the benefits of hydration is that it does help prevent altitude headaches. I've had those when I go out to Colorado from my low altitude of 1000 feet up to 11,000. They aren't fun. Hydration helps keep them at bay.
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