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Proper New SKi Care

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I just received 07 Head Monster 77 skis. Needless to say I am stoked to finally receive them! They were shipped thru REI and the entire transaction was flawless. When I opened the box that the skis are in I realize that the "Dodo" who packaged it did not even take the time to wrap them or protect them in any way! They did have 2, 1 inch bands of shrink wrap holding them together but thats it!

Anyway, after inspection, they seem fine except for some minor scratches that appear on the base of the skis. I can only assume that these were there when they shipped them or they were created during shipping.

Do I have reason to be paranoid besides the obvious asthetic reasons? Any performance issues? Can I assume that once I get the ski properly tuned in a ski shop(waxed, etc...) the scratches will become a non-issue, both asthetically and performance wise? Thanks for induldging my paranoia!:
post #2 of 25
Depends on how deep those scratches are. If they need to have a base grind, I would return them.
post #3 of 25
Without seeing them it's hard to say, BUT the larger issue is the proper way to prepare your new skis. Look in the tune section here for a welth of info. Suffice it to say that most here would recommend more than one waxing at the shop before skiing. If you are really into skiing and want to take care of your skis the best that you can, either be prepared to spends a bunch of money at a shop, OR, learn to do some basic ski prep on your own. Lots of helpful hints in the sticky on the tune forum, and plenty of help with tuning equipment purchases and tuning process. And the best part is tuning your own stuff is ......... FUN..............
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
Without seeing them it's hard to say, BUT the larger issue is the proper way to prepare your new skis. Look in the tune section here for a welth of info. Suffice it to say that most here would recommend more than one waxing at the shop before skiing. If you are really into skiing and want to take care of your skis the best that you can, either be prepared to spends a bunch of money at a shop, OR, learn to do some basic ski prep on your own. Lots of helpful hints in the sticky on the tune forum, and plenty of help with tuning equipment purchases and tuning process. And the best part is tuning your own stuff is ......... FUN..............
Great advice for anyone with new skis.
post #5 of 25
For recreational skiers, that aren't getting timed in a course, a couple scratches on the base is going to be a non issues. It does depend how deep they are, but somehow I'd be suprised if they're more than a mm deep. Completely beat bases become an issue because they weaken the ski, but other than that, you should be fine with a couple scratches.

Take pics so we can see the damage.


Other than that, wax em a few times, starting with the coldest temp wax, and moving to the warmest that you have. I wouldn't screw with a factory tune too much until you feel how they ski, but I would detune the tips and tails to your liking.
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
I think I figured it out...i don't believe that it is damage after all. I think that since they are new skis that they might be minor scratches from stone grinding? I put a few layers of high-flourinated paste wax just to see what it would do and they all dissappeared. There are one or two slightly larger scratches but they are not big at all(def. no more than 1mm) and the area is completely smooth now. I think they are from stone grinding as well.

Once I get the time I will take them to the shop to get properly tuned and prepped since they are new.
post #7 of 25
Did the scratches look anything like these (Or were they a few isolated, inconsequential ones)?:



Your description sounds like you filled the base structure with wax. Ideally, you want the wax in the bases, not on them and brushing off the excess to free the structure which reduces suction and improves glide. This is contrary to what you might think you get with a smooth, mirror finished base.

Here's one of many threads about base structuring and other factors.

It is also very likely they are properly factory tuned and as mentioned multiple waxings after good base cleaning, hot scraping or both is all you need initially.
post #8 of 25
Regarding the use of fluoro waxes, they should be applied over straight paraffin/hydrocarbon base wax to avoid drying out the bases.
post #9 of 25
so if i have a brand new pair of skis in plastic wrap, when i get them mounted, i should also get them properly tuned up?
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jvhowube View Post
so if i have a brand new pair of skis in plastic wrap, when i get them mounted, i should also get them properly tuned up?
Read this:http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=55396

and this:http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=34227

and all the other threads in that section.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
So now that I see I was not suppose to put on a fluoro glide wax on the base until a good coat of base wax goes on. So now what? Should I be somehow removing the fluoro wax so I can take the skis to a shop to get the bindings mounted and properly tuned(base wax, etc...)

Alpinord, the bases do look somewhat like that(though not as pronounced) From what I can tell(and due to my untrained eye, that is a lot) those bases shown in the pic look fine. Don't they?
post #12 of 25
Skier-X85, the images were of an aggressive base structure for spring conditions and ran great after adding a couple coats of liquid base and then low fluoro. Your base structure is probably less 'grooved', more like this image of 5 year skis with a base weld??:



I can't recall the correct percentages but a low fluoro is less than 5% added to hydrocarbon and high fluoro is probably less than 10%. I was a little surprised to read you used HF in a paste versus an expected LF. Anyway, it's not the end of the world and your skis won't disintegrate.....and there was probably a coat of wax on before. It is less than ideal, however, and if you're going to have them waxed at the shop tell them to hot scrape them once or twice, before final waxing.

FWIW, in the time you drive them top the shop, you could do them yourself.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post



FWIW, in the time you drive them to the shop, you could do them yourself.
Hint alert.
post #14 of 25
Moi???? : :
post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 
This is the stuff that I used...http://www.norwaysports.com/swix-f4-...p-paste-250ml/

I suspect that the skis might have had a very thin layer of wax on them as I could see a subtle difference in the sheen of the base at the very top where the tip curves up and the wax was not applied. (I presume)

Anyway, I would love to do this stuff myself but time and money constraints
keep me from doing so. So now, I just basically want to take the skis to a shop and get them tuned correctly. Is the way to remove the wax I put on and any previous wax called hot scraping? Then they could clean the base and apply a correct base coat for maximum care of the base of the ski? Sorry for all of the questions. I am a newbie to this whole ski tuning thing!:

By the way, how many coats of "base" do I want to put on? I have heard that the more wax for new skis the better.
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Also, how can wax "dry out" the base of a ski and am I in danger of it? :
post #17 of 25

Relax

It's not that big of an issue for you to be concerned at this point. Over time, if you used only fluoros, then it could become a problem. My initial comment should have been clearer and was to make you aware of this, not generate stress.

Hot scraping is one method to clean the bases as it pulls dirt, grime, old wax, etc off the base. Using a soft wax, you drip then iron in and immediately scrape while still warm. If my kid can do it, so can you or anyone.


Edited by Alpinord - 9/23/11 at 8:30am
post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Haha...i catch your drift...thanx for the help:
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skier-X85 View Post
This is the stuff that I used...http://www.norwaysports.com/swix-f4-...p-paste-250ml/

I suspect that the skis might have had a very thin layer of wax on them as I could see a subtle difference in the sheen of the base at the very top where the tip curves up and the wax was not applied. (I presume)

Anyway, I would love to do this stuff myself but time and money constraints
keep me from doing so. So now, I just basically want to take the skis to a shop and get them tuned correctly. Is the way to remove the wax I put on and any previous wax called hot scraping? Then they could clean the base and apply a correct base coat for maximum care of the base of the ski? Sorry for all of the questions. I am a newbie to this whole ski tuning thing!:

By the way, how many coats of "base" do I want to put on? I have heard that the more wax for new skis the better.
Skier-x85, with all due respect to your time and financial constraints, an investment in the basic tools of the trade now will most likely save you money in the long run. I know that it kinda depends on how often you ski and how often you tune BUT, the prevailing opinion here ,I believe, is that the skis should be waxed about every 2 days skiing or more. Different opinions. Don't know how much your shop charges but the ones around here ain't cheep especially if you are waxing and going over the edges with a stone 15-20x a season. Plus when you do it yourself, after some learning curve, you know that it was done right. I can donate an iron if you want to start . Send me a PM

Mark
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skier-X85 View Post
Haha...i catch your drift...thanx for the help:
You're in good hands here .

By HINT I was meaning to take Alpinord's advice and get into waxing and tuning at a level you can afford.

Waxing is fairly inexpensive and not a tough chore. Tuning takes more of both expenditures but still way cheaper than having a shop do it for you .

An alternative is having a good shop person .put some nice edges on there and you buy a few simple tools and maintain that tune by polishing it . You can maintain a good tune all season that way. if you don't hit rocks. The money you save in waxing you could put into some tuning tools, an iron and a brush or two.
post #21 of 25
I just got new skis with bindings too. I ordered them through evogear and the skis are fine. However, one the back bindings has a big dent on it. I think it happened while they were packaging it. Im not going to send them back because i know it wont affect the performance of the binging and ill probably mess them up even more and they werent that expensive. But dude, if i had a scratch even as little as yours on my ski i would ship them along with myself to wherever they came from and kick everyones ass there.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
Everyone, thanx for the advice...I think that I will get into self tuning my own skis. I am beginning to see the light and find that it will not only be less expensive ,but more fun. : As for the scratch vwthng. I believe I over reacted in the beginning and after doing some research I found that the scratching that is there is the structure that they built into the ski. Thanx for the support though...
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwthng View Post
But dude, if i had a scratch even as little as yours on my ski i would ship them along with myself to wherever they came from and kick everyones ass there.
I'd characterize this as over reacting to a insignificant issue. As much as I think we should get a 'perfect' product delivered to us, in the big picture so what? If you think about how we get bent out of shape over minor irrelevant (and easily fixable) issues and the resources burned up and wasted deal with bruised egos, it's even more important to turn the other cheek, ignore it or fix and move on.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skier-X85 View Post
Everyone, thanx for the advice...I think that I will get into self tuning my own skis. I am beginning to see the light and find that it will not only be less expensive ,but more fun. :
Yeah! Another heathen seeing the light! (Some days it feels like we're out doing missionary work converting heathens.) It gets easier and more enjoyable the more you do it, it's positive therapy, protects your investment and useful life of your gear....and gets you more connected to your boards
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skier-X85 View Post
Everyone, thanx for the advice...I think that I will get into self tuning my own skis. I am beginning to see the light and find that it will not only be less expensive ,but more fun. : As for the scratch vwthng. I believe I over reacted in the beginning and after doing some research I found that the scratching that is there is the structure that they built into the ski. Thanx for the support though...
I just picked up some supplies to start waxing (Iron/Wax/Brushes/Scraper) with an eye towards keeping it affordable.

If you want a list of what I bought and where I got it from drop me a PM. I picked it up from a couple people who post here and split it between the stores due to inventory issues and to see how the service was through both places. Both shipped in less than 24 hours (amazing!) so thus far things are going well.
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