EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Running your skis through a base extruder?
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Running your skis through a base extruder?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have a pair of skis... their bases look like they've been skied down a scree field full of cheese graters... mostly because they have... there are one or two smaller gore shots but probably 30 ptex gouges. I no longer have access to a shope and doing this whole thing with drip ptex sounds awfull.

QUESTION: Wouldn't it be cheaper to have the mega-resort rental store run my ski through their extruder/tuning machine than to pay hourly for a shop to hand repair with a ptex gun and planer/sureform/scraper?

(these are 04/05 Gotama 183s)
post #2 of 12
I hate running the extruder...the skids i've used are very temperamental machines. If you search for the posts I've made, you'll come across a nasty accident I had with the skid. Basically, was extruding the base on a snowboard and the heated head got stuck...the emergency release didn't release the pressure and I had to manually turn the valve down to release the pressure on the board...by the time that happened, the board was fried all the way through and shot.

Not to scare you or anything lol
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Summit View Post
I have a pair of skis... their bases look like they've been skied down a scree field full of cheese graters... mostly because they have... there are one or two smaller gore shots but probably 30 ptex gouges. I no longer have access to a shope and doing this whole thing with drip ptex sounds awfull.

QUESTION: Wouldn't it be cheaper to have the mega-resort rental store run my ski through their extruder/tuning machine than to pay hourly for a shop to hand repair with a ptex gun and planer/sureform/scraper?
The cheaper way is to DIY. Here's one base repair thread and references a page on my site. (Note the core shot was from trying to tiptoe through a surprise scree field at a high rate of speed. : )
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelloBoy View Post
I hate running the extruder...the skids i've used are very temperamental machines. If you search for the posts I've made, you'll come across a nasty accident I had with the skid. Basically, was extruding the base on a snowboard and the heated head got stuck...the emergency release didn't release the pressure and I had to manually turn the valve down to release the pressure on the board...by the time that happened, the board was fried all the way through and shot.

Not to scare you or anything lol
that would be AWESOME b/c then the shop would have to buy me replacement skis
post #5 of 12
Base extruder....good for a rental fleet. (And even then, lots of people would rather inhale burning drippy plastic than use the darn things.)
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
The cheaper way is to DIY. Here's one base repair thread and references a page on my site. (Note the core shot was from trying to tiptoe through a surprise scree field at a high rate of speed. : )
DIY would be the cheapest but would be very time consuming... if I had access to my old shop's tools I could easily spend an hour and a half on the skis
post #7 of 12
I wouldn't consider an 1 1/2 hrs as time consuming. (I'd bet it would take longer, BTW.)

How much time would it take you to load up the skis, drive and waste gas, drop off, return home, discuss, leave, check in, drive back, pickup up and drive home, and earn the money to pay for the repairs? (or what ever combination of events actual occur).
post #8 of 12
DIY base repair is silly. Unless you have a stone in your basement, you are going to a shop one way or another.
post #9 of 12
After a certain level, I'd agree with you but not as an absolute statement.

Quote:
I also believe that the aforementioned attitude and misconception, is one of many that contributes to people's intimidation & confusion level about gear care and maintenance.
post #10 of 12
I suppose you can get mediocre results at home in a pinch, but why bother? There are plenty of shops out there willing to do the work for a modicum of cash. Several hours of an employee's time and a quality finish typically costs less than one hour at the local car dealership. If ski shops started charging a more sane price for their time, I'd think DIY base repair made more sense.

Rilling bar? Other than you selling them, why would any sane person buy such a thing? Its a bit like driving a modern car and buying a dwell meter, or a set of Whitworth wrenches.

/yeah, I think I've got a few rilling tools stashed away in a box someplace from years ago.
//yup, i can measure dwell too. Actually did not too long ago on a project car.

edit: And don't get me wrong, I'm not anti DIY. I'm the guy with the homebuilt ignition system and engine management system in his project car. I'm also the guy with a homebuilt CNC mill. I think doing a weld or fixing a few gouges in a base at home is a worthy pursuit, I just don't see the OP as someone who needs to do it to say he's done it, and thats really the best reason for doing it at home when shops are as cheap as they are.
post #11 of 12
One person's 'mediocre' may be 'more than adequate' for someone else....or 'one person's floor, may be someone else's ceiling' (or the reverse, for that matter).

For some, it gets down to other priorities rule, expense, convenience, timing and time determine whether or not you blow it off, deal with it yourself or get it to a pro...or someone who isn't. One huge advantage with DIYing is you can deal with minor stuff when it fits your schedule and when dropping off skis or snowboards doesn't work for your schedule or simply isn't an option. There are many people on this forum who live in areas where a ski shop isn't on every corner or is non-existent.

Also, there are many individuals who are highly skilled in other trades where repairing and flattening a piece of plastic can be done in their sleep. It's not brain surgery and ski repair & tuning is journeymen skills to them.



Additionally, even though we can measure to tight tolerances, most of us humans are imperfect and truly cannot feel any life changing difference of a perfectly flat base or perfect repair. For some of us, me included, a 'mediocre' repair is just fine for a given situation and we know it......and don't pretend otherwise, nor want to piss away time, energy and resources, unnecessarily.......even though we wouldn't object to 'perfection' and do appreciate it, along with people in its pursuit.

Skiing and maintenance should be more about fun and practical performance for the individual's needs, rather than 'my bases are flatter than yours'. This is a recreational pursuit, BTW, and different and persoanl for everyone.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
One huge advantage with DIYing is you can deal with minor stuff when it fits your schedule and when dropping off skis or snowboards doesn't work for your schedule or simply isn't an option
Yeah, but a couple core shots and a few hours worth of gouges in a base aren't really minor. Tedious would be the best description of such a job. The OP clearly knows how to do the work, and pretty clearly says it doesn't sound like a fun task.
Quote:
Also, there are many individuals who are highly skilled in other trades where repairing and flattening a piece of plastic can be done in their sleep. It's not brain surgery and ski repair & tuning is journeymen skills to them.
No, its unskilled labor any monkey could do. The problem is that in order to do it with a quality finish, the monkey needs to be standing in front of big machine tool, preferably imported from Europe. The other problem is that the work doesn't have the rewards of crafting a beautiful moulding...its just plain tedious.
Quote:
Additionally, even though we can measure to tight tolerances, most of us humans are imperfect and truly cannot feel any life changing difference of a perfectly flat base or perfect repair.
"Perfectly flat" makes less difference in practice than the correct surface finish. And in my experience, the metrology of skis is pretty limited anyways when compared with anything other than woodworking. The surface finish is what you cannot duplicate at home...this is my point. Depending on snow conditions, having the right surface finish can make a difference noticeable to all of us. If you live someplace where the snow isn't always fine, dry, cold, and from the sky, the right finish can make life more fun. And thats what skiing is about.
Quote:
even though we wouldn't object to 'perfection' and do appreciate it, along with people in its pursuit.
The OP clearly isn't looking for perfection...he's talking about extruders. Its pretty clear that this is a thread about expedience and getting a decent result with pretty low effort and cash outlay. The best way to do that? Pay some shop to do it that has the equipment and the guy whose job it is to tediously fill in a billion little divots in a base.
Quote:
Skiing and maintenance should be more about fun and practical performance for the individual's needs, rather than 'my bases are flatter than yours'.
I agree completely. It might make sense to do the base repair at home if you really want to, you are really bored, or you are flat broke, but it makes zero sense trying to finish that job yourself with silly tools from the last century when you can stop by a shop and have them run one or two passes across the proper tool. Cost: negligible...and as to "shops not being local", not many hills worth skiing at lack a shop to do this work.

The pleasure and value of doing something oneself is related to the skill and care required for the task. I spend most of my free time working on DIY projects, mostly related to things that make lots of noise and burn lots of fuel...but I don't lube or oil my daily driver. That would be tedious, dirty, and a poor use of my time when CheapLube does it for twenty bucks.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Running your skis through a base extruder?