New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

liquid metal

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My skeptical atennae go up when Head refers to liquid metal. Is there really such a substance? Or is it just basically regular metal?

How is it produced? Why isn't it used in many products? I know Head has a copyright on the term liquid metal. But do they hold a patent on some process or product which would benefit humankind in more ways than just helping skis work a little better?

If one had identical skis except for the "liquid metal" in one pair and not the other, how much of a difference would one experience? Would one be able to pick out which ski was which if they looked identical?

I am not intending to bash Head with these questions. I'm probably going to purchase a pair of IM78s because regardless of what the truth is regarding liquid metal, IM78s are, by most all accounts, wonderful skis. I am just curious.
post #2 of 14
I guess quick silver was already taken.
post #3 of 14
There is actual science behind the concept. "Liquid Metal" is just a name dreamed up to brand the implementation by Head. Many years ago it piezo electric technology employed by K2, and before that...

Most of materials technology results from the aerospace industry which is later adopted into recreational applications when the price point drops. Carbon fiber, composites, etc. Were all developed to reduce weight while providing strength and longevity equal to or better than common metals.

It's about physics and molecular bonding. Steel isn't really solid. The molecules are densely packed and tightly "bonded", yet they still "move". Actually they vibrate. As energy is added (heat) the molecules relate differently to those around them and the material goes through changes in physical properties. Enough energy and the metal eventually becomes "molten".

Liquid metal is Head's adaptation of specific metal compounds to absorb vibration (energy) and physically alter (dampen\stiffen) the ski.

Is a Monroe shock absorber the same as another just because they look the same on the outside? Maybe. Maybe not. Depends on the valving inside and the viscosity of the fluid used.

Just the same as some shocks will demonstrably alter handling of your car, so will internal ski construction. Better or worse, significant or insignificant are all relative to the user's perspective.

That was basically a long-winded way of saying Head has nothing here that is going to save mankind. :-) Nor, did they invent the technology being employed.
post #4 of 14
From the source of all authoritative information, Wikipedia...

Quote:
Liquidmetal and Vitreloy are commercial names of a series of amorphous metal alloys developed by a California Institute of Technology research team, now marketed by a firm that the team organized called Liquidmetal Technologies. Liquidmetal alloys combine a number of desirable material features, including high tensile strength, excellent corrosion resistance, very high elasticity and excellent anti-wearing characteristics, while also being able to be heat-formed in processes similar to thermoplastics. Although only introduced for commercial applications in 2003, Liquidmetal is already finding a number of uses as varied as golf clubs to the covers of cell phones.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the information medmarko and Voltron. I should have thought to check Wikipedia.
post #6 of 14

All of the above...

...as a (ahem) Masters road bikie, ski racer, tennis player, gear freak, and wannabe composite materials engineer, I think LM is cool stuff. For GS, I'm currently racing on Head IGS RD and for tennis, Head Metallix2. A lot of people diss Head because they're always coming out with the next New Thang. Well...I've hit with a million tennis rackets, ridden a bunch of bikes, and probably owned over 100 tennis rackets, and I know when technology is just 3-D glasses and when it really works. I think Head's stuff is really progressive, and their stuff works great for me. Head skis have always had a reputation for being easy to bend lengthwise but very rigid torsionally. It's their way of putting together a ski that enters a turn easily but sticks like glue thereafter. My take is that, in addition to sidecut, and so forth, you need some stuff like LM to make it happen...work for me...
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
There is actual science behind the concept. "Liquid Metal" is just a name dreamed up to brand the implementation by Head. Many years ago it piezo electric technology employed by K2, and before that...

Most of materials technology results from the aerospace industry which is later adopted into recreational applications when the price point drops. Carbon fiber, composites, etc. Were all developed to reduce weight while providing strength and longevity equal to or better than common metals.

It's about physics and molecular bonding. Steel isn't really solid. The molecules are densely packed and tightly "bonded", yet they still "move". Actually they vibrate. As energy is added (heat) the molecules relate differently to those around them and the material goes through changes in physical properties. Enough energy and the metal eventually becomes "molten".

Liquid metal is Head's adaptation of specific metal compounds to absorb vibration (energy) and physically alter (dampen\stiffen) the ski.

Is a Monroe shock absorber the same as another just because they look the same on the outside? Maybe. Maybe not. Depends on the valving inside and the viscosity of the fluid used.

Just the same as some shocks will demonstrably alter handling of your car, so will internal ski construction. Better or worse, significant or insignificant are all relative to the user's perspective.

That was basically a long-winded way of saying Head has nothing here that is going to save mankind. :-) Nor, did they invent the technology being employed.
Liquidmetal was not dreamed up by Head. First used in golf clubs in 1998 in the sports area. It is Liquidmetal Technologies product.

Liquid metal does not stiffen the ski, Head's Intelligence technology is more akin to Piezo electric gizmo's not Liquid metal that affects flex.

READ:

http://www.head.com/ski/technology.p...ag=liquidmetal


http://www.head.com/ski/technology.p...g=intelligence
post #8 of 14
What Atomicman said about piezoelectric stiffening and "i" tech, also note that Head seems to have discontinued both i and LM in its latest line of high end tennis racquets, which historically have introduced new Head technology about 2-3 years before the skis. Hmmm.
post #9 of 14
I really prefer Black Metal. If none of that's available then maybe some European Death Metal like Dismember. Then again, you really can't beat old Thrash Metal like Celtic Frost.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
I really prefer Black Metal. If non of that's available then maybe some European Death Metal like Dismember. Then again, you really can't beat old Threash Metal like Celtic Frost.

"Darker than the darkest dark, times infinity"
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
What Atomicman said about piezoelectric stiffening and "i" tech, also note that Head seems to have discontinued both i and LM in its latest line of high end tennis racquets, which historically have introduced new Head technology about 2-3 years before the skis. Hmmm.
I play with a Head Flexpoint Radical MP Liquidmetal Racquest. I demoed the new Microgel Raqdical MP 2 weeks ago & hated it.

No comparison for me anyway. the flexpoint LM was far superior.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
Liquidmetal was not dreamed up by Head. First used in golf clubs in 1998 in the sports area. It is Liquidmetal Technologies product.

Liquid metal does not stiffen the ski, Head's Intelligence technology is more akin to Piezo electric gizmo's not Liquid metal that affects flex.

READ:

http://www.head.com/ski/technology.p...ag=liquidmetal


http://www.head.com/ski/technology.p...g=intelligence
Primarily I was responding to the question of why Head wasn't sharing their technology with the rest of the world. Basically not theirs.

I stand corrected. My familiarity with LM isn't with Head, but NASA/DOD applications of LMT's technologies which are used for stronger, less brittle materials applications and for vibration dampening, so I assumed Head was using a structural LM sheet for the same purpose. I didn't remember seeing the registered insignia on Head's topsheet and thought they were using the generic term Liquid Metal and a variant of LM's technology in conjunction with the chip.

So, I'll follow the links to find out Head's use of the technology. I did demo the LM SL/iSL a couple of seasons ago and thought they were awesome skis. Guess I should have learned a little more about the ski and not just enjoyed the ride.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
Primarily I was responding to the question of why Head wasn't sharing their technology with the rest of the world. Basically not theirs.

I stand corrected. My familiarity with LM isn't with Head, but NASA/DOD applications of LMT's technologies which are used for stronger, less brittle materials applications and for vibration dampening, so I assumed Head was using a structural LM sheet for the same purpose. I didn't remember seeing the registered insignia on Head's topsheet and thought they were using the generic term Liquid Metal and a variant of LM's technology in conjunction with the chip.

So, I'll follow the links to find out Head's use of the technology. I did demo the LM SL/iSL a couple of seasons ago and thought they were awesome skis. Guess I should have learned a little more about the ski and not just enjoyed the ride.
Ya know how email & posts come across without emotion or expression. sidn't mean for it to come across harsh.

No worries, just simply wanted to post the info!
post #14 of 14
For the whole scoop go to www.liquidmetal.com

Interesting stuff.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion