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Can you find the United States on a map?

Poll Results: Do you believe the statistic - "Recent polls show a fifth of Americans can't locate the U.S. on

 
  • 48% (12)
    True
  • 52% (13)
    False
25 Total Votes  
post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
POLL

Do you believe the statistic mentioned in the question "Recent polls show a fifth of Americans can't locate the U.S. on a map." which was asked of Miss Teen USA South Carolina Lauren Caitlin Upton by the 18 year old judge Aimee Teegarden is true or false?


A) Why do you believe that this statistic is true or false?


B) Quiz 1 - How geographically literate are you? Post your score and/or comment on the state of geographic literacy in your area of the world. 2006 National Geographic-Roper Survey of Geographic Literacy, click on Test Yourself for short version of the survey at http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ro.../findings.html

C) Quiz 2 - Miss Teen USA South Carolina tests your knowledge in this Geography Pop Quiz www.people.com/people/quiz/0,,20053640,00.html Post your score if you dare.



D) If you know of any other surveys other than the National Geographic-Roper Survey of Geographic Literacy that ask this type of U.S. location question, please post the info as I am curious as to which current polls that show a fifth of American's can't locate the U.S. on a map.

The "Miss Teen USA 2007 - Miss South Carolina "geographically challenged" but not a skier" http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=58117 thread piqued my interest regarding whether or not this statistic was invented by the Miss Teen USA organization and/or the 18 year old judge Aimee Teegarden.



The National Geographic poll showed the percentage of young Americans age 18-24 who could not locate the U.S. on a map in a multiple choice question was 6% in 2006, 11% in 2002 and 18% in 1988.

2006 survey http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ro.../findings.html

2002 survey www.nationalgeographic.com/geosurvey2002/



The detailed report from the 2006 National Geographic-Roper Survey of Geographic Literacy of young Americans age 18-24 is an interesting read http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ro...gLitsurvey.pdf

* Half of young Americans can't find New York on a map of the continental U.S. with the state outlines.

* Only 37% of young Americans can find Iraq on a Middle East map—though U.S. troops have been there since 2003.

* Only 12% of young Americans can find Afghanistan on an Asia map.

* 21% of young Americans could not find the Pacific Ocean, the world’s largest body of water

* 20% of young Americans think Sudan is in Asia. (It's the largest country in Africa.)

* 48% of young Americans believe the majority population in India is Muslim.

* The average young American got 54% of the 53 questions correct.




To see the map used in the 2002 National Geographic-Roper Survey of Geographic Literacy



which was shown in context on a 11" x 17" card with the U.S. location & Pacific Ocean location questions go to


Question 11 of 20 http://web.archive.org/web/200212050...estion_11.html

Take a minute and look at the map below. The United States of America is shown by what number on the map?

10
15
46
25
I Don’t Know


Question 17 of 20 http://web.archive.org/web/200212050...estion_17.html

Take a minute and look at the map below. The Pacific Ocean is shown by what number on the map?

30
40
50
60
I Don’t Know




EDUCATION STATISTICS

SAT scores by state: www.collegeboard.com/press/releases/185222.html

Graduation rates by state: "Diplomas Count: Ready for What" by Education Week www.edweek.org/ew/toc/2007/06/12/index.html
post #2 of 23
Welcome to the world of No Child Left Behind. Since there is no geography or civics measured for NCLB the focus has completely left that area as well as in the arts, PE, and vocational education. This is reflected by the regular decline in test scores in these areas.
post #3 of 23
Not knowing the name of a river or an island thousands of miles from your home is one thing. Not being able to pick out your own country on a map is pretty sad.
post #4 of 23
I find it difficult to believe given the map shown. My first thought was that it really depended on the map given. If there was no outline then maybe.

The first survey doesn't give post your results at the end, does it? I think I missed four or five. I only got three out of seven right on the second quiz::

Here's an easy one.
post #5 of 23
im not surprised. i had a girl in my 8th grade class who didnt know where alaska was. We had to put a givin place on a blank map and she got alaska and put it somewhere in Antarctica. I know that Alaska isn't as big as the US but come on everyone knows where Alaska is.
post #6 of 23
There can be many excuses for not knowing. There should be no excuse for our school systems to have not put it before them.
Who's to blame ?

Dumb kids ?
Poor teaching ?
Inattentive students ?
Attention to core classes and less attention to Social Studies, Geography and the Arts ?
Patents too busy with themselves to remember their responsibilities toward the education of their children ?
Not being supportive of teachers' needs in getting our kids a good education ?


My thoughts are the last two. Teachers offer themselves to us in support of our kids' education and it is up to us to get the kids to spend the time and attention needed to learn basic information to be ready for intense classroom expectancies in college.
I only ride herd on one last teenager (14) and he has been a handful keeping him on track . A experienced as I am (three in their 20's)dealing with getting kids to study he seems to follow the impulses of my attention to his school work.He tends to slack when I become too immersed in making a living for us.
We got to be vigilant as parents to help these kids . Some can do very well with little supervision but I think they are very much in the minority.
post #7 of 23
20% of the people in the US are not from the US. The kids are probably looking at a map in school, but the parents just need to worry about finding jobs, etc. They need to find their apartments...
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowphat View Post
20% of the people in the US are not from the US. The kids are probably looking at a map in school, but the parents just need to worry about finding jobs, etc. They need to find their apartments...
If you make babies . Then their lives are your priority. Poor kids can excel as well as rich kids with the right motivation and caring parenting.
post #9 of 23
Well, I got six out of seven right ("Crown Cartographer") on Lauren's People magazine quiz. I didn't know which Canary Island was closest to the US coast. I got lucky on some (most?) of them though. Number of islands in Indonesia? Which river to cross from Buenos Aeries?

Edit: I got 18 of 20 on the National Geographic quiz.
post #10 of 23
I got 15/20 on the national geographic quiz, I was surprised I didnt do better
post #11 of 23
doesn't everyone know that the U.S. is in the middle?
post #12 of 23
Maybe one day the debate about financing education in the U.S will seize.

"I can't believe baseball players make several million a year and teachers only make a couple grand."

Are you willing to give your kid a 100 dollar bill to fiance the day's class and lunch?

Get over it guys... you pay crap in taxes for education, and your government spends it elsewhere. why do you think people are taking it upon themselves to homschool their kids?

I've only visited a dozen countries or so, but I have worked the educational field in a few. I'm pretty much rolling my eyes at this thread. The educational industry is the beginning of the end of the american super-power.

You might as well just get used to it if you're not willing to take it upon yourselves to change it.

I would, but I've already been outsourced. The american educational system can't afford my education and I can't afford to teach there. How fricking ironic is that?

You guys realize that your average public teacher is taking home less than a grand a month, right? You guys get that? And- you also get that your average education graduate is seeking work elsewhere and that schools are hiring non-trained/educated personnel? You get that right?

20% of american graduates can't locate the U.S. on a world map.

No ****... neither can the teachers. What the hell did you expect?
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
You guys realize that your average public teacher is taking home less than a grand a month, right?

I'm not American, but this sounds like BS to me. I think some people have gone so over the top with their anti-Americanism, that they want to... and will believe everything negative they hear about the States. Its definitely not perfect, and I'll still take my native Canada anyday, but people have to stop and realize that there is a reason why thousands and thousands of South Africans, Iraqis and Asians are leaving their homelands for the US, and not the reverse. As far as superpowers go, I'll still take them over China, or India, or whoever else is going to take over in a few years.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
Welcome to the world of No Child Left Behind. Since there is no geography or civics measured for NCLB the focus has completely left that area as well as in the arts, PE, and vocational education. This is reflected by the regular decline in test scores in these areas.
What, because before No Child Left Behind American kids were geography wizzes? Get real. American children have been idiots for decades, especially when it comes to geography. You might be able to blame No Child Left Behind for a lot of ills, but this is certainly not one of them.

*Disclaimer: I was once a Washington State finalist in the National Geography Bee.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ami in berlin View Post
What, because before No Child Left Behind American kids were geography wizzes? Get real. American children have been idiots for decades, especially when it comes to geography. You might be able to blame No Child Left Behind for a lot of ills, but this is certainly not one of them.

*Disclaimer: I was once a Washington State finalist in the National Geography Bee.
The statistics show that geographic knowledge among students in the US is declining at the same time that geography has been taken out of the main stream of high stakes testing. That leads me to believe that is a cause and effect relationship. I never said anything about students being geniuses, I said that the test scores were declining.

American children are not idiots. They learn what they're taught and held accountable for. They're not taught georgraphy in part because the NCLB doesn't test for it and hold them accountable.
post #16 of 23
If you look at SkierScott's stats from National Geographic, the kids seem to be getting better at Geography not worse.
post #17 of 23
When was geography ever in the mainstream of American education? Certainly not when I was a student. I never had a single geography course. Occasionally it would creep in on the history and current affairs being taught once a week or so in ‘Social Studies’, but that was pretty rare.

As for American students learning what they have been taught held accountable for, since when? It’s not as if they’re tearing up the international league tables in math, science and reading, is it? Or are those also not in the curriculum?

There is nothing new in American students underperforming in comparison to their international peers on tests of knowledge in a variety of subjects, including geography. This is a situation that pre-dates No Child Left Behind.

In fact, if you look at the principles of No Child Left Behind as well as the factor for which it is most commonly criticised, namely over-reliance on standardised testing and subsequent ‘teaching to the test’, these very same factors are present to a far greater degree in those countries that whose routinely outperform American students. If American teachers think that No Child Left Behind involves too much testing, they ought to try teaching in pretty much any other developed country.

There are myriad contributing factors to the underperformance of American students in relation to students from around the world in a range of subjects and using a variety of testing measures. I dare say that No Child Left Behind is not one of those factors, however.

Please, criticise No Child Left Behind for the ills it causes, but not for those it does not.
post #18 of 23
Ami,

There is plenty to criticise NCLB for. In my state, the tested subjects are math, literacy, and science. While math scores are rising the slowest, all scores are rising over time. Holding kids accountable is working. There is nothing intrinsically stupid about American children. The fact is that they are not being taught or held accountable for geographic knowledge and it shows.

Accountability comes in different forms, governmental, social, and parental. The schools are bearing down, (believe me, I work in them and the effort, time, and resources aimed at improvement is mind boggling) but the rest are lagging behind. We in the education community will be beaten over the head by the government if we don't perform on the tested subjects, so they get the lion's share of the attention and effort. Everything outside of the tested areas is being ignored.

P

P.S. I take exception to your characterization of US kids as being "idiots." They can achieve the same as everyone else. It's our priorities, educationally and socially, that are idiotic.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post
I'm not American, but this sounds like BS to me. I think some people have gone so over the top with their anti-Americanism, that they want to... and will believe everything negative they hear about the States. Its definitely not perfect, and I'll still take my native Canada anyday, but people have to stop and realize that there is a reason why thousands and thousands of South Africans, Iraqis and Asians are leaving their homelands for the US, and not the reverse. As far as superpowers go, I'll still take them over China, or India, or whoever else is going to take over in a few years.
I hope you weren't insinuating that this american is anti-american.

I do, however, have some pretty big issues with the salaries of teachers and the cost of university. It doesn't fit. I have 4 friends and family members that are teachers that give me the information I have in regards to teacher salary. I'm not aiming to believe, because I want to, everything negative I hear about America. On the contrary, I miss it severely.

I teach highschool in Japan. My salary is 4 times that of my friend who teaches 3rd grade in Montana and twice that of my cousin who teaches highschool in Northern California and about 25 percent higher than my cousin who teaches in Minnesota. It's not glorifying over here, but I manage to put into savings what my friend back in montana takes home. In Japan, people actually want to be teachers for the salary, the benefits and the retirement packages. It's one of the most secure retirement packages in the whole country. My retirement package, for a non-japanese teacher, costs more per month than my friend in Montana earns.

And to compare immigration rates from South Africa, Iraq and Asia is quite the leap. Could you please choose something developed, and not war-torn? I know hundreds of teachers who have chosen to teach in Japan over the U.S. And they all have a minimum of a Bachelor's and most of us are obtaining Master's degrees so when we go home we won't have to compete against the unqualified teachers for 7 bucks an hour that are currently being recruited. "You don't even need a degree."

I love my homeland and do plan on returning in the near future, and would never choose Japan first. However, my kids will receive international educations and I won't teach in the US if I can't afford clothes for them.

(With all my gryping, my kids won't receive strictly-Japanese educations either. There is plenty wrong over here too... although my students do all recognize the US when I draw it on the board.)

No Child Left Behind... How about, No Teacher Under Paid.

both Japanese and American school systems could learn a lot from one another. the Japanese could learn it's okay to bomb your test, as long as you pass it next time. there is no next time in Japan. Students are given very few exams per year and make-ups aren't allowed. Teachers are paid on seniority, not merit. that is lame as many senior teachers could give a rats-ass less. but... they are paid and competition for teaching jobs is high. (unless you're a foreigner, then all you have to do is sign up... I mean come on, they hired me, didn't they?
post #20 of 23
Usa ... north side of Kyushu.
post #21 of 23
Well, I took that National Geographic test; got 19 of 20 (not bragging; and despite their disclaimer I don't think a question on where the original CSI program was located reflects anyone's geographic knowledge).
What shocked me was one of the last questions:
On what continent is Sri Lanka located? :
Maybe I'm nitpicking, but I'd say the folks at NatGeo need to study some maps.
post #22 of 23


If that makes you feel better ...
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post


If that makes you feel better ...
so are they still teaching a Geocentric universe in french schools? I hear Plato is all the rage there, he still hasnt went out of style in france.
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