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Purple Cows and the Snow Sports Industry

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Steve just pointed me to the following discussion of Purple Cows.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
For a bit on the concept of Purple Cows, check out Seth Godin's book of that name or take a look at this video.
The video is a little over 17 minutes and well worth the look. I've always been a nut on this sort of stuff and it got me thinking about how to apply it to skiing. So I decided to throw it out for general discussion.

We all bitch and moan about that we don't have, get, or keep new skiers/riders. So, here's the challenge. How do we make Purple Cows for the snow sports industry?

I'm looking for some real discussion about this. It affects what we all do and love to do.
post #2 of 37

Moooooooooooo

One aspect of this is the celebrity angle. After every Olympics, we get a flood of new first timers. Clone the flying Tomato and his American Express commercials. The Sonny Bono news stories hurt the sport though by promulgating the myth that you'll die or suffer serious injury learning to ski or ride.

Another aspect of this is that the heart of the NSAA model for growth strategy is "going for the middle". But it's going for the middle of a different demographic than what we currently have and a few of the things that NSAA wants to do amounts to Purple Cows for the targeted demographics.

The most effective aspect I've been involved with is deep discounting of learn to ski/ride packages for groups with big incentives to the group leaders. I did not pick up the "terms" from the speech, but for me this has been the most effective means of bringing new people to the sport. The Purple Cow aspect to this is a price tag that is a fraction of the expected cost.
post #3 of 37
The real lesson of Godin's insights is that you can't "go for the middle"! The only way to reach the middle is through the early adopters. The people to whom the middle go for advice.

And have a product or service that is unique in what it is.

So, instead of trying to be "no worse than golf", perhaps we need to think about things a bit differently...
post #4 of 37
Purple cows are already well known to the ski industry!
http://www.kraftfoods.at/kraft/image...ilka%20cow.jpg
post #5 of 37
Nicely done, Martin!

Unfortunately, that's one of the few that I've seen.

Some others...
  • The single chair at MRG
  • The tram at Snowbird
  • The tram at Jackson
  • The Palisades
  • The back bowls
  • Lone Peak
  • Highlands Bowl
  • Grooming at Deer Valley
  • Instruction at Taos
  • The ESA
These are all unique for one reason or another. The early adopters and hard core know about them. Someone asks for your favorite places, what would you tell them? Chances are, it's a Purple Cow.

Too many in skiing are trying to make it all the same. It won't work. There needs to be a clear reason for one place over another. Stop trying to find success through copying others. It doesn't work with people and it doesn't work in business!

Capitalize on what's different and find a way to get and keep people talking. Advertising is dead! Word of mouth is the answer, and being a Purple Cow is why people will talk about you...

...for good or ill, btw!
post #6 of 37
From the well financed the number one reason I hear that they do not ski any longer is fear of getting hurt and not being able to work or worse.

From the less financially backed, its too expensive. Gear, hotels, gas, rentals, food, its a several hundred dollar day for a family of four....very difficult for most people.

Since the majority of folks in the world are not wealthy, then to attract and keep people would simply be to make it more accessible to everyone. Package deals that include everything should be pushed not just for a whole weekend but for even a one day adventure to a semi-local mountain.

For those that have never tried it and dont want to, fear, cost, and distance is what I hear as reasons. "Drive 3hrs, to freeze my butt off, spend $200, and possibly break my leg, and then not be able to work, no thanks." Dont forget many people do not have health insurance, so a broken leg can mean financial ruin.

Now with reduced snow in big metro areas, like NYC, people think that just becasue there is no snow in Manhatten then the mountains are also bare.

Universally, for a first timer going out on the mountain with your denim jeans, cotton long-johns, and North Face down filled jacket, its a recipe for disaster. Too hot and sweaty on top, wet and cold on the bottom, its enough to deter anyone. The solution, spend a few hundred dollars on ski clothes that if you are a beginner and dont take to this activity may never be put to use again...not realistic.

It all comes down to money, either directly from what you spend to ski, or by lost wages from injuries.

Most sports do not require such a huge investment nor put the athlete at such potential risks.

Nothing I have said here is not common knowledge, but sometimes I think we have to remember that as ski enthusiasts we really have plenty invested in this activity and that the majority of folk cannot or do not want to do the same.

I'll get off my soap box now.......
post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Advertising is dead! Word of mouth is the answer, and being a Purple Cow is why people will talk about you...
That reminds me of the time when someone from our magazine (Daily Mail Ski) went to Zermatt to try to sell advertising. The Director of the Tourist Office simply said, "Why should we advertise? We have the Matterhorn!"
post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
The real lesson of Godin's insights is that you can't "go for the middle"! The only way to reach the middle is through the early adopters. The people to whom the middle go for advice.
Well, the way I heard it, his point was that the traditional marketing methods (e.g. TV ads) that used to work quite well for going for the middle are not nearly as effective any more. So it's not that you can't do this, it's just that the cost/benefit has changed such that this technique is not cost-effective more most (all?) businesses compared to other more modern marketing alternatives (e.g. the early adopter).

Around my neck of the woods, ski resorts generally do not use TV ads. They do use radio a lot. As I understand it, radio ads are very cost effective for the ski industry in this area. Also, if you look at the numbers, group sales is a big driver for ski resort business in my neck of the woods. Although daily numbers for group sales may only average 20% of the visitors, it's my observation that group sales volume tends to be more heavily skewed to the beginner population. If you look at the dynamics of group sales, this is typically a good example of early adopters reaching into the middle.

Part of what the NSAA model for growth is attempting to do is getting resorts to be more prepared to serving the needs of new demographic groups as well as changing the image of the sport in the marketplace from a "rich white male high risk" sport to a "fun anyone can do this" sport. Along with this, new activities such as tubing become an effective purple cow, especially with climate warming reducing the opportunity to tube and sled for free locally.

The concept of "early adopter" in the sport of skiing needs some stretching of the definition since the sport has been around for a long time. We have parents introducing their kids to the sport and we have experienced skiers introducing the sport to others via social groups (e.g. kids cliques, church and school associations, etc.). These adopters are "early" relative to the people they introduce to the sport, but they aren't necessarily early the way Godin talks about. It's hard to think of Godin's early adopter for a product that has existed for several generations.

So that leads us into what individual resorts can do to make their resort a purple cow to stand out amongst other resorts. We've all seen a ton of this stuff. New trails, new lifts, new lodges - every year there's something new somewhere. Special programs like women's days, veterans and police/firefighter days, college nights, radio station broadcasts on location are common. Package deals, flexible ticket pricing, season pass deals, discount cards are at every resort in some shape or form. Special events like races, other competitions, spring carnivals, New Year's eve parties abound. Anyone seen mascots on the hill? Focus on services from grooming to snowmaking to ski school to greeters at the entrance, friendly lifties, etc, have been tried at many resorts. A terrain park is a classic purple cow. But as Godin notes, when everyone does it, it's not a purple cow anymore. Maybe skiing is mature enough that we can take advanatge of the saying "everything old gets new again". Oops - wait - I think a couple of resorts already have "retro" days.

A local resort in my area introduced a real purple cow: the aero (inflatable) sleds (sic - I think that's what they're called). They allow them on the regular trails. I can't tell you how many regular skiers I talked to whose first thought about these sleds on the slopes was "Oh my God, that's just perfect for taking skiers out at the knees. I don't want to ski there." How about that statue of the elephant in the plaza (Mammoth). Speaking of Mammoth, not every resort has a killer fumarole in the middle of their slope! You know, sometimes a purple cow is exactly that. It's different, but I don't really care or want one.

One could argue that ski resorts have been in the purple cow business for generations.
post #9 of 37
The idea of the purple cow seems to be to present something to the avid, rabid comsumer that excites them to the point that they can not stop themselves from spreading the word. I don't think most of the items in ssh's list qualify. They are unique and exceptional but they have existed for so long that the big buzz has died off. Remember Coke Japan brings out a new product every three weeks - the tram at Jackson was there so long its being replaced.

The marketing of the ski industry seems to bank on many classic or long standing ideas, images and events. How many years in a row can someone return to work after their ski vacation and tell the story of the tourch light parade or playing volley ball on snow at the spring carnival or pond skimming or horse drawn sleigh rides or the tram ride you where packed into like a sardine or... After awhile these thing become unremarkable to the zealot, and I can imagine the average skier drifting into a coma upon hearing the story of the perfect grooming for the umpteenth time.

The purple cow is at least a twist of the conventional and more likely a truely unique thing.

My observation is that my local ski areas try to improve their bottom line mostly in two ways. 1) Reduce expenses and 2) increase amount spent per skier per visit. These tactics are often upsetting to the avid skier and will not create good word of mouth from the regulars. Furthermore, focus on these methods seems to limit the effort to give more people more reasons to ski more often (read as spend more money).

Everyone talks about creating and retaining new skiers, but rarely do I see complete commitment to any plan. And even more rare are purple cows. I suppose that in a risky sport, where risk management dominates so many decisions, risky marketing ideas don't stand much of a chance.

Skiing has its otaku - people drive into stroms, literally risking their life, for a chance to ski fresh snow. The ski industry needs to grow a set, take some chances and create events and products that excite the otaku to the point they can't help but spread the word.

Some quick ideas:
-Track total individual spending and give rewards at certain points
-New paint for the tram/groomers per design contest with an unvailing party
-Snow sculpting contest and show and party
-Discount/season pass holder bring a friend day
-Hold typical end of season events during the early season
-After a low snow year have a early season event to appease Ullr - bring and trash old, unworthy gear. Create a mountain of trashed skis, poles and boots for all to see.

Maybe some areas are doing these things. Maybe one will be a hit and become a tradition at your area. Maybe they are just bad ideas
but remember the reason Coke of Japan brings out a new product every three weeks -- Because they have no idea whats going to work and whats not.

Keep doing what works, stop doing what doesn't and always try something new.
post #10 of 37
therusty, I doubt that radio advertising actually does work, even around there. It's almost impossible to measure, but indications are that advertising is tuned out by virtually everyone. It takes exceptional marketing to break through the information noise.

That said, I don't think most of the things that you mention are actually Purple Cows. They are features. They are attempts to draw people in by appealing to something that they know. It's OK, but it's no Purple Cow.

The Matterhorn! Now there's a Purple Cow! And that was one smart Tourist Director!

Think about why you go to a particular resort or area. What draws you to it? Now, find ways of communicating that to gatekeepers and trend-setters (in the literal, not media-hyped sense), and you've got something.

Yesterday on Flyer Talk I read about a UA captain who greets all customers at the door, handing them collectors cards about the plane they are flying. He signs the backs of them. He hands out his business cards with his personal mobile phone number and e-mail address to all F and elite fliers on the plane. If a diversion happens, he is known to find a restaurant and order 200 hamburgers.

Now that is a Purple Cow in the airline industry!

Purple Cows aren't easy to create. I don't think that anything in the SIAA plan is going to make any difference in participation or retention. They are targeting causes, not effects.
post #11 of 37
JRN, well said (we were posting at the same time)! I think that you're mostly right.

Some of those things in my list continue to pull people back. That's why I think of them as a Purple Cow, but, as Godin says, once there are a lot of Purple Cows, you don't see them any more, either. You need to create something new.

Ritz Carlton/Nordstrom service at a ski resort would be a Purple Cow. What about a keepsake award for being seen skiing (someone takes a picture, awards you for the skill you're displaying, and gives it to you in a holder that you're proud to display)? How about digital video--for free on the resort website?

I am not claiming to have the ideas to be implemented. Nonetheless, I feel for those who would love skiing who don't ever try it because we do such a terrible job helping them imagine what awaits them.
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
therusty, I doubt that radio advertising actually does work, even around there. It's almost impossible to measure, but indications are that advertising is tuned out by virtually everyone. It takes exceptional marketing to break through the information noise.
Well, it's time to bust those doubts. After 14 seasons at my resort and being able to talk with SAM (ski area management) on a regular basis and hearing the radio commercials on my "set" of stations - which typically run in blitzes at specific points in the season vs a steady stream throughout, I've been able to directly verify the results of advertising with my own eyes, especially when we went through seasons with no money to advertise at the end of the season as comparisons. Radio advertising may be low power advertising, but it has not lost it's punch in the web/IPOD age the way TV has according to Godin. It's been very interesting to hear SAM talk about "fine tuning" the radio advertising concerning timing, volume and style as well as matching snow making efforts to radio advertising at the end of the season. From my discussions, I'd guess that they expect each $20K in radio ads to generate $500K in revenue.

From my experiences working as a resort marketing rep at early season ski swaps and community festivals, I get the opportunity to talk with (i.e. sell) a lot of marginal skiers. It's amazing how many people living in this area who "ski" but don't understand that the amount of snow in their back yard has little relevance to the conditions at the resort. Throughout most of our season there is no snow on the ground at home. But these skiers do understand that when they hear the ads, that the resort is open. Radio ads may not have enough power to trigger a visit all on their own, but there's enough circumstantial evidence to believe that they at least act as a partial trigger.
post #13 of 37
If we had a Purple Cow, it would be invisible in the fog. Which, for the locals, is bliss. Here is reverse psychology at work: http://www.montana-sucks.com
post #14 of 37
So, more like a news blast, right? Let customers know that they can come out, as opposed to drawing in new customers. That's good, agreed, but, again, not really the issue for retention/attraction.

I still doubt that you're drawing out new skiers with those ads, but that's not really the point. The point is whether or not advertising is the answer to capturing the imagination of those who are not already captured.

I don't think so.

It may help your revenue in the short term, but there has to be something about the experience that truly captures customers. And isn't overcome by the various hassles that we so often hear about.
post #15 of 37
As an anecdotal datapoint, radio ads do work sometime. About 8 seasons ago, when I finally decided to get back into skiing, the radio ads Sunday River ran nearly every morning on Boston rock stations (WBOS to be specific) encouraged my choice and also made me decide to drive the extra distance to try them out. I liked what I saw, including the peak-to-peak skiing without the Killington craziness, and they became my regular area for the next 5 years till we moved to Colorado.

Did they have a Purple Cow? Maybe not, especially since ASC owned them. Though I think Lisamarie might suggest that their Perfect Turn program in its early years is what made learning to ski enjoyable. The dedicated "first-timer" building, orientation video, instructors helping with boot fit and rentals rather than "go to the rental shop and then meet your instructor at lineup" was a big improvement. Sunday River did the whole Perfect Turn "experience" much better than its sister resorts Mt. Snow and Killington did - perhaps because the Rivah was ASC HQ at the time.

Portillo, from where I'm writing this in the Living Room of the grand Hotel Portillo, is itself one big Purple Cow IMHO. The skiing is great, yes, but it's really not that huge an area compared to some, and with no new snow in 3 weeks now it's rather crunchy out there. Yet the experience has been a total blast: the cruise ship-like atmosphere (Felipe the Social Director - shades of Julie on the Love Boat), the same dining seatings every night with waiters who get to know you and your tastes (Hola Senora Lisamaria, cafe y fruita hoy?), the 4 meals a day, the free games, films, ballet, disco, bar bands, board games, getting to know the other guests. Rather unique in the skiing industry, at least from what I've seen. I'd absolutely love to come back again. Even as a paying guest, if Lisa can't swing another guest presenter deal. North of $4000 USD for a couple at regular rates - yet it feels totally worth it.

How do our "regular" areas that are not isolated, all-inclusive resorts create something unique? I don't know, but improving the guest experience significantly, getting people out of long rental and lesson signup lines, encouraging learning as a means to enjoy and be thrilled more (rather than "rent some equipment and 'do' a hard trail out of control), and the overpriced crummy food that's nearly universal on-mountain - these are all areas that need to be better if we want to attract and keep people.

Perhaps areas with unique terrain can push that. Maybe even in packages - as much as I'd worry about overpromising, a "Beginner to Bowls" ski camp week with intensive daily lessons combined with guiding could be a salable package for a resort that has blue-black or ego-black bowls. A place that actually has good food and unique dining options on mountain and at the base (and I'm not talking Enzo's or Jack's nor Border Burritos or Ten Mile Station's buffalo chili here) could promote the excellent and healthy and affordable dining options.

Heck, a "Welcome to Skiing & Riding" section of the main base lodge that just had repeating-loop videos about how to navigate the experience would help make the entry to skiing easier. We all know this, but the average non-skiing, reasonably affluent non-skiing family doesn't have a clue about:
  • Lift tickets are not the same as Lesson tickets
  • Lift tickets don't go on your jacket zipper.
  • There is a Responsibility Code (printing it on napkins doesn't help much)
  • Don't tuck your (non-stretch) ski pants inside your boots.
  • Wear one pair of socks.
  • Yes, there are bathrooms on the mountain (my daughter was worried about this the first time we took her skiing when she was a mid-teen)
  • Here's the map of the resort.
  • Please don't "reserve a table for the family" in the lodge/cafeteria all day long (you hear that all you Stowe Soccer Moms?)
  • Lessons are fun because you can ski more interesting trails sooner and safer.
Think of those videos you see on the plane prior to arrival on an international flight when coming into Dulles or Munich or similar. There's a quick orientation to what forms you need, where you go when you de-plane, how to clear immigration, etc. I still find that helpful when arriving at an unfamiliar airport, even though I'm a reasonably experienced traveler. Imaging that suburban family wanting to try skiing, attempting to figure out all the places they need to go and what they need to buy, when they arrive for the first time at the typical resort.

Or maybe Americans mostly just don't want to do anything participatory anymore. The theme park "experience" replaces the true experience. In which case let's enjoy the ski areas while they still can afford to stay open. :
post #16 of 37
All they need is a new good (key word) ski movie to glamorize skiing once again and youll have people flocking....which to use may not be such a good thing (longer lines).
post #17 of 37
MarkXS, it sounds to me like Sunday River had a Purple Cow for you ("peak-to-peak skiing without the Killington craziness") and for Lisa (the implementation of the Perfect Turn program).

It also sounds like Portillo has one, too (perhaps they'd like another guest lecturer next year! ).

It's not going to be the same for every resort. Each one needs to think about how to really underline the unique aspects of their experience... and ideally expand them. Constantly.

It's not a simple one-shot "oh, here's our Purple Cow" deal. It's constantly having your business, product, and/or service rise to the top.
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
  • The single chair at MRG
  • The tram at Snowbird
  • The tram at Jackson
  • The Palisades
  • The back bowls
  • Lone Peak
  • Highlands Bowl
  • Grooming at Deer Valley
  • Instruction at Taos
  • The ESA
These are all unique for one reason or another. The early adopters and hard core know about them. Someone asks for your favorite places, what would you tell them? Chances are, it's a Purple Cow.
THose things will attract skiers to different mountains, but they won't create new skiers. The last thing that really created new skiers was the invention of the chair lift.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRN View Post
My observation is that my local ski areas try to improve their bottom line mostly in two ways. 1) Reduce expenses and 2) increase amount spent per skier per visit. These tactics are often upsetting to the avid skier and will not create good word of mouth from the regulars. Furthermore, focus on these methods seems to limit the effort to give more people more reasons to ski more often (read as spend more money).
Cutting costs is the classic way to survive in a mature industry, which is what the ski business is. Trying to extract more money from customers is a loser's game for ski areas, because they will find themselves competing against low cost alternatives AND high cost alternatives. How many families would choose a week of skiing at Stowe over a week in Aruba if the price were the same? (Oh, wait. It is the same. That's why Stowe is a ghost town midweek.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Ritz Carlton/Nordstrom service at a ski resort would be a Purple Cow...
That's the worst thing that has happened to skiing. We've changed it from a sport that requires commitment and that has unavoidable risks, and changed it to Disneyland on snow.
Skiing is a sport, not a business. It doesn't need to grow for us to enjoy it and all the benefits it brings. Real estate is a business, and it has hurt the sport of skiing by diluting the experience of the mountains, which is what skiing is really about. The mountain experience at its best is about survival in a difficult and sometimes harsh environment, and it is definitely not for everyone.

BK
post #19 of 37
Bode, most sports are businesses. It is what allows them to survive. If they were not businesses, we'd need to make our own equipment, hike for every turn, and cut our own trails. Not terrible, but I'd get much less skiing in each season.

BTW, I wasn't suggesting that the Ritz/Nordstrom model is the only one. Just see MarkXS's perspective on Portillo, though. It does draw one to a new place, does it not? It may even draw one to skiing there instead of visiting Aruba. Or Fiji.

The concept of the ski business as a mature industry is one perspective. I tend not to hold that particular paradigm of business, so don't think about it that way. Rather that there are many who would enjoy skiing who are not seeing what they are missing and would enjoy. That's my personal focus. :
post #20 of 37
I think that there are two main issues which block people from becoming skiers (or even attempting it) who actually have the money to do it: 1) couch potato society. They'll go watch NASTAR, TV football, buy X-boxes, etc., but when it comes to actually getting off their butt and doing something they would rather not sweat. 2) Timidity about looking like a newbie. I think newcomers need handholding even from the point of knowing what to pack for a day trip. If they don't have a skiing friend to introduce them, I think they're at sea before the thought even finishes being formed. I'm not sure how to get around this other than by skiers actively helping newbies and most of us are too self-centered about our snow to share it with them. I'm trying to think of another sport that requires as much planning and not coming up with much...scuba diving maybe? (nah, you can rent all of that, get a lesson and just show up in your swim trunks....)
post #21 of 37
Don't you think that we could actually do something about #2 if we focused on it?
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post
We all bitch and moan about that we don't have, get, or keep new skiers/riders. So, here's the challenge. How do we make Purple Cows for the snow sports industry?
Considering T Squares original question, I don't think most of these ideas would be a purple cow for a beginner. Thinking back, possiblely snowboarding was the last purple cow in our snow sport. Pipe and park skiing might also be one - look at the X Games.

Of course these cows have mostly drawn the young to the sport, while the older people seem to fall into the demographic sibhusky mentioned.

Maybe the big pay off of these inovations lies in the future. If todays boarder and jibbers can be retained the true growth may come when they start having families and bring 1, 2 or 3 people with them.

Wish I had a good ideal for a retention purple cow.
post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Don't you think that we could actually do something about #2 if we focused on it?
Hmmm...more "product placement" in TV and movies? More opportunity to view things set in a ski area. (It always seems like those outdoorsy series don't last too long, though.) Whereas your teen boy wants to break his neck trying new things, once he's a dad, he's busy at work, and mom wants help around the house. Think, though, how much interest there is suddenly in forensics since the CSI series. If only there was some way to depict skiing as interesting week after week without making it look like a good way to get hurt and the actors weren't the normal horrid skiers you normally find in movies.... Maybe a "Dallas" type thing to draw them in, but set in a ski area and somehow getting people comfortable with the atmosphere, the joy of being on the mountain, the family fun atmosphere of the lodge..... Sounds a bit heartwarming, though....
post #24 of 37
Hey, sibhusky, ever considered trying your hand at a screenplay?
post #25 of 37
God, no, it'd interfere with my vertical.
post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
God, no, it'd interfere with my vertical.




Well, if you get bored next summer... :
post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Hmmm...more "product placement" in TV and movies? More opportunity to view things set in a ski area.
So: Rich teens at a ski area, doing whatever rich teens did on the OC or Laguna Beach or whatever other TV show. That would have to sell, and people must be getting tired of rich teens at the beach by now, no?

I think the TV/Movie product placement idea is brilliant. As Steve points out, ads are mostly just noise unless they are exceptional. Product, nay, lifestyle placement in the dominant form of entertainment? Priceless. I agree with Bode that skiing should be a sport and doesn't need (suffers from, in fact) the silly real estate thing. Yet as an adherent I feel the need to spread the good word. Skiing is great and many more people should enjoy it. I've enjoyed this thread and the movie and I think its a good topic to ponder.
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman View Post
So: Rich teens at a ski area, doing whatever rich teens did on the OC or Laguna Beach or whatever other TV show. That would have to sell, and people must be getting tired of rich teens at the beach by now, no?

I think the TV/Movie product placement idea is brilliant. As Steve points out, ads are mostly just noise unless they are exceptional. Product, nay, lifestyle placement in the dominant form of entertainment? Priceless. I agree with Bode that skiing should be a sport and doesn't need (suffers from, in fact) the silly real estate thing. Yet as an adherent I feel the need to spread the good word. Skiing is great and many more people should enjoy it. I've enjoyed this thread and the movie and I think its a good topic to ponder.
THAT might mean the return of stretch pants!!!!! After all, what are we going to do to show buns at a ski area beyond some hot tubs? There's always bikinis on those 90210 shows, we'd have to think of the equivalent way to show sexy bodies skiing.

I HATED STRETCH PANTS. They're cold.
post #29 of 37
Thread Starter 
Yeh, but as a guy I loved those stretch pants. Especially the one's where you could tell if the quarter in her pocket had the heads or tails side facing out. : Hey, I was a teenager with all those unused hormones running rampant.


More on point here. What sort of purple cow would draw or attract people? I've seen some stuff where non-skiers can be taken for chauffeured rides on the mountain. I think this is the sort of purple cow that can really be a sign of distinction at a resort. Bring Granny, we can get her out with you.
post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post
Yeh, but as a guy I loved those stretch pants. Especially the one's where you could tell if the quarter in her pocket had the heads or tails side facing out. : Hey, I was a teenager with all those unused hormones running rampant.


More on point here. What sort of purple cow would draw or attract people? I've seen some stuff where non-skiers can be taken for chauffeured rides on the mountain. I think this is the sort of purple cow that can really be a sign of distinction at a resort. Bring Granny, we can get her out with you.
That just makes things even more expensive than they already are. You want the masses to go, thats where the big money is, not catering just to the wealthy. The rich will have all that and then some if so desired at any time.
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