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Best East Coast Tree ski? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
OK Tromano, Bush, I surrender. Fat skis are far better in the woods, on groomed, even in the parking lot, and it snows all the time in New England and it's amazing any of us ever survived back here without them.

But as far as "walls of shame", T, guess I failed to realize that asking about a tree ski meant that when we ski trees, someone apparently carries us on their back to the top of the line, we exit right by the lift, and we never ever ski anything the entire day except trees. Which are really widely spaced, child's play to ski, and never have bumps or obstacles that can't be smeared. Anyway, New England doesn't get many bumps. It snows way too much. Or maybe that doesn't matter because of course fats also have edges and handle beautifully on ice and bumps, too. In sum, I'm just so embarrassed to even live here, let alone sugest on Epic that skiing something under 85 mm might be OK. Next time I'll dutifully answer EXACTLY what's asked, like all the other Bears always do, and I'l cleanse my mind of these ignorant beliefs about carvers. Thank you so much for getting me straight!
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
OK Tromano, Bush, I surrender. Fat skis are far better in the woods, on groomed, even in the parking lot, and it snows all the time in New England and it's amazing any of us ever survived back here without them.

But as far as "walls of shame", T, guess I failed to realize that asking about a tree ski meant that when we ski trees, someone apparently carries us on their back to the top of the line, we exit right by the lift, and we never ever ski anything the entire day except trees. Which are really widely spaced, child's play to ski, and never have bumps or obstacles that can't be smeared. Anyway, New England doesn't get many bumps. It snows way too much. Or maybe that doesn't matter because of course fats also have edges and handle beautifully on ice and bumps, too. In sum, I'm just so embarrassed to even live here, let alone sugest on Epic that skiing something under 85 mm might be OK. Next time I'll dutifully answer EXACTLY what's asked, like all the other Bears always do, and I'l cleanse my mind of these ignorant beliefs about carvers. Thank you so much for getting me straight!
STOP GIVING OUT TREE SKI ADVICE. PLEASE.
post #33 of 43
For anyone else:

I'm 6'1, 180 lb and ski mainly two skis in the woods:

179 K2 Public Enemy (2006 model)
190 Atomic Big Daddy (2007 model)

The Public Enemy is an excellent all around ski too, on BUMPS and ICE. But it floats very well in pow for a narrower ski (85mm waist) due to the shape of the tip..
post #34 of 43
Last three years I've been using Elan 662s 168s (116,76,102) as my wood ski (Jay, MRG). Have used my S12s on occasion and my 777s, but the 662 work best for me.

While I don't carve in the woods I have seen several people (including a Jay instructor) do a fairly good imitation of it in woods (in knee deep powder).
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
STOP GIVING OUT TREE SKI ADVICE. PLEASE.
You are reading into that post.
post #36 of 43
My guess is that a lot of you understood "Eastern Tree Ski" to mean, I don't know, East of the Sierras but West of Nebraska. Jay has more snow than any other ski area in the East, but it's still Vermont (and, anyway, the question was about treeskiing "like at Jay", not just at Jay). I've logged a lot of days in Vermont trees. Nice to have a little float on those days when there's a bit of fresh, for sure. But you better have a ski that holds on ice, because there's a lot of that in the Vermont woods too. Along with rocks and, often, bumps. I love skiing in Vermont, but it's very different than skiing in the trees at Steamboat or Crested Butte or Kirkwood.
post #37 of 43
Oh, OK, I take it all back. The ultimate tree ski is a 165 Head SuperShape. Get that. :
post #38 of 43
Nothing holds on ice like a true RACE STOCK ski. You should use a nice versatile RACE STOCK ski, one with a round smooth flex like the Volkl RACE STOCK Racetiger SL...don't forget some PLUG BOOTS.
post #39 of 43
Don't forget shin guards for shinning saplings.
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Oh, OK, I take it all back. The ultimate tree ski is a 165 Head SuperShape. Get that. :
And head to Stratton.
post #41 of 43
The correct answer to this question is...


A Burton Fish. The Ultimate EC Tree weapon.
post #42 of 43

Excellent post...

30 days on the Contact 11's last year in the east. Ice, man made, slush, straw/mud and 5 days (my first in ten years of skiing) in two feet of fresh. I've dropped 30 lbs and cant wait for the subsequent improvement in performance. I'll be looking at a wider ski for deeper conditions just so I can have it if and when I'm in it but the Contact 11 has been very good to me...even on my first tree/powder run ever...Killington's Anarchy in two feet of fresh....nothing like timing.
post #43 of 43

...the secret to EC trees...

Whiteroom..!...
YES....the Racetiger..YES, the tigerpaws on the bark...and with the elbow pads. ..Although this may be more accurately mistaken as the setup for weekends on EC groomers....;-)
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