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Rollerblading newbee - what to expect - Page 3

post #61 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
It is quite possible to learn carving on inline skates. If you were here, I could teach you how. The "bending the skis at hookup" element is replaced by "deform the wheels at hookup". You are not creating enough outside skate pressure. You need to be more 'stacked' above the skate. You need to have countering movements and angulation as well, all with a vertical torso.

It is so easy to carve on inlines. What is missing from it is the offset edges -- inline edges are under foot, ski edges are to each side.
BigE is correct. Outside skate pressure/dominance is critical. IMO, carving/arcing on inlines is easy to do incorrectly- meaning with Rotation and converging legs (A Frame) from insufficient tipping of the inside skate/foot/leg.

IMO, pumping/entending the outside leg late in the arc is your movement to energize the skate. As per BigE's suggestion- early counter movements to balance and create pressure on the outside skate will go a long way to help with your inline and your skiing.

Harb carvers are without question (IMO) the best ski crossover training tool I have found. I have inlined since the mid nineties with skiing movements as a main focus. This spring I got the carvers and WOW! They are like a truth serum. I love going distance on my five wheels but the carvers are the training tool for skiing simulation.

I like the way you flex the outside leg to release the arc. Continue the tipping movements of that old outside skate into the next arc.

I hope you want MA. If not, sorry. Bolter
post #62 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Dare I say "Harb Carvers"?
...
Of course say it. Check out the website and some of the videos of carvers in action. They are a good alternative when there ain't no snow....
post #63 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post
Of course say it. Check out the website and some of the videos of carvers in action. They are a good alternative when there ain't no snow....
may i have the link to the video?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolter View Post
BigE is correct. Outside skate pressure/dominance is critical. IMO, carving/arcing on inlines is easy to do incorrectly- meaning with Rotation and converging legs (A Frame) from insufficient tipping of the inside skate/foot/leg.
IMO, pumping/entending the outside leg late in the arc is your movement to energize the skate. As per BigE's suggestion- early counter movements to balance and create pressure on the outside skate will go a long way to help with your inline and your skiing.
i guess BigE might hit the main point. rotation definately can ruin the carve. I have the same problem in skiing as commented by BigE. If you want to have comment on my skiing too. i can send you a link in pm.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolter View Post
...
Harb carvers are without question (IMO) the best ski crossover training tool I have found. I have inlined since the mid nineties with skiing movements as a main focus. This spring I got the carvers and WOW! They are like a truth serum. I love going distance on my five wheels but the carvers are the training tool for skiing simulation.
what difference would you say when comparing inline with Harb carvers in terms of skiing movement?
post #64 of 75
the trouble with the Harb Carvers is that you really can't skate back up the hill with them. they're strictly downhill ... you need to have someone tow or drive you back up to the top of the hill. whereas, the benefit of in line skates is you get the downhill turning in as well as the uphill cardio workout ... and then you get to do it all again ...!!!

Not to mention the fact that you have to wear alpine ski boots with the Harb Carvers making any attempt at going back uphill under your own power absolutely out of the questions.

But , despite those drawbacks. They certainly do provide an ski - like experience . Personally, IMO, the in-line skates provide a better conditioning tool and a reasonably good alpine ski trainer.

Everything's a compromise.
post #65 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by madriverskier View Post
the trouble with the Harb Carvers is that you really can't skate back up the hill with them. they're strictly downhill ... you need to have someone tow or drive you back up to the top of the hill. whereas, the benefit of in line skates is you get the downhill turning in as well as the uphill cardio workout ... and then you get to do it all again ...!!!

Not to mention the fact that you have to wear alpine ski boots with the Harb Carvers making any attempt at going back uphill under your own power absolutely out of the questions.

But , despite those drawbacks. They certainly do provide an ski - like experience . Personally, IMO, the in-line skates provide a better conditioning tool and a reasonably good alpine ski trainer.

Everything's a compromise.
Yeah..but I still want to try them. :. I cannot image what being in a skiboot in for a couple pf hours in the summer must be like though...and what the boot will smell like afterwards. ooof.
post #66 of 75
Can't skate uphill? C'mon, suck it up! It'll put hair on your chest.
post #67 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by madriverskier View Post
the trouble with the Harb Carvers is that you really can't skate back up the hill with them. they're strictly downhill ... you need to have someone tow or drive you back up to the top of the hill. whereas, the benefit of in line skates is you get the downhill turning in as well as the uphill cardio workout ... and then you get to do it all again ...!!!

Not to mention the fact that you have to wear alpine ski boots with the Harb Carvers making any attempt at going back uphill under your own power absolutely out of the questions.

But , despite those drawbacks. They certainly do provide an ski - like experience . Personally, IMO, the in-line skates provide a better conditioning tool and a reasonably good alpine ski trainer.

Everything's a compromise.
No, in this case you do not need to compromise. Uphill and downhill on carvers is just fine, poles with tip protectors assist in the climb, The boot and carver weigh more than racing five wheels but the carvers roll super fast and uphill is no problem. Carvers are also a great conditioning tool with a clear advantage in ski training. IMO.
post #68 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post

what difference would you say when comparing inline with Harb carvers in terms of skiing movement?
At first, the carvers don't want to turn, and you can use all the knee drive and Rotation you got and they do not respond well. Sure, after a time you can force them around with inefficient movements but this will not unlock the carvers potential.
In a word the key element is tipping the inside foot/boot to turn. Add counter and counterbalance (upright torso) and they will rip SL turns for you, exactly like skis. Really, they demand better technique than skis do, which says much about the ski training benifits.

carverhk, judging by your video you would love the carvers. IMO
post #69 of 75
heres what i found harb carvers in action:
http://www.harbskisystems.com/carver/action.htm

looks quite interesting apart from you need a good weather to practice comfortably.
post #70 of 75

I developed a passion for skiing this past winter and want to move things along in the off season, so amongst other activities I'm endeavoring to teach myself to rollerblade. Never skated as a kid, so it's been slow going, but I've graduated from holding on to counters in my kitchen to office complex parking lots with lots of running space and some degree of slope. Trying to get out for at least 30 minutes several evenings a week, and am getting better at controlling line with carved turns, but still need a fair amount of room if I pick up any significant speed.

 

I picked up a "Skate To Ski" tape off Amazon, and it has some good content, but I'm going to focus on getting stronger with rollerblading basics before I try to mix in ski poles. I've been looking online for videos that demonstrate technique and drills, and stumbled across this...

 

 

Aside from the amusement value it got me thinking it might be beneficial during these earlier stages of learning to skate behind a 3 wheeled walker, which has brakes, which could be useful for skating down anything with steeper pitches, and learning t stops, hockey stops, skating on one foot, etc. In essence training wheels for blades.

 

One take could be "forget it, just stick with the skating until you get it, no crutches", but I'm curious if anyone has ever tried anything like this. Might be fun and possibly help with the learning curve.

post #71 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

I developed a passion for skiing this past winter and want to move things along in the off season, so amongst other activities I'm endeavoring to teach myself to rollerblade. Never skated as a kid, so it's been slow going, but I've graduated from holding on to counters in my kitchen to office complex parking lots with lots of running space and some degree of slope. Trying to get out for at least 30 minutes several evenings a week, and am getting better at controlling line with carved turns, but still need a fair amount of room if I pick up any significant speed.

 

I picked up a "Skate To Ski" tape off Amazon, and it has some good content, but I'm going to focus on getting stronger with rollerblading basics before I try to mix in ski poles. I've been looking online for videos that demonstrate technique and drills, and stumbled across this...

 

 

 

Aside from the amusement value it got me thinking it might be beneficial during these earlier stages of learning to skate behind a 3 wheeled walker, which has brakes, which could be useful for skating down anything with steeper pitches, and learning t stops, hockey stops, skating on one foot, etc. In essence training wheels for blades.

 

One take could be "forget it, just stick with the skating until you get it, no crutches", but I'm curious if anyone has ever tried anything like this. Might be fun and possibly help with the learning curve.


Maybe this thread...it migh be helpful :

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/71424/inline-skaters-who-also-ski

post #72 of 75

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post


Maybe this thread...it migh be helpful :

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/71424/inline-skaters-who-also-ski


Just read through it; thanks for the pointer!

post #73 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
Aside from the amusement value it got me thinking it might be beneficial during these earlier stages of learning to skate behind a 3 wheeled walker, which has brakes, which could be useful for skating down anything with steeper pitches, and learning t stops, hockey stops, skating on one foot, etc. In essence training wheels for blades.


Been keeping an eye out for a used walker on craigslist/eBay, but haven't found anything. Started thinking maybe I could just pick up a really cheap used bike, and then hacksaw it down to just the front part: handlebars, tube, fork, wheel, and, of course, brake. Then I found this...

 

 

I really do think something along this line (homemade/hacked or bought) would be useful for people just getting into skating.

post #74 of 75


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

I really do think something along this line (homemade/hacked or bought) would be useful for people just getting into skating.


You shouldn't need anything like that if you are balanced -front-to-back- on your skates.  

 

The third part of the first skating lesson I teach to newbies is on -front-to-back- balance and the tricks to find it.

 

By the time they are on the third lesson, a walker would hinder the skate-to-skate balance transfer.

 

Essentially, my advice here is: Get an Intro to Skating lesson from a pro.  

 

In less than 1 minute a pro can diagnose gear problems that would take months to sort on your own.  In 20 minutes a pro can give you balance and technique tools that would require /years/ to develop on your own.

 

2nd, 3rd etc lessons are up to you, but /get the first one/.

post #75 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

You shouldn't need anything like that if you are balanced -front-to-back- on your skates.  

 

Since the time I posted that I've focused on just skating. Not thinking about training wheels anymore. ;-)

 

Essentially, my advice here is: Get an Intro to Skating lesson from a pro.  

 

In less than 1 minute a pro can diagnose gear problems that would take months to sort on your own.  In 20 minutes a pro can give you balance and technique tools that would require /years/ to develop on your own.

 

I was motivated by skiing to start skating, and, (perhaps not surprisingly), I'm finding there are lots more parallels than I originally thought, particularly with regards to gear.

 

2nd, 3rd etc lessons are up to you, but /get the first one/.

 

Couldn't agree more, but unfortunately I haven't been able to find a pro in my area, so I've been using "Get Rolling" by Liz Miller and youtube videos to try and move things along until I can connect with someone.

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