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What kind of Biking holds your passion? - Page 4

Poll Results: Two wheel choice

 
  • 47% (35)
    Mountain Bike
  • 44% (33)
    Road Bike
  • 8% (6)
    Motorcycle - Road
  • 0% (0)
    Dirt Bike
74 Total Votes  
post #91 of 107
a balance of both road biking and mountain is good, i ride my mountain bike everywhere even on the road and pass guys on there cervelo race bikes. I find that amusing. The plus side to riding a heavy mountain bike everywhere is that once u get on the 18 pound road bike you will be able to ride farther and faster than anyone who has never ridden fat nobbies.
post #92 of 107

Road vs Mountain

So quick to judge and you don't even know me! Your attitude towards roadies sucks! Not everyone is ultra competetive, the guys I train with wait at the top of the hills and at the end of the intervals for stragglers. I've been on huge rides with 50 people, small rides with 4 people, 2 day events with 4,000 people. I wouldn't say roadies have any more attitude than those who ride mountain bikes.

Who cares if I can jump a log- there is no need to do that on a road bike, although most of the roadies I ride with are excellent bike handlers and could probably ride circles around you. I also know quite a few that cyclocross in the fall and they are excellent bike handlers as well, without huge shocks that you need or disk brakes, duh.

I don't drive an SUV, I drive a Subaru. But unless you live next to a trail, most Mountain bikes log more miles on the roof of the car than they do off road. Mountain bikes ARE NOT good for the environment. I don't know anyone who commutes to work on a mountain bike, but I do know many people that ride 20 miles each way to work on a road bike. That is cutting carbon emissions while you MTBers drive to the trail head.

Most snowboarders (not all) are pin heads. They plow all the snow off the trails, are generally reckless and slam into skiers. I ski mostly at areas that don't allow boarders. Call me a snob, see if I care or the people at ALTA or MRG care! We like it with no boarders!

Mountain bikes DESTROY TRAILS. And mountain bike riders are constantly cutting new single tracks. I firsthand saw the damage in a park we used to ride in California.

Why do you think so many places have BANNED mountain bikes? Because most mountain bikers are idiots who enjoy going out after a rain storm and riding in the mud, even though they know its destructive to the trails.

If you really want to enjoy nature, try walking on the trail, you might actually be able to go slow enough to identify plants and wildlife!



Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I have to flame closed minded people....which BTW is you.

Road biking is more social? please whens the last time you ever went on a MTB ride. Roadie are *******s, your post pretty much confirms this. I have actually ridden with roadie on MTBs and they pretty much suck to ride with. Ultra completive, douche bags. Plus what funny is they cant cross log or charge a rock garden to save there lifes.

MTB is destructive to the environment? have you ever seen what horses do to a trail? good mtb trails are built with the environment in mind, and smart MTBer want to conserve the trail and the areas around the trail. We ride there, part of the reason I ride is to get out and enjoy the views. I dont want this stuff to go bad I do my best to keep it that way.

Your probably drive some some huge automatic SUV to the store and back and your worried about the environment?

you hate snowboarders to? Do you ski on shaped skis? yep thanks snowboarder for that? is your local resort still open? without snowboarders it probably wouldnt be. Generally I have people I have found who think snowboarder are *******s, should look themselves in the mirror.
post #93 of 107

How Can I Vote? Poll Flawed!

Everyone Knows that (unlike skis) there is really only one real bike -

Attachment 2278
post #94 of 107
Yeah, I can't vote either as its like asking what type of skiing you're passionate about. To me it doesn't matter if I'm racing (SL, GS, SG or DH), or skiing powder, or skiing on frozen boilerplate in the rain - it's all good as long as I'm sliding down a hill (or climbing up it!).

Cycling is the same. I have a quiver, ride & race all of them, and enjoy to be on any of them - they're all good as long as I'm out pedaling. I enjoy each of them differently for what they are.

These days I spend most of my time on the road bike (~5500 miles so far this year), but only because it's "logistically" more efficient. I can jump on my road bike, ride right out the door, and get in a good workout in under 2 hours (heh ... +3/4 mile hill of up to 19% grade right out the front door). If I'm going to ride Mtb & cross I want to ride in those places that make it 'special', which means jumping in my car and schlepping all of my gear.

I guess my point is that they're all good. What's with the "roadie vs. mountain biker" comments? I thought that died years ago? ... Kind of like the boarder vs. skier thing (although boarders are lame ... joking ... kind of ... ).

I'm a cyclocross-mountain-roadie-riding-ski racing-big mountain-freeride- powder skier. A cylcomoudieracetainfrowderier if you will. Aren't you ? What's wrong with you ?
post #95 of 107
Perhaps I didn't make my point clear enough.

Real bikes have only one gear, and belong on the track!
post #96 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTripodi View Post
Perhaps I didn't make my point clear enough.

Real bikes have only one gear, and belong on the track!
Dude, you need to ride your "real" bike more often ... that things has to be what, 30 years old? Not that there is any problem with that, but as my tag line says - What are you, a curator?

The fact that you don't have brakes on it hints that you're a manly-man and have actually raced that thing.

Kidding aside I love fixies ("in" term for track bike).
post #97 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
So quick to judge and you don't even know me! Your attitude towards roadies sucks! Not everyone is ultra competetive, the guys I train with wait at the top of the hills and at the end of the intervals for stragglers. I've been on huge rides with 50 people, small rides with 4 people, 2 day events with 4,000 people. I wouldn't say roadies have any more attitude than those who ride mountain bikes.
because its hard to notice when you have that same attitude.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
Who cares if I can jump a log- there is no need to do that on a road bike, although most of the roadies I ride with are excellent bike handlers and could probably ride circles around you. I also know quite a few that cyclocross in the fall and they are excellent bike handlers as well, without huge shocks that you need or disk brakes, duh.
I would love to see you mates keep up with me on a 50 mile trail ride. cyclecross course are very technical easy as well and the only hard part are the hurdles and the proper way of doing them. beside the point is MTBing makes you a better skier than road biking could ever hope to.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
I don't drive an SUV, I drive a Subaru. But unless you live next to a trail, most Mountain bikes log more miles on the roof of the car than they do off road. Mountain bikes ARE NOT good for the environment. I don't know anyone who commutes to work on a mountain bike, but I do know many people that ride 20 miles each way to work on a road bike. That is cutting carbon emissions while you MTBers drive to the trail head.
you redeemed yourself with the subie. I have 2 trail system that i ride to here in utah but when i get board yes I will drive to a trail head. I use to ride to work on slick tired rigid MTB in pittsburgh but here in SLC my commute would be 12mile 3000 vertical feet of climbing on a canyon road. I value my life over the environment in this case. Also I would rather my biggest risk off injury come from a stupid mistake and not some driver who isnt paying attention.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
Most snowboarders (not all) are pin heads. They plow all the snow off the trails, are generally reckless and slam into skiers. I ski mostly at areas that don't allow boarders. Call me a snob, see if I care or the people at ALTA or MRG care! We like it with no boarders!
your a bunch of racist. and probably not that good of skier if you dont like boarders. boarder almost never bother me more than the worst cohorts of skiers. People suck get over it. It doesnt matter where you ski or board at.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
Mountain bikes DESTROY TRAILS. And mountain bike riders are constantly cutting new single tracks. I firsthand saw the damage in a park we used to ride in California.
yes we cause erosion on a poorly made trail. Horse are worst, hikers are better. We can go futher than hikers and down in american fork canyon I stopped to talk some hikers 5 miles from the nearest trail head to find out they had no water and still have while to go. I gave them what I had and coaster back to my car. On most trails a MTBing makes hiking obsolete. It wierd we get banned before the poop machines dust causing horses. IF you want to talk about enviromental destruction that what you should be looking at. IF MTBs are the ones building maintaining and using the trail, its not your problem so dont worry about it. MTber allways keep making new trail becuase old trail get demolished by motobikes and horses. Alot of areas in the western rockies start life as illegal trails that were legitimized though use. Fruita Colorado in probably the most well know of totally rogue trail system that is now being used and maintained by MTBers

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
Why do you think so many places have BANNED mountain bikes? Because most mountain bikers are idiots who enjoy going out after a rain storm and riding in the mud, even though they know its destructive to the trails.
I totally agree with out west people there are areas that should be totally off limits to anyone after a rain storm. Park city close there trails to all user in these conditions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
If you really want to enjoy nature, try walking on the trail, you might actually be able to go slow enough to identify plants and wildlife!
I walk trails that are unrideable all the time, its a very cool experince. On a ride though I am able to cover alot more ground and see more scenery. trust me I do stop. This is why I would rather MTB than Road bike. would rather get up in the mountains than look at the ugly city that is SLC. I want the overall look and feel of the wasatch to stay the same. I do my best as individual to keep it that way.
post #98 of 107
Just had to chime in with my own opinions …

I dont agree with the “mtb’s are bad for the environment” argument. There are mtb’ers that do cut too many trails and are bad for the environment just as there are snowboarders that are idiots, but that doesn’t mean they all are (well, okay maybe just a very small percentage of snowboarders aren’t idiots).

Mtb’s are not motorcycles. 1 hp = 746 watts. The average cyclist isn’t cranking out more than ½ horsepower at any given time. We're not breaking tires loose around every corner, and the psi footprint isn't much more than a hiker wearing boots. The only time I've seen significant trail erosion is perhaps during a race that takes place while it’s raining, and you have hundreds of riders going over the same muddy trail in a short period of time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
Who cares if I can jump a log- there is no need to do that on a road bike, although most of the roadies I ride with are excellent bike handlers and could probably ride circles around you. I also know quite a few that cyclocross in the fall and they are excellent bike handlers as well, without huge shocks that you need or disk brakes, duh.
My experience has been that anyone touting themselves as a pure “roadie” usually indicates they have comparatively worse mtb skills. When I’m riding/racing poorly on mtb I’ll even refer to myself a roadie …

Most of the hard-core riders I know race both (and cross), and almost everyone is stronger in one discipline than the other. That said some of the best riders I know come from mtb. They have other-worldly bike handling skills. They can race with the best of the roadies, and are already some the best of the mtb’ers. It’s no coincidence that many elite level mtb’ers switch to racing road successfully, but not so much the other way around.

It's not really fair to compare a cyclocrosser to a mtb'er, but then again someone that races cross can't be called a roadie either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
… the guys I train with wait at the top of the hills and at the end of the intervals for stragglers. …
You do intervals with a group? I prefer to be by myself when I'm whimpering in pain and have snot & drool coming out of my face.

I consider road riding more a solo activity as I’m typically focusing on a particular workout (snot & drool). Group road rides are obviously more social, but I prefer my ‘social’ group rides to be on a mtb.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
Most snowboarders (not all) are pin heads. They plow all the snow off the trails, are generally reckless …
This would be easier to argue against if as a whole they didn't continually do everyhting in their power to bolster the stereotype ...
post #99 of 107
Pinhead, in the skier's lexicon, is a name reserved for telemark skiers. You cannot earn this name by simply riding a snowboard, no matter how stupid you act. A very small % of snowboarders are pinheads. A small but significant % of pinheads are snowboarders.
post #100 of 107
I live on a dirt road. I drive to go for a road ride, but I can ride my mountainbike from my house. Your experience is not ine size fits all.

btw - water destroys trails, not mountain bikes.
post #101 of 107
Back when I was in college I could throw a leg over my mountain bike and drop into some pretty kick-ass singletrack about a hundred yards from my dorm room. Or ride ten minutes or so to miles of it. Legal and guilt-free, no less. Nice.

Then I got a road bike and I could throw a leg over that and climb into miles of country roads. Sweet.

Here in NY I collect a lot more road miles. It's a real PITA to get off-road, so unless I have a lot of time available I pretty much stick to the road bike. I like the sense of being away from the city that I get on the MTB, though, even when I'm in a city park. At least I can't see the city.

I have an old ten-speed that I'm using as a commuter. Currently more of a five-speed - I threw out the front derailleur when it seized. I don't commute over hills enough to need the small ring. If I'm on pavement, it's all about the drop bars.

All three styles of riding offer different things. Like a day off-piste against a day of carving beautiful linked turns. Unless you carve beautiful linked turns off-piste, in which case I hate you. Ultimately, though, all of them offer a quiet place in my mind. I don't see where it becomes necessary to attack people who like other versions of the sport. Especially road and off-road cycling - it's not like skiers and snowboarders carving different rhythms and radii down the same runs. Can't we all just go out and have fun?
post #102 of 107

Fixed for the winter

Hey that is a nice one, high flange hubs and all.
Agreed- a fixed gear is the purest form of bicycle!
Thats what I ride all winter too.



Quote:
Originally Posted by JTripodi View Post
Everyone Knows that (unlike skis) there is really only one real bike -

Attachment 2278
post #103 of 107

Fixed for the winter

You need to go further,
"Real bikes only have one FIXED gear" because anything else is a single speed.

We ride our fixed gear bikes on the road, although we do use hand brakes.




Quote:
Originally Posted by JTripodi View Post
Perhaps I didn't make my point clear enough.

Real bikes have only one gear, and belong on the track!
post #104 of 107

Road, mountain and CX

You're right! Here in Western NJ, most all our secondary roads are nice paved farm roads with little traffic on them. In Vermont, a lot of secondary roads are dirt and they're not going to be great on a road bike. If I lived in VT I would likely have a cyclocross bike to ride on "improved" dirt or gravel roads.

I found mountain biking in the Mad River Valley extremely difficult. Aside from slimy moss covered rocks that are as slippery as ice, the steepness of the trails is too much to stay aerobic.

I'm not saying you can't stay fit on an MTB, I am saying that you have much more control over your workout on a road bike.







Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I live on a dirt road. I drive to go for a road ride, but I can ride my mountainbike from my house. Your experience is not ine size fits all.

btw - water destroys trails, not mountain bikes.
post #105 of 107
Maybe it has gotten better the past few years. While well built trails will support MTB use, trail widening can happen in turns where the less skilled riders swing wide off the single track, rather than slow down. I saw quite a bit of trail destruction in Calif. in the heavily used parks that we used to ride in. Eventually it got so bad that they closed most of the single tracks to try to let the area recover. No one should be cutting new trails without permits!

I am definitely a roadie and will be the first to admit that I am not as good off road. When I used to MTB seriously, I would have no problem keeping up with the pure MTBers on the flats and climbs. It was only the technical downhills where they were much more fearless and better bike handlers.

If there was better off road in this area, I might try it again.

I train lots of miles solo, but there's no substitute for training with the cat 2/3 racers. When you have to take pulls in a 27-32 mph paceline it makes you stronger. You can do solo sprints, but its way more fun sprinting when there is someone to lead you out, or if you can lead out the other riders. Hillclimbing is also more fun with the group. I find I can't push myself nearly as hard when alone as I am with a group. It also lets you cover a lot more miles in the same training time.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodee View Post
Just had to chime in with my own opinions …

I dont agree with the “mtb’s are bad for the environment” argument. There are mtb’ers that do cut too many trails and are bad for the environment just as there are snowboarders that are idiots, but that doesn’t mean they all are (well, okay maybe just a very small percentage of snowboarders aren’t idiots).

Mtb’s are not motorcycles. 1 hp = 746 watts. The average cyclist isn’t cranking out more than ½ horsepower at any given time. We're not breaking tires loose around every corner, and the psi footprint isn't much more than a hiker wearing boots. The only time I've seen significant trail erosion is perhaps during a race that takes place while it’s raining, and you have hundreds of riders going over the same muddy trail in a short period of time.



My experience has been that anyone touting themselves as a pure “roadie” usually indicates they have comparatively worse mtb skills. When I’m riding/racing poorly on mtb I’ll even refer to myself a roadie …

Most of the hard-core riders I know race both (and cross), and almost everyone is stronger in one discipline than the other. That said some of the best riders I know come from mtb. They have other-worldly bike handling skills. They can race with the best of the roadies, and are already some the best of the mtb’ers. It’s no coincidence that many elite level mtb’ers switch to racing road successfully, but not so much the other way around.

It's not really fair to compare a cyclocrosser to a mtb'er, but then again someone that races cross can't be called a roadie either.

You do intervals with a group? I prefer to be by myself when I'm whimpering in pain and have snot & drool coming out of my face.

I consider road riding more a solo activity as I’m typically focusing on a particular workout (snot & drool). Group road rides are obviously more social, but I prefer my ‘social’ group rides to be on a mtb.

This would be easier to argue against if as a whole they didn't continually do everyhting in their power to bolster the stereotype ...
post #106 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by dantelman View Post
I train lots of miles solo, but there's no substitute for training with the cat 2/3 racers. When you have to take pulls in a 27-32 mph paceline it makes you stronger. You can do solo sprints, but its way more fun sprinting when there is someone to lead you out, or if you can lead out the other riders. Hillclimbing is also more fun with the group. I find I can't push myself nearly as hard when alone as I am with a group. It also lets you cover a lot more miles in the same training time.
Agree to everything you say, but I'd be surprised if those Cat2/3's are doing their intevrals & specific workouts in a group. If you've read the Cyclists Training Bible one of the "commandments" is to train with groups infrequently.

I typically race twice a week so I can only fit one hard group ride in per week. The group rides are spirited, but not race pace (well, not always anyway), and we're certainly not doing interval training. It would be impossible to do real interval training in a pace line.

We do however always work on sprinting by going for county line signs.
post #107 of 107

ALL the above....

Actually I enjoy all four of those choices. If I only did one I would burn out in no time. Variety IS the spice of life, no?

Percentage wise, I'd say;

Street m/c 35%
Road bike 35%
Dirt m/c 15%
Mtb 15%

It's all good :
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