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Talk me out of this....

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
We will be in Park City for Xmas-New Years.... About 11 days total....

Ski rentals are about $50 a day..... So 11 days @ $50 = $550...

I am thinking of buying my wife boots and skis instead of renting...

This will be only her second time skiing but she claims to really want to learn this time.... and I know the importance of properly fitted boots...

I think we can outfit her for almost the amount of the rental....

Am I nutz? :
post #2 of 22
Do It!
post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by triplenet View Post
We will be in Park City for Xmas-New Years.... About 11 days total....

Ski rentals are about $50 a day..... So 11 days @ $50 = $550...

I am thinking of buying my wife boots and skis instead of renting...

This will be only her second time skiing but she claims to really want to learn this time.... and I know the importance of properly fitted boots...

I think we can outfit her for almost the amount of the rental....

Am I nutz? :
You are on the right track.
She will learn better with consistent equipment, and will have more confidence.
You can always sell equipment and buy upgrades as you need.

Most important BOOTS!
Even if you don't buy skis, buy her boots! That can make all the difference in loving the sport.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Nice to see I am not the only one on the forum in the morning..

Thanks for the quick response..... I will take her to my boot guy and get boots...

Question: Any learner ski suggestions? I will ebay a pair of used ones for her and lug them there in my double bag...

She is 5'6... 128 lbs...

Thanks again
post #5 of 22
The best thing you can do for someone that wants to learn is to buy them boots.

Rental boots are notoriously poor. I'm sure you've heard stories about how well someone skis, and then to really impress, "even in rented boots!".

Let them rent some demos skis and make their own choice. It makes a big difference in peoples attitude when they bring their own experiences to the decision making table.

EDIT: Ebay is good once you know what you want.
post #6 of 22
Where do you live? Do you have a good local ski shop that can to the boot fitting?

As far as skis, does SierraJim have anything left?
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
In the ski capital of the world - Miami I need to move...

I have an OK guy down here... But they have a very small selection.. But they have a great selection of flip flops

I use "Dude" at Cole Sports in Park City for mine.... I may just try and get him to do it the first day we fly in - I need some work done on my Falcon 10's anyway.....

I would think used beginer skis could be had cheap on ebay... Long ago I purchased my first pair of learning skis (K2 Omnis) for about $200 new... They were great skis to improve the learning curve...
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Where do you live? Do you have a good local ski shop that can to the boot fitting?

As far as skis, does SierraJim have anything left?
He does!!! http://shop.sierrasnowboard.com/browse.cfm/2,519.html
Shall we move this over to gear?
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by triplenet View Post
In the ski capital of the world - Miami I need to move...

I have an OK guy down here... But they have a very small selection.. But they have a great selection of flip flops

I use "Dude" at Cole Sports in Park City for mine.... I may just try and get him to do it the first day we fly in - I need some work done on my Falcon 10's anyway.....

I would think used beginer skis could be had cheap on ebay... Long ago I purchased my first pair of learning skis (K2 Omnis) for about $200 new... They were great skis to improve the learning curve...
If you can deal with someone at the mountain, that is best for her, that way she can go back and forth if and when she needs anything.
post #10 of 22
These skis would be a nice ski that will grow with her for the first season.
For less than 300, after adding the binding.
http://shop.sierrasnowboard.com/browse.cfm/4,2538.htm
post #11 of 22
Another succumbs to the marketing hype that is women's skis. My wife had a pair she hated. She felt that the forward mount made her want to do over the handle bars -- she sat back as a result. Takes years to get over that when you begin that way.

Such skis are best suited for the occaisional skier that attends the mountain on family holidays in the same way people attend the beach. A couple runs in the morning, drinks after lunch and dancing after dinner. The skiing is just the backdrop for the real holiday -- not the meat of the matter.
post #12 of 22
Using a bit of a broad brush tere aren't you BigE?
post #13 of 22
I guess I shoula said IMNSHO!

I think they gave her a boat load of bad habits -- the instant she switched to unisex skis, her skiing improved. It was still full of bad habits, but was much better. Getting her on the right level of ski made all the difference in the world. At this point, I'm certain her binding ramp angle needs lowering.

There is more to picking and evaluating skis/binding than checking the sex of the skier. That plays no role whatsoever. Unless of course you prefer the stasis of the backseat, then by all means, go for it.

IMO.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
I guess I shoula said IMNSHO!

I think they gave her a boat load of bad habits -- the instant she switched to unisex skis, her skiing improved. It was still full of bad habits, but was much better. Getting her on the right level of ski made all the difference in the world. At this point, I'm certain her binding ramp angle needs lowering.

There is more to picking and evaluating skis/binding than checking the sex of the skier. That plays no role whatsoever. Unless of course you prefer the stasis of the backseat, then by all means, go for it.

IMO.
Big E I'm in agreement to a point.
I have always preferred unisex skis, but most women benefit from the dynamics of the women design.

Probably depends on the build and athleticism of the woman.
I'm fairly small yet athletic.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Big E I'm in agreement to a point.
I have always preferred unisex skis, but most women benefit from the dynamics of the women design.

Probably depends on the build and athleticism of the woman.
I'm fairly small yet athletic.
I agree ... I have one pair of women's skis with the forward mount that I like just fine, but they are narrow carver types. The next pair of women's skis were fatter, and I HATED the forward mount. So I moved it back, and it made a world of difference. The next pair I bought were unisex skis ...

And I'm struggling with this in boots, now as well. I am starting to shop for new ones, and as a woman with a 35" inseam, the lower and wider cuffs of women's boots are not at all what I need. So I'm keeping all options open.
post #16 of 22
Definately see Dudivar ("Dude") at Coles and get her boots- you can't go much wrong with Jan's, Surefoot or Bootworks either, (although there's opinions about each) the important thing is to schedule an appointment the first day and use the week to make any adjustments. Entry level boots should'nt take a lot of tweaking, but you want to be close to the shop the first few days. Skis are less important at this time. Find a good sale and low DIN bindings aren't expensive .
You guy's will have a blast. I won't be here. I did a house swap with some friends in... Brooklyn.:


P.S. Rule of thumb is buy boots retail. skis on sale. Because good bootfitters will discuss your ability, look at your foot, measure, fuss, etc. Recommend a short list of boots , get you the right boot and then customize it pretty much indefinately at no extra charge until you are a very happy camper.
As far as skis go,These look pretty good; http://shop.sierrasnowboard.com/browse.cfm/4,2538.htm but we can have a whole discussion on that...
I must get to work here...
post #17 of 22
I tend to agree with BigE... My wife skied a lot better on unisex than on women specific skis during her demo process. The sweet spot for her was around 165cm size. She is small and not super aggressive, but the length is appropriate for an adult. The lengths offered for many womens models make me think this was made for an grade school kid.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Big E I'm in agreement to a point.
I have always preferred unisex skis, but most women benefit from the dynamics of the women design.

Probably depends on the build and athleticism of the woman.
I'm fairly small yet athletic.
Well that what I've bolded is in total disagreement with what I'm saying.

Small and athletic to me, means only that the light weight of the ski is beneficial. The remainder of the womens design is built around the back seat -- literally.

Clearly, if the skier is small, so are the hips, and their position will have less of an impact. If the skier is a larger woman, with "generous" hips, the skiis will make her back seated position more comfortable. The bindings are moved forward to put the CM above the sweet spot of the ski. At first glance, this is a great idea, except that you are punished if you succeed in "getting forwards".

FWIW, I see more women on the unisex gear these days. Like "earth shoes" the fad is over.
post #19 of 22
I got my wife a set of tecnica attiva boots that fit, and a set of 154 K2 burnin luv's, and she went from greens to blues immediately. She even skiied a few blacks, with confidence..It made a lot of difference. I must have got lucky, as I bought both thru an ebay seller, and everything fit perfect, and she loves them..Im not saying it is the perfect way, but it worked for me.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
... At first glance, this is a great idea, except that you are punished if you succeed in "getting forwards".
....
I think this is the point ... for some women, "getting forwards" isn't going to happen. If they are forward far enough to put the weight in the right place, they are in an unnatural position.

But as you've found, not all are like that.
post #21 of 22
Bingo!
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Small and athletic to me, means only that the light weight of the ski is beneficial. The remainder of the womens design is built around the back seat -- literally.

Clearly, if the skier is small, so are the hips, and their position will have less of an impact. If the skier is a larger woman, with "generous" hips, the skiis will make her back seated position more comfortable. The bindings are moved forward to put the CM above the sweet spot of the ski. At first glance, this is a great idea, except that you are punished if you succeed in "getting forwards".

FWIW, I see more women on the unisex gear these days. Like "earth shoes" the fad is over.
When I said, small, I wasn't referring to hips.
And believe it or not, the "counter weight" some women have may make a difference.

There are different reasons for liking the balance of unisex skis, but no matter the reason, its all about personal preference, and also the properties of the ski.
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