or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Snow higher than top of boot: work? pleasure?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Snow higher than top of boot: work? pleasure?

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Powder: pain in the ass, or pleasure?
post #2 of 37
Thread Starter 
Prompted by a post here; I'm just curious.
post #3 of 37
The question is FLAWED, oh, that's Fox's line. sorry WTFH.

You didn't say where the snow was, in your driveway or on a 40 degree pitch?

One is work the other pleasure. [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #4 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by Max Capacity:
The question is FLAWED, oh, that's Fox's line. sorry WTFH.
Actually...

When the snow gets over my boots I have to untuck my ski pants from them or the snow will get in and make my feet cold. I don't like having cold feet, so I usually go inside and warm up next to the fireplace.
post #5 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by Max Capacity:
in your driveway or on a 40 degree pitch?
same difference
post #6 of 37
Of course my reference is purely Eastern Pow.... Hey you western folk, come on out and give it a try some time [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

Actually it is flawed.... there's heavy over the boot = work.
Then there's the light stuff = pleasure.

Here we get almost exclusively heavy, except during the blizzard last President's day weekend. That was truly heaven. The exception, not the rule.
post #7 of 37
I don't think the poll is flawed; I think the post that spawned the poll is flawed. The post that Ryan refers to was a momentary loss of consciousness on the part of a Bear who will remain feal-less. Oops, sorry, I meant nameless. How careless of me.

Besides, snow above the top of my boots when standing in my driveway generally means two things:

</font>
  1. Deep powder awaits me less than 30 minutes drive from home.</font>
  2. I better get the bigger of my two snowblowers out of the garage . . . so I can get to the mountain and suffer the inconvenience of that deep snow sooner. </font>
Snow above my boot-tops when standing on my skis means there must be a smile on my face and a song in my heart . . . [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

IG
post #8 of 37
Thread Starter 
simply, the statement...

"For the vast majority of skiers on any mountain, anything over the top of the boot is more work than pleasure"

got my attention. And I became curious. Not that epicski provides a representative cross-sample - after all, we're only comprised of skiers of all abilities, preferences, location and experience - but it seemed a good enough place to start.
post #9 of 37
Wet and heavy or dry and light, it matters not to me. It's just so rare to get any deep freshies here that even if I'm slogging in the muck and planting my face all day, I'm still giddy, goofy to be there.
post #10 of 37
Even when I am working as hard as I can in waist deep Cascade Concrete...I am loving every minute of, it as long as the slope is steep enough.

[ November 17, 2003, 02:10 PM: Message edited by: eb ]
post #11 of 37
It would be a little blasphemous for any self respecting skier or boarder to say deep powder was painful. Like other poster, it is so rare for me that I'd take a winter of sierra cement just for the sake of variety. I can, however, relate to the pain aspect somewhat. Once I skied 2 feet of heavy new snow in Aspen for a couple of days and it was VERY challenging and tiring. In the east I've skied 6 or more inches of feather light pow probably less than a dozen times over 3+ decades (pathetic isn't it), but never more than about 12"-15" deep. At that depth, pow is total pleasure or more accurately, Nirvana. The deepest pow I've skied in since switching to shaped skis a couple years ago is only about 6". I used to handle the 12" depth with relative ease with skinny skis. I'm interested to see how it feels with the shaped skis. I loved the way my skinny skis and boots would sink out of sight so that the movement of the skis goes to an all "feel" mode and no sight. I'm not sure I'd like the way these new fangled "fat boys" would ski if they kept me mostly on top of the pow?? Anybody want to tell me how fat boys work/feel in deep pow compared to skinny skis?
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by jamesj:
Anybody want to tell me how fat boys work/feel in deep pow compared to skinny skis?
They work great and feel better. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #13 of 37
He phibs!
Phat skis BLOW in deep pow compared to skinny skis.
Phats were made for the cord(!!!), baby.

[ November 17, 2003, 02:21 PM: Message edited by: Mescalero ]
post #14 of 37
OK,

I deserve all of the ribbing I'm getting!

I wonder how the response would have been if the poll mentioned it was knee deep at 08:45, and chopped and crud on the lift served runs by 10:00.

Just like people of an average nature on the ski slopes(not necessarily Bears) don't feel they have to have 500 inches of annual snow to have a good time, average Joe might rather ski all day on a good well maintained powder surface than get 2 or 3 powder runs and the rest of the day is crud and chop.

To the powder hounds, I concede complete incompetence in my responses. ...I just don't buy into the idea that most resorts see the powder faction as the majority of their skier base, although they probably admit to most powder hounds being some of their more vocal guests.
post #15 of 37
Thread Starter 
In other words, you were the lone work vote?

Obviously just giving you some (heh heh) "feedback" there, feal. We all need a little "feedback" once in awhile.

A note: before i began to get a "powder clue," sure, it wasn't easy skiing, and damn frustrating, knowing I was THAT close to having a great time. I have to say, though, even struggling was kinda fun.
And yes, I did wonder "what's all the fuss about?" until I began to get it, leaving the groomer technique behind.
post #16 of 37
Ryan,

It wasn't me!

Although I don't have the skills to really work the stuff, I still enjoy it. ...But I hate the crap left behind after all the fun. I hope to move to some fats this year so the 'leftovers' aren't quite so much of a misery.
post #17 of 37
Thread Starter 
feal,

stay with it, it gets better. then it gets pretty damn great. it WILL come.

[ November 17, 2003, 03:03 PM: Message edited by: ryan ]
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by feal:
Ryan,

...But I hate the crap left behind after all the fun. I hope to move to some fats this year so the 'leftovers' aren't quite so much of a misery.
feal,

Ryan is absolutely correct, stay with it. In my opinion you have to be a better technical skier to ski crud than you do to ski powder. So, the good news is, when your skiing improves and you are ripping lines through the powder - you'll be having just as much fun in the crud a little later in the day. Spend your money on a lesson rather than a few more millimeters under foot.

I'm glad to see that you have taken a good natured ribbing so well; a gold star on your forehead today.

IG
post #19 of 37
never had the pleasure.
post #20 of 37
Pure, bliss. Like Wayne's World; "It makes me feel kinda funnnny" [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

I'll take pow for a few hours in the morning and the push piles/chop for the rest of the day over groomed anytime.
post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by feal:
Ryan,

It wasn't me!

Although I don't have the skills to really work the stuff, I still enjoy it. ...But I hate the crap left behind after all the fun. I hope to move to some fats this year so the 'leftovers' aren't quite so much of a misery.
Feal,

There's just about as much fun in the 'leftovers' as there is in the first course. Finding the "joy of crud" is a worthwhile goal to reach for and it's not as hard as it might seem. Start with a really fat pair of skis, add a retraction movement with both legs together, and go for the joy ride. Once discovered you might not want to spend much time on the groomed (unless of course it's in search of the perfect carve!)
post #22 of 37
Getting midfats (K2 Axis) changed my outlook on crud. On my old gear, I always sought out powder but retreated to the groomers when it began to get cut up. These days I really enjoy crud, not as much as powder, but way more than the groomers. Midfats made the difference.
post #23 of 37
Um,
I seem to remember one of the last times I was skiing powder with someone else who has posted here, that it wasn't the depth of the snow, but the angle of his boots to the snow. While I was enjoying the light powder, I could have sworn he was finding it getting higher than the top of his boots (actually, if you looked at him aferwards, you'd have thought that it was up to his head.

Now, where's that photo...



S
post #24 of 37
In the East, powder turns to crud very quickly due to the large number of skiers on limited terrain. And since our "powder" is on the heavy side, the crud can be fearsome. You need to learn to handle it if you are to enjoy any heavy snow falls around here. I do agree that heavy crud is a nightmare for less experienced skiers. I have seen my wife easily handle very steep groomed run in Fernie and totally break down in heavy crud. Her tendency to rush turns and pivot the skis are killing her in crud.

Personally I would take crud any day over the hard and icy conditions we normally get.
post #25 of 37
More is better than less. Over the boot = pleasure. I'd have to say the further it gets over my boot, I'll be working as little as possible.
post #26 of 37
Maybe a perspective from the less experienced. Powder is pleasure but...

This past season was the first time I really got to experience much in the way of powder. Start with day 17 skiing of my life and about half a foot of new heavy, wet snow and snowing heavily all day (and the next and the next). By the next morning there was about another 1.5 feet of heavy snow. It was very hard work. Sometimes it was pure pleasure and sometimes I was hating my life. Moving around the mountain and going from powder to crud to groomed sections to bumps covering in varying amounts of powder and crud was definate work. With the snow being rather wet, it made it all that much more work. So I can sympathize with those who have a hard time with it. If you haven't seen it or do not see it often, you might not enjoy it. But the last day the snow turned to smoke and was thigh deep. Met up with a Bear and had a day of pleasure. I want more.
post #27 of 37
I thought this was a trick question at first. Are you kidding me? What could be more pleasure than laying lines on a thirty degree slope leaving all those that follow with a face full of "Cold Smoke"

If I had my way, there would be no grooming machines anywhere on the planet.
post #28 of 37
Ryan, as many have expressed, the question does not have much meaning unless the quality of powder is also considered. When the air temperature at considerable altitude is just above 32 degrees F, snow regardless of whether one is in Little Cottonwood Canyon in Utah, Lake Tahoe, or a low elevation resort in Vermont is going to be wet and mushy. Add rain on the snow and it gets worse. Add slightly below freezing temperatures on wet snow that makes it like a thick wet cement and it gets impossibly worse than simply being frozen hard. Even boot top snow can be difficult for advanced powder skiers in the later conditions. Conversely if skiers only familliar with typical Eastern powder were exposed to dry light fluff, they would quickly see things in a different light.

Narrow your question and I'll bother to offer an opinion. -dave
post #29 of 37
Thread Starter 
it was good-natured ribbing of a rhino-skinned bear who showed class by going with it, as the earlier replies indicated, and that's all it was.

so, my thanks to feal, for providing the "inspiration" and for rolling with the friendly punches.

edit: as fox would rush to indicate (and has, more than a couple times), i am no expert in powder, though i do okay in it and am getting better. i can attest to the fact that some VARIETIES of powder are hardly "easy" for many and that forgetting the groomer technique before getting into thicker stuff is well-advised. the deep snow i got at kirkwood last year was noticeably different from that which i found at alta and required me to be more "active," for example.

anyway, everybody who first "got it" when they skied the pow raise their hand.

[ November 19, 2003, 02:31 PM: Message edited by: ryan ]
post #30 of 37
ry,
I'm raising my hand, but only to get you to come along and pull me out of the pow.

I'm certainly nowhere near an expert in it, but I enjoy it, and isn't that the reason for skiing?

[img]smile.gif[/img]

S
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Snow higher than top of boot: work? pleasure?