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Race stock bindings DIN setting - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by race View Post
Why? Can someone tell me why it is better to use the middle of the DIN scale?
I've heard in the dim and distant past that setting a binding at the top of it's range would result in the binding having less elastic travel before it released, and be more likely to not be accurate at the bottom of its range over time. Too much elastic travel gives the binding a longer time to work on your knees. Too little can be a detriment to retention. I haven't studied the new bindings in detail, but I think the elastic travel should be within acceptable limits on the FKS (going by reputation). Maybe someone who works with modern bindings can enlighten us. How consistent is the elastic travel with different settings?
post #32 of 46
The O.P. will be fine on the FKS set at 8. Well, I should say the binding will function fine, who knows what will happen to the O.P. but it won't be the bindings fault.

It is better to be on a high performance binding set low than a recreational binding set high. IMO.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
It is better to be on a high performance binding set low than a recreational binding set high. IMO.

Agreed, as long as by high performance we're talking p18s, 916s, etc. When you start getting din ranges that start at 15+, its a whole other story. I can't understand why 16 or 18 din isn't enough for some people, but every once in a while I see people with 20+ din bindings. Weird.
post #34 of 46
It is always recommended to ski bindings set somewhat above or below the min and max.
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by race View Post
Hi,

I am interested in getting a new pair of race stock skis.

I am a non-racer, weigh 150 lbs., 5 foot 11. I want to use the Rossi for freeskiing.

Thank you.

Jim
Why on earth are you looking at a race stock ski for freeskiing???? :

Race stock skis are built for one thing - racing! They suck at freeskiing.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski View Post
Why on earth are you looking at a race stock ski for freeskiing???? :

Race stock skis are built for one thing - racing! They suck at freeskiing.
I noticed a difference in a all metal housed 11-17 DIN 997 vs. a Composite housed 4-12 DIN 912 for free skiing. Particularly with a wider type freeski, the metal housing was much more responsive on the wider ski. I did end up taking them back off because I was unwilling to risk my knees skiing a binding that far out of my DIN range. I wasn't so much concerned with the high speed crash, I knew it would come off there, it was the slower crash where the binding was set too high to be able to compensate.
post #37 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by race510 View Post
It is always recommended to ski bindings set somewhat above or below the min and max.

Why?

The conclusion is that the FKS 185 will operate effectively and safely at 8 DIN. Please tell me why you do not agree with the others. Maybe you saw some specific data that supports this.
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I noticed a difference in a all metal housed 11-17 DIN 997 vs. a Composite housed 4-12 DIN 912 for free skiing. Particularly with a wider type freeski, the metal housing was much more responsive on the wider ski. I did end up taking them back off because I was unwilling to risk my knees skiing a binding that far out of my DIN range. I wasn't so much concerned with the high speed crash, I knew it would come off there, it was the slower crash where the binding was set too high to be able to compensate.
Attempted hijack, I was talking about the skis, not the bindings. I have Rossi FKS155 on my new fatties and love them
post #39 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski View Post
Why on earth are you looking at a race stock ski for freeskiing???? :

Race stock skis are built for one thing - racing! They suck at freeskiing.
IMO race stock skis ski better than consumer race skis. If you push them harder the difference is even more visible. I skied both consumer and race stock skis. I prefer the race stock versions.
I skied the Volkl race stock SL (pre Racetiger version) and now i will be getting the Rossi which is a very soft ski. IMO some race stock skis are more forgiving than others. I have some info on race stock skis from a Japanese website. It is no longer available. They tested race stock skis from the most important manufacturers. The Rossi and Dynastar were the softest and most forgiving skis of the bunch. Others were stiff and unforgiving like the Nordica Dobermann.
The Volkl Racetiger is stiffer and more unfogiving than the Rossi/Dynastar.
post #40 of 46
DIN - http://www.din.de/cmd;jsessionid=EC4...&languageid=en

If it is marked at DIN 8 it will release at DIN 8 - that is the whole point of having a standard.

The Look bindings are one of the best available.

The old myth of mid range - compete rubbish. DIN setting is related to spring tension - higher DIN more tension. Almost no tension on a spring that is designed to operate at 8-18 if it is set at 8 so there is not going to be any tension related spring fatigue. If you are operating at the other end which you have told us you are not then it makes sense from a conservative material fatigue point of view to back one's bindings off when not using them. Or just keep them set on the high setting and get them tested at the start and end of each season as recommended by the manufacturers.

Part of the DIN rating is that the binding operates accurately at any setting within the specified range consistently.

Set it at 8, test it at 8, ski it at 8, go back and test it again and it will release at 8 unless is has been damaged through skiing. Given that race stock bindings are almost all metal and the springs are housed internally this is highly unlikely.

Get the good binding (ie all metal no/ less plastic) and enjoy your skiing. Let the shop test it as safe at 8 and then sign the waiver that says you are happy skiing above what they recommend for your height/ weight, boot sole length & skier type.

This happens to me every year, 6'2", 195lbs, 306mm, type 3 and I should be a DIN 6 or 7 - yeah right, if I skied at that setting I would spend half my day retrieving my skis. I ski at 10 when free skiing (170-180 cm skis), 12 on my all mountain skis (193cm/ 94mm waist) and 12-14 on my race skis. I get them tested in the shop so I know that they are working properly and just sign the waiver that I will ski them at a higher setting than recommended on the DIN scale. I am happy and the shop is happy.

A good quality binding will throw you out when you need to depart from your skis in order to avoid an injury. I am amazed at how little rotational force it requires to eject even when I am set on 12.

Lastly if you like skiing race stock skis enjoy them - good on you.
post #41 of 46
Thread Starter 
Thank you for your response!
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post
It is always recommended to ski bindings set somewhat above or below the min and max.
As opposed to?
post #43 of 46
I think you can purchase Salomon LAB bindings with or without the ZZ SL or ZZ GS lifters. I like that there are two maybe three versions:

LAB 914 DIN 6-14
LAB 916 DIN 9-?

I remember choosing the LAB 914 over the LAB916 because the 916s DIN started at 9 and max out to ? I personally prefer that 9 is in the middle of the DIN range of a binding. Besides the difference in springs they are identical- all metal (mostly) versus the Equipe FIS 916 which mix plastic and metal parts. Yes, the LAB series are heavier than the Equipe FIS model.

My point is I prefer to choose a binding where my DIN setting are roughly in the middle of the DIN range of the binding NOT the minimum DIN setting.
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MammothMtnDreamerInJapan View Post
LAB 914 DIN 6-14
LAB 916 DIN 9-?
16.

914 -> up to 14 DIN
916 -> up to 16 DIN
920 -> up to 20 DIN
etc.
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MammothMtnDreamerInJapan View Post
I think you can purchase Salomon LAB bindings with or without the ZZ SL or ZZ GS lifters. I like that there are two maybe three versions:

I remember choosing the LAB 914 over the LAB916 because the 916s DIN started at 9 and max out to ? I personally prefer that 9 is in the middle of the DIN range of a binding. Besides the difference in springs they are identical- all metal (mostly) versus the Equipe FIS 916 which mix plastic and metal parts. Yes, the LAB series are heavier than the Equipe FIS model.
Salomon race bindings are available only without the plates. For whatever reason, Salomon puts the plate in the catalogue pictures which seems to cause some confusion. All 916's have similar (metal) construction with the difference being the connected heel (freeflex) on the LAB/ZZ version and fixed heel on the Equipe. Weight between the two versions is pretty much negligible; both are boat anchors.
post #46 of 46
race, is it possible for you to trade or sell those bindings for non-race ones. You should be able to sell them to some racer and they usually cost more.
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