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Your worst "dry run"?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
In my 44 years of skiing I've had plenty of ski trips ruined for a number or reasons. But probably the worst is the "dry run" or taking the time to get packed, travel to a ski area, and not (usually by choice) not ski.

For myself, my worst "dry run" had to be a planned 4-day trip to Mt. Bachelor in Oregon. Late in the season, a friend and I spent 6 hours driving there, and checked into our motel (a real flea bag) for the night, naturally with visions of skiing from the top of the mountain in great weather and fresh pow, something that Mt. Bachelor is known for.

The reality? We woke up at 6:30 the next morning to pouring down rain, 6 - 8 inches of standing water in the ski area parking lot. Needless to say, we bagged it and drove home.

12 hours of driving... no skiing! That's my worst, what's yours?

Mike
post #2 of 18
Not quite the same, but a similar vein...

A coworker and I were on a day trip to Killington just before Christmas one year. He was supposed to go to NJ afterwards to spend the holiday with his girlfriend and her parents, so we had separate cars.

Towards the end of the ski day, it starts snowing like crazy. I decide to stay over, and he decides to stay too, angry girlfriend consequeces be damned. We find a cheap room then go eat dinner and have a few beers.

About midnight we came out of bar and discover the snow had turned to rain. It's raining buckets - not only is the new snow gone, most of the old snow is gone.

My buddy looks at me and says, "Oh ****. I have to go to New Jersey." I couldn't convince him to get some sleep and leave in the morning. He dropped me off at my car and left right then.

(I guess she did forgive him - they eventually got married.)
post #3 of 18
got to Calabogie Peaks once when it was closed due to a storm. Only wasted a half a day driving though, and the drive was fun.
post #4 of 18


That is Sugarbush North...mid January. Worst family ski trip evah. We left after one day of a 5 day trip.
post #5 of 18
One year I got some time in my hands. So I drove up to Maine, having heard so much about the resorts. Day one was boiler plate ice. I found that out after coming down the bunny slope alone. Everyone else was in the lodge drinking and watching this fool sliding all the way down from the top to the bottom without making a single turn. Leaving the resort, spun out on some black ice... the rest gets worse...

Another time was out west. It's so warm it's not even funny. I went hiking instead! But that wasn't really so bad. Dry? Yes. Had a great time nonetheless.
post #6 of 18
I've had lots of weather caused "dry runs" over the years, usually wind or rain caused, but those kind I can take in stride. However last Memorial Day weekend was one Powder Corp caused that still rattles my cage. Had the big plans to go to Bend, Or. for sun hiking and SKIING at MT Bachelor. Extra time off, reservations, ect. We've done this several times in years past, It makes a nice footnote to the ski season. This year powder crap er corp decides at the last minute to close one week early for first time ever grrrrrr. Went anyway and did a day at Mt Hood so the trip turned out ok anyway.
post #7 of 18
Western Canada, Interior BC about 3 or 4 years back. I went with a group of 8 guys, all hard-core skiers. We had a house rented in Nelson. We had 3 days of cat skiing booked and paid for. We had a pineapple express. It rained. It poured. Then it snowed some really heavy, wet crap on top, only at the higher altitudes. Avalanche danger was extremely high. What skiing there was completely sucked. We all called our airlines and bailed early.
post #8 of 18
Hmm 3 years ago, booked a 5 day vacation at Killington with my GF and her family (6 of us), weather was amazing with plenty of snow the day before I arrived, from then on it was rain every day, I skiied one day in the drizzle, the other four were rained out. Spent the rest of my time visiting the outlets, killing time and wasting money. Temperatures rose all the way into the lower 60s, the base area was a muddy nightmare. Luckily Killington credited my multiday passes and we were able to leave the hotel a day early.

Second worse was also at Killington, after a great snow year, I decided to go for one last blast in the Spring. I kept hearing ads on the radio of how much snow they still had and that most the trails were still open so I convinced a friend to go up there with me. When we got there at night it was warm...like 70s warm, not good, but weather changes. That it did to almost 80 degrees the following morning; it turned out to be a record breaking warm day. After a full season the base area mud smelled worse than low tide and the mountain was just one big slushy mogul trail. I hate moguls, and my friend is not too fond of them either, so much so that after he got off the lift he found an attractive female that was also very intimidated by a landscape that looked like it had been aerial bombed, and seized the opportunity to kick it to her. They rode the lift back down together while I made a fool out of myself trying to negotiate the VW sized bumps as they mocked me overhead. We then went home....spring skiing, highly overrated, and not for me.
post #9 of 18
I've had 2 years recently in late March in UT with record breaking warm temps (60's). It's sad when you head up/down LCC and BCC and pass people riding their bikes in shorts, hiking and shorts, and rock climbing in shorts in March. Then again, besides those 2 years, it has been a heaven there at that time with dump after dump. Still got to ski though.
post #10 of 18
Years ago when my husband still skied and before our daughter was born, we went up to Butternut Basin, MA, to spend Christmas. They had snow, but I believe the whole mountain wasn't open yet. The day we arrived, it started raining in the evening. We spent the evening drinking tawny port with the B&B owners (Seekonk Pines, I wonder if they are still there...) since we were the only guests. I woke up the next day with the kind of hangover you only get from sweet red wine and the ski area had been totally rained out. So we left and drove to my in-laws in NJ, with me puking the whole way.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Years ago when my husband still skied and before our daughter was born, we went up to Butternut Basin, MA, to spend Christmas. They had snow, but I believe the whole mountain wasn't open yet. The day we arrived, it started raining in the evening. We spent the evening drinking tawny port with the B&B owners (Seekonk Pines, I wonder if they are still there...) since we were the only guests. I woke up the next day with the kind of hangover you only get from sweet red wine and the ski area had been totally rained out. So we left and drove to my in-laws in NJ, with me puking the whole way.
According to my dad, born and raised in Portugal, port wine hangover is the worse kind there is, sounds like you can vouche for that.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
According to my dad, born and raised in Portugal, port wine hangover is the worse kind there is, sounds like you can vouche for that.
Having had a mis-spent youth, I think that sweet red wine is the worst for puking, but that vodka gives the worst headache. I fell down a flight of stairs and tried to jump out of a car doing 60 with vodka. Next day a cat walking across the carpet was enough to make my head pound.

A second experience with sweet wine (muscat in Austria) caused a two day hangover and a desire to be left on the cobblestone sidewalk rather than walk another block home.

All this experience means I used up my drink allowance when I was younger. I'm a one beer/one wine/one cocktail type now.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Having had a mis-spent youth, I think that sweet red wine is the worst for puking, but that vodka gives the worst headache. I fell down a flight of stairs and tried to jump out of a car doing 60 with vodka. Next day a cat walking across the carpet was enough to make my head pound.

A second experience with sweet wine (muscat in Austria) caused a two day hangover and a desire to be left on the cobblestone sidewalk rather than walk another block home.

All this experience means I used up my drink allowance when I was younger. I'm a one beer/one wine/one cocktail type now.
My kinda girl!!!
post #14 of 18
Drinking a 40 oz of Jack Danials can give you a mean hangover too.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Drinking a 40 oz of Jack Danials can give you a mean hangover too.
More like a coma
post #16 of 18
I'll bite. I drove from Bolton Landing New York to Waitsfield Vt one beautiful spring day, kitted up in lightweight climbing pants and a hoodie, looking for a last crack at Mad River Glen. Made good time too, just one stop for a leak. Got to the MRG parking lot and found that... the place was closed. Very disappointed. For me, Sugarbush is a very second-best option, but at that point, what was I gonna do? So I drove over to Warren, parked, grabbed skis and walked up to the window to buy a lift ticket, pissed off too, 'cause in those days an MRG pass was like $18 bucks, who knows what Sugarbush was charging. Didn't matter as it turned out, because I couldn't find my wallet. Seems I'd lost it on that pee stop (never did find it, despite going back to look twice). All of which made for a pretty disappointing day. Oh, i did hike up the road and ski down the practice slope a couple times (even made some tracks!). But all in all, a pretty shitty day.
post #17 of 18
As a recreational skier, doing mostly day trips and often with much family in tow, I don't usually take a chance on iffy weather or operating conditions that could lead to a complete bust/dry run. But I have sucked it up and skied through a few bone soaking rain/sleet days in recent years
This wasn't a real horrendous dry run, but involves a "lost" ski area and sadly cost me one entry on my lifetime list of ski areas that I have skied. During the early spring of 1970 (plus or minus a year) when I was a young teen I made a two hour drive with my folks from Wash DC to a Virginia ski area near the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. We were surprised to find the ski area closed and mostly snowless. After looking around for a few minutes we just drove back home. Bummer. My dad was usually very thorough in his ski trip preparations so I'm not sure why he was so badly off target on this outing. I never returned to the ski area and it closed a few years later in the spring of 1974. In its last years it was known as Rappahannock Ski Area, but was originally called Skyline when it opened in the early '60s, and then Big Devil for a few years. I think my visit was during the Big Devil era. Here's more on this lost ski area: http://www.dcski.com/lostareas/viewlostprofile.php?id=2
post #18 of 18
In terms of pure distance, I think I've got everyone beat.

Denver to Kitzbuehel via a weird routing that had us going to Vegas, LAX, then to Munich, then by train to Kitz. This past March.

Granted, this was also partially a "mileage run" on a "mistake fare" - the whole trip was about $350 and I earned enough miles that it more than paid for it (and helped pay for the Portillo trip flights). But the original intention when I saw this fare was to do a long-weekend skiing in Kitzbuehel.

Meanwhile, in January I break my shoulder and the doctor won't let me ski until about a week before the trip. But Lisamarie is coming along and she wants to ski. When you have a $300 fare that has a $200 change fee (and would normally be a $700 fare so re-using it would have been a total loss) but if you fly it, you earn about $400-500 worth of benefits, what the heck, you go anyway.

We travel for hours DEN-LAS-LAX-MUC on United and Lufthansa, then a brief overnight in Munich then on to Deutsche Bahn and Austria Rail. Get to Kitz and it looks like this:


I am not going to try a white ribbon of death with a barely healed low-functional arm. Meanwhile LM was game to go - until she got desperately sick with the cold from hell somewhere between LAX and Munich. By the time she got to Kitz she could barely breath or stand up - spent almost the entire time sick in our room at the ironically named "wellness hotel".

About 14 thousand miles traveled by air and a few hundred by land - and neither of us wanted to attempt skiing. I suppose if we'd both been healthy upon arrival we would have tried it. If it had been epic conditions, we would have tried it even though sick/injured.

The only good things that came out of it, other than 28,000 frequent flyer miles and requalifying as "elite" (for more perks) for me and 14,000 miles for Lisa (which will help her qualify as "elite" on United this year) were:
  • I developed a serious liking for spaetzle.
  • I won a couple hundred bucks in 20 minutes at the slots while laying over in Vegas.
  • Oh yeah the bratwurst stand in the Munich train station is killer.

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