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Gloves

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I can't believe that I'm going into my 32nd ski season and I'm still nervous in anticipation of the coming season. I hope we have a better winter in WV this year. Skiing really didin't get decent until the end of January last year.

Well, I digress, Since the skiing in WV is generally not that challenging for me I went into snowboarding. I bought some Burton gloves! These are the most excellent gloves. I wear them for skiing now also. I was wondering what ski specific gloves people here are using. I would like to get some nice ski gloves for this year. I would prefer to stay away from leather because of the high maintenance.
post #2 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
I can't believe that I'm going into my 32nd ski season and I'm still nervous in anticipation of the coming season. I hope we have a better winter in WV this year. Skiing really didin't get decent until the end of January last year.

Well, I digress, Since the skiing in WV is generally not that challenging for me I went into snowboarding. I bought some Burton gloves! These are the most excellent gloves. I wear them for skiing now also. I was wondering what ski specific gloves people here are using. I would like to get some nice ski gloves for this year. I would prefer to stay away from leather because of the high maintenance.
Look into Marmot, Black Diamond, EMS, probably many other of the high-end names have excellent offerings.
post #3 of 27
HESTRA!!!! check out Sierra trading for a great selection of many kinds of gloves. http://www.sierratradingpost.com/d/2...d-Mittens.html

I just looked, their selection is a bit thin right now.
post #4 of 27
I don't know that leather is really all that high maintenance.



"Work Glove" for snow concept , though I usually look for a wrist tensioner
post #5 of 27
John, a little Nikkwax goes a long way. http://www.nikwax.co.uk/en-us/produc...=1&fabricid=19

a little minkoil or similar works too.
post #6 of 27
I have a pair of Drop gloves, which are really for snowboarding, these are my warmest and most expensive gloves, they came with a seperate liner and have a pocket on top for venting or heat pack. Next I have Grandoe, which have a metal valve on them to supposedly vent out moisture without letting cold in, and that also have a pocket. Lastly I have my race gloves, Reusch Samuari GS, which get the least use and the paint on the leather is looking more worn than it should and the gloves are not warm at all IMHO.
post #7 of 27
Swany's really keep your hands warm. A pair of fabric/leather combo only last a season for me (keep in mind I'm on the snow with them 100+ days per season); friends with a like amount of snow days use the all-leather Swany's and they have a longevity of 3 years or so.
post #8 of 27
I have 2 pairs of these.

Rated at 5° to 25°F, these superlative Cloudveil gloves protect your hands from biting cold and dangerous outside wetness. Natural and technical man-made materials ensure warmth and protection Palm, finger and thumb facings are SuperSteer™ washable, water-resistant leather Schoeller Dynamic™ with 3XDRY® waterproof, breathable backs Schoeller WB-400 stretch knuckle panels Primaloft® One insulation Wraptor™ construction Hydrofil® moisture-transport lining Snow-sealing cuff Snotnose® thumb

post #9 of 27
Lloyd, what model are these? Nice gloves.
post #10 of 27
One word: MITTENS. Really, really BIG difference in warmth vs. gloves. I use combo leather/goretex, swear 100% by them.
post #11 of 27
Last year I started using insulated work gloves for medium cold days and a better pair of Marmot gloves for damp or colder days. The work gloves were $7 a pair, worked great and saved wear and tear on the Marmot's. This year I'm thinking about a mitten for those bitter cold VT days, -10f and windy. Any recommendations?
post #12 of 27
Marmot Ultimate Ski Glove. Bulky, but tough and will withstand pretty much anything you want to throw at them. They definitely live up to their name.

I find them a little too bulky for day to day use, so I save them for heavy precipitation days, or when it's extra cold. Rest of the time I have a pair of Auclair leather gloves - not great, but I can get them through the CSIA cheaply enough that replacing them often isn't a huge deal. I'd really like to try some Hestra leather gloves, they look very nice, but also rather pricey.
post #13 of 27
Reusch makes exceptional gloves.
post #14 of 27
I avoid gloves with leather in them. I was over leather gloves 30 years ago when Gates came out with gore-tex gloves that featured tuff-grip palms. Synthetic palms are grippier and drier. My best gloves are from Marmot.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
I can't believe that I'm going into my 32nd ski season and I'm still nervous in anticipation of the coming season. I hope we have a better winter in WV this year. Skiing really didin't get decent until the end of January last year.

Well, I digress, Since the skiing in WV is generally not that challenging for me I went into snowboarding. I bought some Burton gloves! These are the most excellent gloves. I wear them for skiing now also. I was wondering what ski specific gloves people here are using. I would like to get some nice ski gloves for this year. I would prefer to stay away from leather because of the high maintenance.
burton gloves are great, in fact I recommend them to tons of people.

Snowboarding gear in general is better built than ski stuff.
post #16 of 27
Marker Spring gloves. My hands always stay warm and dry, they don't sweat and I get a good flexible grip on my poles.
post #17 of 27
I get hot and swety and my hands and feet are seldom cold.

Others in my family get cold all over and their hands and feet are the most uncomfortable part of their cold body.

How much can gloves really help? Don't your hands and feet get cold becuase you body gets cold?
post #18 of 27
Cold escapes the body through it's extremities first. That's why keeping your head, hands and feet warm, and the rest will be warm too.

Actually, more heat escapes through the head than anywhere else.

I find that on cold days, if you ski moguls and trees most of the time, you work a little harder which keeps you warm.
post #19 of 27
I got my fingers frostbit skiing in Yellowstone a long time ago, it seems like now it take a good two hours for my hands to warm up. I've got a pair of Hestra leather mits - they have the separate trigger finger and are leather with no Gore Tex. I think I got 'em for about $90. They work great. You've gotta smear some Sno Seal on 'em once a month or so, but that's it. I've also got some BD Patrol gloves I wear on not so cold days and some Husquevarna gloves I got for free when I bought a saw.

I used to have a pair of Marmot Ultimate Ski gloves and they were probably the worst gloves I've ever owned. They cost a fortune, they fell apart after about 3 months and the Gore Tex liner did absolutely nothing. Since then I've come to the conclusion that super expensive Gore Tex gloves are pretty much worthless.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
Marker Spring gloves. My hands always stay warm and dry, they don't sweat and I get a good flexible grip on my poles.
Most will prefer a warmer glove for cold days, but spring gloves are nice for milder days. Gloves that make your hands sweat are prone to get very smelly.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
Lloyd, what model are these? Nice gloves.

I think they are called the "Zero G" I couldn't find them on Cloudveils site so they may not make them anymore. They were all over the internet for sale when I searched for the pic.

I would caution you on buying them for the East Coast. They do not perform that well in wet conditions. The are fine in cold just not wet/cold know what I mean?
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Most will prefer a warmer glove for cold days, but spring gloves are nice for milder days. Gloves that make your hands sweat are prone to get very smelly.
Ya, I started wearing Spring gloves all the time when I started on Patrol. They made it easier to write, clip and work without taking your gloves off. Not only that but at $39 you can buy three pairs for the price of one pair of Hestra gloves. All the work you do on Patrol, it didn't make sense to trash expensive gloves that weren't any warmer or drier to begin with.
post #23 of 27
Interesting, at work (bike messenger) I use fingerless gloves whenever possible for similar reasons, writing, typing on Blackberry. My hands get conditioned to cold and they never get cold on the slopes. For skiing, I use the Marmots when it's cold or snowing, but prefer a liner/shell combo for typical mid-Atlantic conditions. I can use the liners or shells alone when it warms up.

My Outdoor Research Windstopper gloves with tuff-grip palms and pre-curved fingers work well with or without shell gloves.

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/st...berId=12500226
post #24 of 27
I have two pairs of Hestras that I wear during the winter and a pair of leather work gloves that I wear during the spring.

That being said, I would not recommend Hestras for snowboarding.
post #25 of 27
I have been using the Leve X Tiger for a few years now and I am very impressed with them. Also have a pair of the Level sixties that are pretty sweet as well
post #26 of 27
I've been using Marmot and Black Diamond recently. Warm, durable, and they fit me well.
post #27 of 27
At this point, most of my skiing is done in the Head cheapies from Costco (usually about $14 or 15, with a sale of $11 or $12 early in the season), or one of my old pairs of Reuschs or Marmots. This year, I may finally get out my PM Gear KevGloves for patrolling.
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