New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Sports Camera Recommendation

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Any recommendations for a sports camera? Prefer a smaller digital type with some type of waterproofness and impact resistance.
post #2 of 25
Me too, would like a high definition, small one.
post #3 of 25
Hey Zoo guys... check out this thread.
post #4 of 25
Have you checked out the Casio Exilim 770?
It may be the thinnest camera available - less than 3/4" thick.
I bought the previous 6 meg version and I've been happy with it.
A friend bought one for his young daughter and says that it has withstood more than it's share of abuse and still works well.
FWIW, I don't use the video mode so I can't comment there.
post #5 of 25
Pentax makes a waterproof digital camera that I've heard is pretty good.

It's called the Pentax Optio W30. 7.1 megapixels, and waterproof to 10 feet, so that should be plenty good for snow.
post #6 of 25
By small I am presumming you mean a point and shoot digital - something that will fit in a pocket. Unfortunatley sports photography which you mentioned is not the strong point of the point and shoot category simply due to the slower and shorter over all lenses. Kind of like the short sleeve dress shirt. Nothing will top a DSLR with fast long lens for action sports images nor will they match the cost either. However, the point and shoots recommended on the link on the earlier discussion are all OK cameras. There are some small DSLR's now as the evolution continues and many have strong builds and will take abuse.

I recently purchased the newer Canon SD900, a 10 MP digital the size of a credit card and 3/4" thick. It will carry it in a cell phone case for quick access leaving my hands free. I'll take it along only when I will need both hands free or weight is an issue like backpacking, some hiking, and when a covert type of approach is prefered. The greater resolution will help offset some other image shortfalls as in cropping for closer shots and enlargements.

Look at major brands in the 6-7MP and more depending on your budget. Though they are marketed for ease of use for the majority, pay attention the the speed of the lens and focal length of the zoom (optical focal lenght not digital). This are usually designated in 35mm equivelents for comparison purposes and can help you parse through ones you like. If you want to shoot many images per second like someone coming through a gate or doing an areal look for this feature also. Point and shoots vary greatly in this aspect and then buy fast memory cards.

Many point and shoots have a inexpensive plastic case that can be placed around the camera for waterproofing and some even up to one atmosphere (about 33') for diving. Overkill if you are thinking about predominantly using it on the slopes and it will add a bit to the bulk. A sandwich bag actually works OK for this or a clear disposable shower cap rolled up in a rubber band and pulled out when needed works.

As for indestructabilty (don't recall your word), very few survive a bounce of a hard floor. The LCD on the back of most newer models is now 2.5" and a big target. Luck and a fast set of hands when the thing falls will help more than camera choice here.

Also, that LCD is a good feature as many use it to compose. Larger is definately better. However, direct sun can make them useless and fade the image completely. Haivng a viewfinder however simple is a good feature. You can apply a small strip of protective plastic that many use on their PDA's to keep the LCD from scratches that will just happen from placing it in pockets and past zippers over time.

Hope I have pointed out some things to ponder as you look and did not babble to far past your requirments.

Tom
post #7 of 25
I also suggest you look at the Canon sd900. Beside the 10 meg stills, if you use the "high res" video setting, you get great video that can be blown up a long way without getting fuzzy.

I put a "MOUNTAINSMITH Cyber II Camera Case" from EMS on one of my backpack's straps, and rigged up a strap between the case and the camera to keep it from falling if I drop it.

I end up with a great camera that I can access instantly, but is protected from the elements in it's case, and rom falling off a lift.
post #8 of 25
What a great resource epic ski is. I have a question do a search and voila there is a thread on the subject!

Tbarb-it sounds like you seriously know what you're talking about. But I'm the non-technical guy trying to figure out which camera to get. One of my pet peaves is the time between when I press the button and when the picture is actually taken. Is that what you are talking about when you mention "a slower lense"?


The Pentax Optio W30 sounds interesting because it would be protected from the moisture involved in skiing.
post #9 of 25
Well, the good thing about modern cameras and especially point and shoots is that they are pretty easy to use and you can get into technicals as far as you want to or not. "Point and shoot" means pretty much just that.

My only recomendation would be to stick with a major brand so things are non proprietary and interface easily with computers. I am unfamiliar with the Pentex camera you mention however it is a respected name and weather they make it or just control the specs and branding it is a respected name.

What you are talking about with the delay in pressing the shutter and the camera actually taking the picture is called "shutter lag" and yes it is a pain especially when shooting any action like that of skiing. Actually it can fool your people subjects too if it is real bad if they see or hear you press the shutter and they are done smiling by the time the camera actually takes the image. Generally a better camera will have less of this lag, or said another way most cameras that exell in this feature are better cameras.

A slower lens refers to how far the aperture will open. To make this point quick as this can be a deeep subject with several ramifications; you want the camera that will have the widest aperture (opens up the most to let the most light in). Look for thei number in all camera specs as it is important. The lower the number the wider it can go so don't get faked out. The wider the lens will go will allow for better or even possible images in darker surroundings as a wider lens (what I meant as faster) lets more light in. Another aspect of wider lenses is in portraits that show a soft out of focus behind a subject (called Bokeh). Harder to get with a point and shoot but possible.

Like all equipment the more features you want the more the $. So it helps if for example you know this camera will always be taking pictures on the slopes during the day in sunlight and indoors where their will also be plenty of light; then a fast lens ( a big price determiner) is not needed. (Flashes on many of these are only usefull as extra fill in light.

I hope this was of some help and not more confusion.
Tom
--------------
[quote=couloir8;786732]What a great resource epic ski is. I have a question do a search and voila there is a thread on the subject!

Tbarb-it sounds like you seriously know what you're talking about. But I'm the non-technical guy trying to figure out which camera to get. One of my pet peaves is the time between when I press the button and when the picture is actually taken. Is that what you are talking about when you mention "a slower lense"? quote]
post #10 of 25
Two things I've found to be showstoppers for ski shots are 1) no optical viewfinder and 2) bad shutter lag.

If the current optio is anything like the older waterproof optio it will suffer from both problems. No optical viewfinder equals guessing where you are shooting way too much of the time - just try using that LCD in full sun on snow, or in flat light conditions. Similarly, shutter lag means you need to guess where your shot is going to be - all the time. Even if much of the lag is autofocus speed, the result is the same. Yeah you can advance focus, blah, blah, blah - you still lose a ton of shots when you are in a hurry.

And better than 2 fps rapid fire won't hurt.

Among most folks I know, the consensus seems to be that in general in the realm of P&S, the Canon IS cameras (depending on your preferences) represent the best picks for ski pics.
post #11 of 25
I used a Canon A630 last year its a 8.0 megapixel P&S and I had pretty good success with tkaing action shots last year. but it will never be as good as DSLR the sensor in any P&S is just too small.

It took ok shots but they are allways 'noisy" a DSLR will solve that




those were both taken with that camera.

I really want a Rebel XTI this year.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
but it will never be as good as DSLR the sensor in any P&S is just too small.
I agree, but I'm not sure that I'd feel safe carrying my dSLR while skiing.
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
I thought this thread was dead.

Well, I'll explain why I'd like some water and impact resistance ina camera. I've (had) two destroyed. I broke a pretty expensive Pentax when it flipped out the top of my backpack. It basically blew apart when it hit the ground. Another, a Canon was dropped in a shallow river for about 2 seconds. (by my friends) We were taking pictures bombing 40-50 feet off a rope swing.

I thought man this is stupid dropping all this cash on cameras, just to have them destroyed by a relatively minor accident.

Now I have been borrowing my wifes camera, which I bought her for a gift. I think I better get my own before I destroy it also.

anyone try this one?

http://www.samsclub.com/shopping/nav...170&pCatg=5753
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick29 View Post
I agree, but I'm not sure that I'd feel safe carrying my dSLR while skiing.
get a warranty that wil cover anything on it, and keep it in a padded backpack.

I am going to carry one when I get it.
post #15 of 25
I bought a canon g6 a few years ago, which takes great pics.
My brother owns the Kodak easy share, as recommended by trekchick, also takes great pics. Both of these are a little larger than some of the point & shoots that fit into the pocket though.

For my daughter, I purchased the canon A640 (10 mp) which I like even better. I highly recommend looking at this one.

Stay away from the Sony Cyber shots.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by rayl1964 View Post
I bought a canon g6 a few years ago, which takes great pics.
My brother owns the Kodak easy share, as recommended by trekchick, also takes great pics. Both of these are a little larger than some of the point & shoots that fit into the pocket though.

For my daughter, I purchased the canon A640 (10 mp) which I like even better. I highly recommend looking at this one.

Stay away from the Sony Cyber shots.
that is newest verison of my A630 one of the better P&s out there.
post #17 of 25
I've used several of the Canon Powershot line, they hold up fairly well and have great optics. But that said, you've got to be realistic:

1) NO digital ever made is going to hold up to conditions of impact, cold and moisture as well as a film camera. Or to take it all the way, to a Leica or old N-1 or F-1 or other entirely mechanical camera. Which you can still find, and just have the film scanned. A used Olympus SLR is especially compact and extremely rugged.

2) The resolution on a 35 mm is equivalent to that of a 22 MP chip, and film doesn't have built-in issues of noise. All point and shoot digitals have issues with noise; comes with the size of the chip.

3) If you really want a digital that's designed for the best they can do in adverse conditions, you're going to pay major bucks for a DSLR designed to be used underwater or by pros.

4) I'd actually go the other way, and buy a cheap 5 MP point and shoot, figure it will die in a season and you'll get a new one. Cameras are now disposable...
post #18 of 25
I have the older Pentax Optio "Water Resistant" camera, which has a lot of very good points and one bad one.
Even though officially only resistant, this summer mine was submerged one or two feet for several minutes with no leakage. The current model is "water proof."
It takes good pictures, 3x optical zoom, and has an optical viewfinder. I like the size and square shape. Shutter lag is not perfect, but no worse than my larger, more expensive home camera.

I keep it in a case attatched to the front strap of pack, with the camera cord around my neck --instant accessibility with no worries about dropping it. Before I worked out this system, I could rarely get far enough ahead of my group to get the camera ready.

The one bad thing is that does not use the optical zoom in video mode. If the current model has fixed that bug, I'd recommend it whole-heartedly. (Although I don't like the new, non-square shape as well as the older model.)
post #19 of 25
A slower lens refers to how far the aperture will open. To make this point quick as this can be a deep subject with several ramifications; you want the camera that will have the widest aperture (opens up the most to let the most light in). Look for theis number in all camera specs that you look at as it is important. The lower the number the wider it can go so don't get faked out. The wider the lens will go will allow for better or even possible images in darker surroundings as a wider lens (what I meant as faster) lets more light in.
---------------

I should have not glossed over the point I made about fast (wider) lenses as it is very significant in shooting any action. And that is that the wider the aperture will go, the more light it will let in - which means teh shorter the shutter has to stay open. The relevance of this is that the faster you take the picture the less blurr you get or not. Action or sports pohotgraphy is about capturing action mostly, and beyond the creative and accidental "treasures" you usually want to "freeze" the action so your subject is sharp and in focus. You can always tell the phographers along the sidelines at major sports events have fast lenses - not because they are long though they certainly are, but because the are huge in a "round sense". This means they are fast and have spertures usually in teh 2.8 range. Those lenses can gather enough light in a moment if time to get a sharp image of a pro athlete mid stride.
Now, I don't recommend carrying such a lens while skiing, but the concept is the same. Faster is better. Shutter lag and other features to support a faster lens generally get better as you go up the price chain. Faster lenses are generally sharper as well with higher quality. But I must say this is a "trend" and I am sure you can find a point and shoot that cost alot, has a sharp fast lens. but has terrible shutter lag.

Last tip. When you shop a good camera store will let you shoot it. (Digital film is pretty cheap huh). So shoot any moving object in the store or cars going down the nearby road/parking lot and just be aware of the shutter lag in different cameras; them look at the image in the LCD for sharoness/blurriness. Of course pan (move with your subject as you take aim) when you need to or they will all be blurry.

Good luck.
Take alot...alot...alot of images. It's the only way to get good. And you get lucky more often too!
post #20 of 25
One way I adjust for the "shutter lag" is to set mine for rapid fire shooting, just turn off the screen display after each shot, set the SIZE of the picture down a bit so it's not writing as much data as for maybe a scenic picture, zoom in on the racer (my normal subject), pre-focus a bit on something about maybe 20 feet above where you really want the picture and just start firing as the racer comes into view. I've gotten great race sequences out of this and can pick from about seven shots. My cameras at least seem to grab the subject and autofocus on the subject as it moves across the shooting area, I don't know how.

I've also experimented with capturing still frames from videos taken with the camera with results that weren't quite as good since the frames were only 640 by 480.
post #21 of 25
Take a look at the Olympus, Stylus 790SW.
Rugged? My sales guy dropped his demo unit onto the floor from 5 feet and it still worked. It's water proof to 10 feet. It will take video with sound. It's got image stabilization. I could clearly see the LCD outside in mid day sun with polarized glasses on. 7.1 megapixel and AF zoom.

I was looking for a pocket camera to take pictures of students that I could then email to them and add value/memories to their lesson experience. This has features that greatly add to it's utility, way beyond my original objective.
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by KAZOOSKI View Post
Take a look at the Olympus, Stylus 790SW.
Rugged? My sales guy dropped his demo unit onto the floor from 5 feet and it still worked. It's water proof to 10 feet. It will take video with sound. It's got image stabilization. I could clearly see the LCD outside in mid day sun with polarized glasses on. 7.1 megapixel and AF zoom.

I was looking for a pocket camera to take pictures of students that I could then email to them and add value/memories to their lesson experience. This has features that greatly add to it's utility, way beyond my original objective.
How did the Stylus 790SW work out for you on the slopes?

I've been looking at the Olympus 1030 SW
http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_se...p?product=1363

I'd like something that's compact, easy to use, and rugged enough to use skiing, backpacking, climbing , canoeing, fishing, the beach, etc. The 1030 SW is billed as waterproof to 33 feet, freeze proof to 14 degrees F, able to withstand a 6.6 foot drop, and able to withstand 220 lbs of pressure.

Amazon has it for $326, which is still a bit pricey for a point and shoot. I'm thinking I might bite when it drops below $300.

Anyone have any thoughts on this camera? Any other reasonably priced cameras out there designed to withstand the elements?
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DropKickMurphy View Post
How did the Stylus 790SW work out for you on the slopes?

I've been looking at the Olympus 1030 SW
http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_se...p?product=1363

I'd like something that's compact, easy to use, and rugged enough to use skiing, backpacking, climbing , canoeing, fishing, the beach, etc. The 1030 SW is billed as waterproof to 33 feet, freeze proof to 14 degrees F, able to withstand a 6.6 foot drop, and able to withstand 220 lbs of pressure.

Amazon has it for $326, which is still a bit pricey for a point and shoot. I'm thinking I might bite when it drops below $300.

Anyone have any thoughts on this camera? Any other reasonably priced cameras out there designed to withstand the elements?
Personally I would buy the 850SW for $234 plus free ship from Amazon.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...&s=electronics

If you won't be taking underwater shots and you want to save a few more bucks the water resistant version will work fine. That is the one I have. The 820 is $174 shipped http://www.amazon.com/Olympus-Stylus...64974&sr =1-5
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post
Personally I would buy the 850SW for $234 plus free ship from Amazon.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...&s=electronics

If you won't be taking underwater shots and you want to save a few more bucks the water resistant version will work fine. That is the one I have. The 820 is $174 shipped http://www.amazon.com/Olympus-Stylus...64974&sr =1-5
I wish canon made a P&s like that...

Canon P&S are by far the best I have used, IMO the super quick adjustability of the canons makes them golden.
post #25 of 25
This is a good SLR

K200DAffordable, yet technologically advanced
The PENTAX K200D, perfect for developing digital SLR users, offers an easy-to-use interface and incorporates award winning PENTAX imaging technology. With 10.2 megapixels, this DSLR features many of the advancements that are incorporated in the PENTAX K20D, including a 2.7 inch LCD monitor, Custom Image functions for perfect control over how images are developed, and the Expanded Dynamic Range function. Compatible with any PENTAX lens ever produced and featuring Shake Reduction, the PENTAX K200D offers a high quality image sensor with the sophisticated PRIME (PENTAX Real Image Engine), a user-friendly Dust Removal system including the new Dust Alert feature, 11-point SAFOX VIII auto focus system, sophisticated 16-segment multi-pattern metering and auto sensitivity control up to ISO 1600, all in a weather and dust resistant body.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: