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Top Five Bindings Of The Last 25 Years - Page 2

post #31 of 58

All the Salomons with width adjustable toe wings.....SUCKED!!!!

 

the wings  would not stay adjusted properly!

post #32 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

All the Salomons with width adjustable toe wings.....SUCKED!!!!

 

the wings  would not stay adjusted properly!


I had a pair of 900 series on some pilots that rattled loose.  They had ONE adjustment screw going across for BOTH sides.  I have plenty of other sets of metal 800 and 900 series with TWO wing adjustments, one on each side.  Those stay put just fine, but the earlier version did suck just like you say there.

post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 


I had a pair of 900 series on some pilots that rattled loose.  They had ONE adjustment screw going across for BOTH sides.  I have plenty of other sets of metal 800 and 900 series with TWO wing adjustments, one on each side.  Those stay put just fine, but the earlier version did suck just like you say there.

Damn....We agreed on something and the world didn't end!:ROTF

 

 

I liked the Tyrolia Freeflex Series...17

 

and Mojo 15's for on the deck, no lifter. 

 

But I must admit all of our Atomic Neox have been stellar.

 

But maybe the best of all is the Atomic 10.18!   BULLETPROOF, Highly adjustable!  We have a few pair that are between 13 & a couple of pair 16 years old and still in service on our speed skis!

post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

Damn....We agreed on something and the world didn't end!ROTF.gif


I liked the Tyrolia Freeflex Series...17

and Mojo 15's for on the deck, no lifter. 

But I must admit all of our Atomic Neox have been stellar.

But maybe the best of all is the Atomic 10.18!   BULLETPROOF, Highly adjustable!  We have a few pair that are between 13 & a couple of pair 16 years old and still in service on our speed skis!

Just curious when you don't like Solomon bindings, aren't newer atomic and Solomon bindings the same? tongue.gif
post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowsgomooh View Post

Just curious when you don't like Solomon bindings, aren't newer atomic and Solomon bindings the same? tongue.gif
Not what he said. He was referring to one particular type of Salomon binding, not all Salomon bindings. I happen to not like Marker heels in the Royal Family but I like their performance and race bindings quite a bit.
post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Not what he said. He was referring to one particular type of Salomon binding, not all Salomon bindings. I happen to not like Marker heels in the Royal Family but I like their performance and race bindings quite a bit.

True, was just joking actually, but a bad joke I guess..... smile.gif
post #37 of 58

Older than 25 yrs, but have to include the Look "Nevada"--that's what all the Cool Kids had when I was in School.

post #38 of 58
I've almost exclusively skied on Salomon bindings, and I've never had issues with toe wings. I understand that some people have problems with them. I feel that the problem stems from toes being over-tightened and threads becoming stripped.

In the 30-40 pairs of 997/DR9/900/914/916STH16 that I've owned, none have had toe wing problems.
post #39 of 58

I LOVE to hear people reminiscing about Spademans. I was pretty familiar with them back in their day, as I spent four winters working as a PSIA certified ski instructor for two ski areas that used Spademan bindings in their rental programs. They were novel back in their day for that specific application as any boot fit right into any ski, without adjusting the bindings for boot sole length. They were generally useful for novice to intermediate skiers with the following limitations:

  • Skis were frequently falling off students, which was a hassle for me as I was alway helping students put them back on. I recall that the snow got into the plate interface and messed it up, or it was an improper adjustment issue.
  • There wasn't a standard DIN adjustment visible by looking at the binding, just a spring that was tightened/loosened. Often it was set too loose requiring return trips to the rental shop for tightening. Other people were injured because they were too tight and didn't release (too late to go back to the shop and make them looser, as they were done for at least the day). Release calibration was at best suspect.
  • People just walking around the lodge in their ski boots fell down on the stairs and other hard surfaces, and were injured, because the huge metal plate mounted on the center of the boot sole was slippery.
  • Some boots couldn't accept the sole plate properly, and the sole plate(s) pulled off the boots. There was a serious compatibility issue with boots.
  • Good skiers that tried to use them sometimes ripped the binding right off the ski, much more so than with other bindings of that era. There was a serious compatibility issue with skis.


So then, Spademans generally didn't stay on when they should have, and frequently didn't come off when they should have, and too often ripped right off the boot or the ski - and amazingly some people think that Spademans are a good and timely binding solution? Back then all bindings were pretty unreliable, and so were Spademans, but in my opinion no bindings from that era can reasonably be compared to modern bindings. I personally think that Spademans were one of the crappiest bindings out there back then, but then who knows since I prefer KneeBindings today as I have skied 416 ski days on them so far without a single pre-release over the past 7 seasons.

post #40 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

I've almost exclusively skied on Salomon bindings, and I've never had issues with toe wings. I understand that some people have problems with them. I feel that the problem stems from toes being over-tightened and threads becoming stripped.

In the 30-40 pairs of 997/DR9/900/914/916STH16 that I've owned, none have had toe wing problems.


I have had many pre-releases out of Salomon toes because the toe wings got loose and without tightening them down at the end of EVERY single ski-day, I would then pre-release the next day due to the slop that developed the day before. They were only acceptable if you tightened down the toe wing adjustments every night you skied them.

post #41 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

I've almost exclusively skied on Salomon bindings, and I've never had issues with toe wings. I understand that some people have problems with them. I feel that the problem stems from toes being over-tightened and threads becoming stripped.

In the 30-40 pairs of 997/DR9/900/914/916STH16 that I've owned, none have had toe wing problems.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

I've almost exclusively skied on Salomon bindings, and I've never had issues with toe wings. I understand that some people have problems with them. I feel that the problem stems from toes being over-tightened and threads becoming stripped.

In the 30-40 pairs of 997/DR9/900/914/916STH16 that I've owned, none have had toe wing problems.


I have had many pre-releases out of Salomon toes because the toe wings got loose and without tightening them down at the end of EVERY single ski-day, I would then pre-release the next day due to the slop that developed the day before. They were only acceptable if you tightened down the toe wing adjustments every night you skied them.

I agree with Caucasian, rarely ever had a problem with wing adjustment more than once a year at most. I would have as much trust in a non indemnified 957E to 997E as ANY new binding on the market. 

post #42 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

I've almost exclusively skied on Salomon bindings, and I've never had issues with toe wings. I understand that some people have problems with them. I feel that the problem stems from toes being over-tightened and threads becoming stripped.

In the 30-40 pairs of 997/DR9/900/914/916STH16 that I've owned, none have had toe wing problems.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

I've almost exclusively skied on Salomon bindings, and I've never had issues with toe wings. I understand that some people have problems with them. I feel that the problem stems from toes being over-tightened and threads becoming stripped.

In the 30-40 pairs of 997/DR9/900/914/916STH16 that I've owned, none have had toe wing problems.


I have had many pre-releases out of Salomon toes because the toe wings got loose and without tightening them down at the end of EVERY single ski-day, I would then pre-release the next day due to the slop that developed the day before. They were only acceptable if you tightened down the toe wing adjustments every night you skied them.

I agree with Caucasian, rarely ever had a problem with wing adjustment more than once a year at most. I would have as much trust in a non indemnified 957E to 997E as ANY new binding on the market. 


What explains the difference, Loctite?

post #43 of 58
Some people kick their boots into their bindings, I step into them. I also don't overtighten my toes.

I've never had issues with wing AFDs breaking either.
post #44 of 58

:worthless

Just sayin'

 

I had Burt envy back in the day. Burts with Scott boots would have been pretty sweet. I had to settle for Hanson Avantis and Solly 727's

post #45 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

All the Salomons with width adjustable toe wings.....SUCKED!!!!

 

the wings  would not stay adjusted properly!


Yeah, I had some 897 composites which were a mess from the get go.  The toe wings had one adjusting screw which you never could properly get the toe secured, always sloppy ( a real confidence builder!}  And the plastic structure of the heels  pretty much disintegrated on me after a while.  I ended up switching out the things with some other Salomons.  

 

I had some Rossi Power 100 that I really liked.  I'm thinking Rossi combined the Look heel with the Geze toe which seemed to work great.  The problem with the older Look toes was that you could twist out of the toe in heavy crud, like what you can see in The PNW.

post #46 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


What explains the difference, Loctite?

 

Phil said RARELY....I don't think it is EVER acceptable for any part of any binding to inadvertently go out of adjustment. 

 

I don't think it had anything to do with over tightening . And why should you have to adjust the toe wings to your boot toe.  99.9 % of bindigs don't hav ew this ridiculous adjustment and are self adjusting for toe height and width. 

 

Just a crappy design. 

 

 

I have skied Marker, Atomic and Tyrolia for many years , all with NO issues.   But then again....I just don't ever release inadvertently.   Some seem to  folks fly out of whatever they ski in. 

 

At least Partially a technique issue. 


Edited by Atomicman - 5/2/15 at 5:47pm
post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

Some people kick their boots into their bindings, I step into them. I also don't overtighten my toes.

I've never had issues with wing AFDs breaking either.


This is significant IMO. Yeah, I know we're way too cool, and in way too much of a hurry, to actually tap/scrape off snow with a pole, and then step into a binding. And for some reason that makes sense at 6, race kids learn to scrape off snow with their toe pieces. So it must be the best way, right?

 

But I watch full sized adults kick the snow off their soles hard using that toe piece, or jam their boots in using the heel to scrap off loose snow, and I wonder if the binding designers factored in something like hitting the binding repeatedly with a 2x4 as a test.

 

I've had nothing but bad luck with Salomon bindings over the years, don't think every model is bad, fully understand that others worship them, just don't use them myself anymore, so not on my list. YMMV. Not enough of a connoisseur to keep track of precise year to year differences or model numbers; would vote for Look FKS's from middle 2000's at top of the list, then Tyrolia Free-Flexes that had the diagonal heel, then Mojo 14 FD's, then current Look FKS 14's, then (gasp) Marker MRR's from near the end of their run. Themes: Elasticity (all), ability of heel to move (all), toe moving in multiple dimensions (all), ability to get on in adverse conditions using hands (some). 


Edited by beyond - 5/2/15 at 12:58pm
post #48 of 58
1.Tyrolia FF X20/18(with delrin/teflon AFD plate and Diagonal heel)
2.Look/Rossi FKS
3.Ess v.a.r./Atomic Race 1018
4.Marker MRR
post #49 of 58
Line Binding. What happened?
Quote:
This binding system will prove itself over time as the new standard for what bindings of the future will be measured against. It's a binding that thinks differently, works differently and most importantly performs differently than any other binding in the world. We have the technology.
http://www.skis.com/Line-Reactor-12-Ski-Bindings/55309P,default,pd.html

reactor10.jpg
post #50 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


What explains the difference, Loctite?


Maybe, or maybe also the specific binding model. I don't actually remember the binding model number but the last Salomon bindings I regularly skied were called the "Pilot System", and came on a set of Salomon XScreams. They were the ones that had a toe wing adjustment screw that used to loosen up, and just before I traded them away they were loosening up quite frequently. In retrospect I probably should have used Loctite, but never did - and just re-tightened them when I was going over the edges each night. It unfortunately took me a number of pre-releases to figure out that it was the toe wing adjustment that was loosening up. By that point I had other skis I liked better. I did warn the new owner to watch that adjustment carefully. BTW, I don't beat on my bindings to get the snow off my boot soles - and mostly use my ski poles for that task, with a sharp whack to the side of the boot soles.

post #51 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Line Binding. What happened?
Quote:
This binding system will prove itself over time as the new standard for what bindings of the future will be measured against. It's a binding that thinks differently, works differently and most importantly performs differently than any other binding in the world. We have the technology.
http://www.skis.com/Line-Reactor-12-Ski-Bindings/55309P,default,pd.html

reactor10.jpg

I have a pair in my collection. Heavy and they appear to be somewhat inefficient. I wouldn't ski them. 

post #52 of 58
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post


Maybe, or maybe also the specific binding model. I don't actually remember the binding model number but the last Salomon bindings I regularly skied were called the "Pilot System", and came on a set of Salomon XScreams. They were the ones that had a toe wing adjustment screw that used to loosen up, and just before I traded them away they were loosening up quite frequently. In retrospect I probably should have used Loctite, but never did - and just re-tightened them when I was going over the edges each night. It unfortunately took me a number of pre-releases to figure out that it was the toe wing adjustment that was loosening up. By that point I had other skis I liked better. I did warn the new owner to watch that adjustment carefully. BTW, I don't beat on my bindings to get the snow off my boot soles - and mostly use my ski poles for that task, with a sharp whack to the side of the boot soles.

Some of the Scream Pilot bindings were identical to 810/912/914s, and mounted to a plate that was mounted through the sidewall of the ski. The 1st gen Pilot was its own binding, based on the 810/912/914, but the baseplate mounted through the sidewall of the ski.

They all had the single toe wing adjustment, as well as toe height.

The nice thing about the dual wing adjustment is that if your boot has had it's toebox punched out(like mine), you can still adjust them so that your boot sits in the middle of the binding, not duck/pigeon toed. And I can wear boots with Vibram soles.

Oh, and Atomicman:
clamps.jpg
Atomic made some good bindings
post #53 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post


Maybe, or maybe also the specific binding model. I don't actually remember the binding model number but the last Salomon bindings I regularly skied were called the "Pilot System", and came on a set of Salomon XScreams. They were the ones that had a toe wing adjustment screw that used to loosen up, and just before I traded them away they were loosening up quite frequently. In retrospect I probably should have used Loctite, but never did - and just re-tightened them when I was going over the edges each night. It unfortunately took me a number of pre-releases to figure out that it was the toe wing adjustment that was loosening up. By that point I had other skis I liked better. I did warn the new owner to watch that adjustment carefully. BTW, I don't beat on my bindings to get the snow off my boot soles - and mostly use my ski poles for that task, with a sharp whack to the side of the boot soles.

Some of the Scream Pilot bindings were identical to 810/912/914s, and mounted to a plate that was mounted through the sidewall of the ski. The 1st gen Pilot was its own binding, based on the 810/912/914, but the baseplate mounted through the sidewall of the ski.

They all had the single toe wing adjustment, as well as toe height.

The nice thing about the dual wing adjustment is that if your boot has had it's toebox punched out(like mine), you can still adjust them so that your boot sits in the middle of the binding, not duck/pigeon toed. And I can wear boots with Vibram soles.

Oh, and Atomicman:
clamps.jpg
Atomic made some good bindings

A) The independent wing also helps if you want an abducted stance.  

 

B) Yes, the toe height can help accommodating a Vibram sole but unless you have a sliding AFD, you might not get a clean release. 

post #54 of 58

Anyone have a pic of the Atomic-branded FKS?

post #55 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Anyone have a pic of the Atomic-branded FKS?

No such thing. 

post #56 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Anyone have a pic of the Atomic-branded FKS?

No such thing. 

 

There -was- an Atomic logo turntable; denver wholesale even had them on ebay for a while

post #57 of 58

Spademan Bindings-very innovative at the time and designed by an orthopedic surgeon.

post #58 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Anyone have a pic of the Atomic-branded FKS?

No such thing. 

 

There -was- an Atomic logo turntable; denver wholesale even had them on ebay for a while

As far as I know, Look/Rossi never has a branding relationship with Atomic. Pic's or it never happened. 

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