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Japan, no helmets

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Looking at those pics posted of Japan, it was pretty shocking to see a bunch of guys and not a single one was wearing a helmet.

Noooooooooooooooooo, this is not another helmet/no helmet rant.

Just here in the US we are so helmet oriented (pun intended), are we the only ones?

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post #2 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Looking at those pics posted of Japan, it was pretty shocking to see a bunch of guys and not a single one was wearing a helmet.

Noooooooooooooooooo, this is not another helmet/no helmet rant.

Just here in the (Eastern)US we are so helmet oriented (pun intended), are we the only ones?

:
I messed with your quote.
Helmets are much less prevalent in the West.I would think anywhere a hard surface is mostly skied on there would be such helmet use and in other locales it would be slower for the helmet use to catch on.




Yuki . You know this is summer and another helmet rant is likely.
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 



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post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Helmets are much less prevalent in the West.
While I don't know what the ratio is for eastern helmet use, there are quite a lot of helmets being worn here, and we're about as far west as you can get in the U.S.
post #5 of 27
My personal observation is the opposite. There're more helmet usage in the "west" than in the east. But the "west" I had skied lately was Tahoe.

I think it's the more "cosmopolitan" areas that has the highest helmet use rate. That would be the two coasts. People who ski less tend to have the most gear, IMO. ("O" stands for "observation", not necessarily opinion)

Don't have any idea about Japanese skiing, probably not apply there.
post #6 of 27
Can't post a photo on this thread. But they do wear helmets in Japan, see http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...990#post743990
post #7 of 27
My observation as a broad generalization and with the caveat that I was last in Japan several years ago: Japanese culture tends to be particularly fashion and trend conscious. This is also true of Japanese skiers. If helmets can be marketed as fashion accessories they may catch on.

The average skier in Japan skis pretty well compared to average skiers from many other places. They want to look good skiing as well as fashionable and tend to take more lessons than many others elsewhere.
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
People who ski less tend to have the most gear, IMO.
I find that highly unlikely. I have a lot of gear, including at least 4 helmets. Gratned I only skied 56 days last season, but that was becasue it was cut short by injuries. Fortunately, i may be cleared to start skiing again in another 2 weeks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post
The average skier in Japan skis pretty well compared to average skiers from many other places. They want to look good skiing as well as fashionable and tend to take more lessons than many others elsewhere.
Just in observation of Japanese tourists - they tend to be fairly mediocre and are less likely to ski off-piste.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Helmets are much less prevalent in the West.
As Pouane noted, helmet use is quite high around here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Just here in the US we are so helmet oriented (pun intended), are we the only ones?
In Italy and Switzerland, it is a law that all skiers under 14 wear a helmet. I don't recall about France.
post #9 of 27
Helmets in Japan seem to prefer boarders to skiers; very few helmets I've met were on skiers, they all tell me boarders are much more fun because they tend to go through trees (rather than around them).
That said, lots of Aussie helmets in Japan recently, and for them it's a toss-up.
post #10 of 27
My thinking was that a higher percentage of skiers/riders use helmets regularly in the Eastern areas than the West . Sounds like we need a poll . It would be a bit bent towards the more experienced riders but would still tell us something about helmet wearers
post #11 of 27
#9, I think that the Aussie invasion of Hokkaido is starting to have an impact. On advice from members of my club I got a helmet for my first trip to Niseko. I noticed that nearly all of the Aussies wore helmets and most of the Japanese boarders were wearing them too. The Japanese skiers are starting to venture off-piste as well and my club colleagues who have been to Niseko a few times commented that more of them were wearing helmets this year.

The number of skiers in Australia wearing helmets this season has increased dramatically as well. Now that I've got a helmet, I wear mine all the time when I'm not instructing. I wear it some of the time when I'm instructing but it gets too hot at Friday Flat when the sun is shining to wear it all the time.
post #12 of 27
Japanese or not, people who don't wear helmets are just plain bad people.
post #13 of 27
``The Japanese skiers are starting to venture off-piste as well...''

Rugbyskier: I don't know where you got the idea that skiers in Japan are just now starting to go off-piste, maybe it seems that way to you because mountains here are crowded so you think everyone's on the groomed runs, but it ain't so.
post #14 of 27
Helmet use here in Japan is way behind what I see in NA. Casual riders (boarders or skiers) do not wear them at all and the hard core, even the guys throwing big in the park, are unlikely to wear them either. Westerners and racers make up the majority of helmets, where I ski.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
Japanese or not, people who don't wear helmets are just plain bad people.
Excuse me. Wearing helmet or not is a personal choice. Please do not offend those prefer not to wear helmet.
post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
So are condoms and safe sex.

Our tax dollars are probably supporting the offspring of these ner-do-wells!

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post #17 of 27
I skied in Japan and wore my helmet (the trees off-piste can play havoc with your hair). Lots of others were wearing safety beanies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
....

Our tax dollars are probably supporting the offspring of these ner-do-wells!

:
Since when did US tax dollars support helmetless Japanese skiers :



Yuki, you must be bored. I'm still skiing.
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Jus' a general statement on safe sex and helmets at large.

But now that you mention it, since Japan still relies on a heavy US military presence with China and N. Korea next door, they too, like Israel are on Uncle Sams welfare rolls.

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post #19 of 27
Yuki,

I don't quite get the connection?
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scavenger View Post
Excuse me. Wearing helmet or not is a personal choice. Please do not offend those prefer not to wear helmet.
I think you need to check the batteries in your sarcasm meter.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scavenger View Post
Excuse me. Wearing helmet or not is a personal choice. Please do not offend those prefer not to wear helmet.
Don't mind him his skis blind his vision when the sun is out. I really don't think he offends himself, others I am sure at times like us all .
post #22 of 27

Yuki, I respectly disagree with your conclusions in your post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Jus' a general statement on safe sex and helmets at large.

But now that you mention it, since Japan still relies on a heavy US military presence with China and N. Korea next door, they too, like Israel are on Uncle Sams welfare rolls.

:
Yuki I RESPECTFULLY disagree with your generalized conclusion: "...they too...are on Uncle Sam's welfare rolls." Japan PAYS for the leased land or outright purchase of land, construction, maintanence of ALL bases currently in exclusive U.S. use (many bases in Okinawa or Yokota, among others) or co-use bases (Iwakuni). Sharing many direct costs attributed to existance among others.

Your assumptions are incorrect and please don't misinform the Epicski members on this point. Japan's altered Constitution (1945), amendment #9, forbids it from building up or maintaining an "offensive" military presence, thus the phrase (translated) Japanese Self-Defence Forces vs. Army, Navy, AF, Marines, Special Forces, etc. I am sure Japanese nationals would not be happy with your blanket conclusions.

Subsequently the American Japanese Security Treaty (still in effect) was finalized in the the early sixies in where the bases that so to speak "occupied" a WWII defeated Japan, stipulated that Japan "pay" for these bases in the manner stated above.

Succinctly put, Japan unlike Israel and others as you mention, under this security treaty, RELIES on this treaty, to relaliate the current number rouge or rouge-like anti-Japan regimes in the Far East.

Lastly, Japan's public and public leaders are openly discussing the alteration of #9 amendment, among other post WWII altered (by Allied Forces but marketly led my Gen. McAruther/Pres. Truman's input and the U.S.) amendments, to NOT return to a pre-WWII constitution but an amended one that reflects current geopolitical situation and the near future.
post #23 of 27

Lostboy's got it right...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post
Japanese culture tends to be particularly fashion and trend conscious. This is also true of Japanese skiers. If helmets can be marketed as fashion accessories they may catch on.

The average skier in Japan skis pretty well compared to average skiers from many other places. They want to look good skiing as well as fashionable and tend to take more lessons than many others elsewhere.
Now to chill out, and keep to the topic of discussion...Hahahahaha.
Japanese skiers still believe that helmet usage is for the most part a boarder phenomena.

As we all know besides hitting immovable obstacles like trees, park jumps metal slide (is that what u call them?), a boarder (sitting in the middle of a piste) or fellow skier (at least travelin in a similar speed, direction), etc., the shortness and way new boarders are attached to their boards precipatates abrupt backward falls- especially beginning boarders, thus their popularity. Yes, fashion also plays a big part in the helmet equation in Japan.

Skiers who wear "pots" are relegated to off-piste, big mountain free skier wannabes or racer wannabes (who HAVE to wear them). Mogul skiers don't generally use helmets in Japan either.

I have and wear one of my two pots for a second reason. I prefer to wear very thin and light ski clothing, even on cold course inspection days. By wearing a helmet keeps me warmer than bulking up with layering and membrane (Gore-tex, Entrant, etc.) outerwear.
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
Domo, correction noted.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scavenger View Post
Excuse me. Wearing helmet or not is a personal choice. Please do not offend those prefer not to wear helmet.
Oh come on, everybody knows that helmets are only found on the heads of the truely virtuous, and all others are miscreants, who deserve to be torn apart by wild horses.







This time I'll include this indicator that my over the top and thoroghly ridiculous statement is not serious.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
Oh come on, everybody knows that helmets are only found on the heads of the truely virtuous, and all others are miscreants, who deserve to be torn apart by wild hill frogs..







This time I'll include this indicator that my over the top and thoroughly ridiculous statement is not serious.
Without your permission I altered your post. Yes , miscreant I am.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Without your permission I altered your post. Yes , miscreant I am.
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