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Do You De-tune? - Page 2

Poll Results: So, do you de-tune?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 16% of voters (14)
    Yes, I prefer rounded supple tips and tails
  • 60% of voters (51)
    No, the edgier the better for me. Make mine sharp
  • 9% of voters (8)
    I can go either way depending on my mood.
  • 14% of voters (12)
    This poll is flawed and requires more pictures.
85 Total Votes  
post #31 of 35
As another "old guy"....

I like my Old-school Super G racing skis (Kästle RX National Team) razor sharp tip to tail. The more edge grip the better. The sooner they bite the better. When I want a ski to bite into the hardpack, I want it NOW, and I don't want a half measure. I also like my SGs with the original 1/2 base bevel better than a 1 degree bevel, even though I hear speed skis should be skied with a bigger base bevel. I know I'm going against the grain;most folks want less precision in a speed ski, but it just works better that way for me.

I like my new-fangled shaped Fischer WC SCs razor sharp tip to tail as well. They came with a 1 degree base bevel that I'm thinking of changing to 1/2 too.
post #32 of 35
For carving type skis there is no reason to detune at all unless the tips are feeling hooky in which case it's usually better to adjust the bevel at the tips and tails rather than detuning (dulling). Hooky feeling skis often signal a skier alignment issue that can be addressed though having ski boot soles properly canted. On shorter skis the edges should be sharp along their entire length because there is less edge to work with than on the longer, traditional skis- among other reasons.

Too many ski shops are clueless about tuning any other way than how they always have and how they think the customer wants them. Too many shops are also clueless about recommended bevel differences among different ski brands. So, for example, if you are going to have your new Atomic or Fischer carvers tuned, be sure to specify 1 degree base and 3 degrees side bevels. Otherwise, they are likely to come back with something else, often a 1 and 2 bevel. This might be OK but its not how those manufacturers think their skis work best. At the end of the day bevels are a matter of personal preference. However, the manufacturer's recommendation is usually a good place to begin.

Extreme skiers may detune their tips and tails so as not to risk catching an edge or risk their tails hanging up on lines where "if you fall you will die". They are interested in getting to the bottom in one piece and not carving perfect arcs down a rock strewn narrow chute. In soft snow conditions whether edges are sharp anywhere along their length may make little difference. Mogul skiing purists skiing zipper lines near full time may also find it beneficial to detune. However, on firm snow or ice on piste, detuning defeats the performance built into modern carving skis and doesn't make things better.
post #33 of 35
Good post. All makes sense to me....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post
For carving type skis there is no reason to detune at all unless the tips .... On shorter skis the edges should be sharp along their entire length because there is less edge to work with .... Too many ski shops are clueless ... Extreme skiers may detune their tips and tails so as not to risk catching an edge .... Mogul skiing purists skiing zipper lines near full time may also find it beneficial ... However, on firm snow or ice on piste, detuning defeats the performance built into modern carving skis and doesn't make things better.
post #34 of 35
For almost all my skis, I leave the tune well finished and sharp from back of contact point to front of contact point at the tail. On longer skis I tend to open up the base bevel a bit right in the contact point area, still leaving the edge sharp. Behind the rear contact point, I always aggressively soften the edge till its nice and round. What I do at the tip depends on the ski, but in general I'm likely to soften aggressively skis who don't get a longer effective edge when you roll them up and leave more edge on skis that do have such a sidecut. Though sometimes I've found skis in the latter group that chatter hard at hookup behave better when I soften them a bit more up there.

I think its important to clarify that traditional detuning involves dulling the edge on the "inside" of the contact point, while I'm mostly talking about what I do right at and beyond the contact point. If you tell random shop monkey that you want the "tip and tail" softened, they will probably detune several inches of perfectly good ski. This industry runs on old wives tale and old habits get passed on to new 16 year old shop monkeys who don't know why they exist in the first place.
post #35 of 35
More on the old days: we also flat-filed our bases to a 0-degree bevel. And the tips were farther away (though narrower).
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