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Skis going appart in every turn..

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi..

I think I got a problem when I ski.. When I make a turn my skis seem to go apart from each other and when I finish my turn they go back close to each other..

Sadly I do not have any movie of my problem but maybe you guys know what I mean - I think it might be a common problem..


- Kasper
post #2 of 9
Grook,

Without seeing you ski or knowing what level skier you are, it is a little hard to make a good guess of what the trouble might be.

Does it happen on both right and left turns?
Does it happen while skiing slowely and not when skiing fast?
Does it happen while skiing fast and not slow?
Does it happen all of the time and on all terrain and snow condition?
Does it feel like the outside ski in a turn is sliding out from under you?

Some possible causes are:
A boot allignment problem which needs to be corrected by a qualified boot fitter.
Your technique uses a strong up motion at the turn finish causing the skis to get closer together.
Your technique allows your weight to fall into the inside ski at the middle of the turn.

If you can give more information on your skiing ability and if you are using current equipment, it may help narrow it down to where the problem is. To what extent do the skis go apart and how wide is your normal stance?

RW
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
Grook,

Without seeing you ski or knowing what level skier you are, it is a little hard to make a good guess of what the trouble might be.

Does it happen on both right and left turns?
Does it happen while skiing slowely and not when skiing fast?
Does it happen while skiing fast and not slow?
Does it happen all of the time and on all terrain and snow condition?
Does it feel like the outside ski in a turn is sliding out from under you?

Some possible causes are:
A boot allignment problem which needs to be corrected by a qualified boot fitter.
Your technique uses a strong up motion at the turn finish causing the skis to get closer together.
Your technique allows your weight to fall into the inside ski at the middle of the turn.

If you can give more information on your skiing ability and if you are using current equipment, it may help narrow it down to where the problem is. To what extent do the skis go apart and how wide is your normal stance?

RW


Does it happen on both right and left turns?
- Yes

Does it happen while skiing slowely and not when skiing fast?
- It happens when I skid. It's when I'm done skidding and trying to get into my next turn.. I always ski fast so dunno if it happens when I ski slow..

Does it happen all of the time and on all terrain and snow condition?
- When I skid So in conditions where I can skid and where I skid, it happens..

Does it feel like the outside ski in a turn is sliding out from under you?
- No.. Maybe it feels as if I am not putting enough pressure on my inner ski..



As for my level of skiing - I can ski everything.. I usually ski Atomic GS12 or SL12 - sometimes Fischer RC4.. I got Fischer RC4 Competition boots (130 flexindex)..
post #4 of 9
Grook,

Thanks for the additional information.

Quote:
When I make a turn my skis seem to go apart from each other and when I finish my turn they go back close to each other..
Are you trying to keep your skis close together?

Quote:
It happens when I skid. It's when I'm done skidding and trying to get into my next turn.
Do you ever ski using a clean arc with little skidding?

If the answer to the 2 questions above are yes on the first and no to the second, it sounds to me like toward the end of your skid, your weight falls to the inside ski and that is why your feet come apart to stay balanced. From there, you make your transition into the new turn and can get your feet back together.

RW
post #5 of 9
Just try to do less turning work with your inside ski. It is normal for tracks on the snow to separate a little when you turn. Too much is not good though.
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
I arc superbly.. No problems there.. Why I love arcing a lot However if it is very crowded I have to skid..

When I was little - before carvers came - I drove with my legs 1 inch from each other but now I got them around 12 inches from each other.. I don't know if I try to keep them together - not really I guess..
post #7 of 9
You put too much weight on your inside ski. The result is a stem. This also helps you initiate the next turn so its not that it has no purpose. Thats why you do it, it helps you turn. Your hips rotate towards the outside of the turn causing it. When you carve (arch) you dont have this problem since you are riding along on your edges but its not unusual that even if you think you arch you dont. Its all about your hips being in the wrong place. I could be wrong offcourse. (Take a look at UL skiing in the carving comparisson thread... something like that?)
post #8 of 9
The separation most likely occurs because you're anticipating starting the next turn by putting the weight on the old inside ski early so it's there to make the next turn mostly on the new outside ski.

Try thinking about your initiation as something you do equally with both legs.

Currently you are skidding at the end of a left turn with most weight on your right foot and then moving most weight to your left foot to start the right turn. Keep your weight emphasis on the right foot until you begin your right turn using both feet as your base. Let the weight emphasis shift to the new outside foot after the direction change begins.
post #9 of 9
Another possibility is that you aren't moving your inside hip toward the tip of your inside ski throughout the turn. I've seen this a lot in higher level skiers, where the tips diverge and the tails come close to touching, only to track back toward each other. One reason for this to occur is the upper body starts to tip too much to the inside and the inside leg compensates by turning a bit more to create stability. By continuing to move toward the tip of the ski, better angles are created that allow the inside ski to keep tracking as it was and taking away the need to compensate.
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