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Head Games and Riding

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
This summer has been a summer of advancement in my mountain biking experience. I've been getting over small logs (up to 8 inches), and going on more advanced trails without hesitation. I've also been riding through virgin woods on our property to shake some of my head games. My confidence has raised considerably, and I'm getting a lot more grins out of my riding.

The problem I've had.
The one thing in my head I can't shake.
Logs/log piles, 10" or bigger.
I've approached them with all my tools, and tricks in place, thinking I can do them, then stop short, and walk it over.

What is wrong with me?
Why can't I go this next step?
post #2 of 16
as usual, an unweighting issue.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan View Post
as usual, an unweighting issue.
I lost weight this year, down to, less than 125lbs. how much more unweighting do I need to do?
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
This summer has been a summer of advancement in my mountain biking experience. I've been getting over small logs (up to 8 inches), and going on more advanced trails without hesitation. I've also been riding through virgin woods on our property to shake some of my head games. My confidence has raised considerably, and I'm getting a lot more grins out of my riding.

The problem I've had.
The one thing in my head I can't shake.
Logs/log piles, 10" or bigger.
I've approached them with all my tools, and tricks in place, thinking I can do them, then stop short, and walk it over.

What is wrong with me?
Why can't I go this next step?
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
but I'm not a person who gets cold feet, so I have no personal experience.

:
post #5 of 16
What bike do you have? Suspension?

I can see where popping a wheelie and getting the front over, but not being able to get the rear unweighted as you push the front back down could be a problem. A couple of saddle hits to the groin can cause a little hesitation.
post #6 of 16
TC, can you wheelie, manual and bunny hop? These are all skills that will help with logs...and all around trail riding.

check out Lee McCormack's book (co-written by Brian Lopes):

Mastering Mt Bike Skills

It is really well written, will help riders of all skill levels and get you learning proper technique that won't have to be un-learned later.

You can get it at www.leelikesbikes.com
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
What bike do you have? Suspension?

I can see where popping a wheelie and getting the front over, but not being able to get the rear unweighted as you push the front back down could be a problem. A couple of saddle hits to the groin can cause a little hesitation.
I have two bikes.
Trek 4900, and Trek Liquid 25. The Liqiud 25 is fairly new to me, purchased because I was beginning to kick my riding up a notch and wanted the benefits of a FS.
Funny you should mention saddle hits. I did suffer such an incident, and it does happen to flash in my mind upon occasion, while I ride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
TC, can you wheelie, manual and bunny hop? These are all skills that will help with logs...and all around trail riding.

check out Lee McCormack's book (co-written by Brian Lopes):

Mastering Mt Bike Skills

It is really well written, will help riders of all skill levels and get you learning proper technique that won't have to be un-learned later.

You can get it at www.leelikesbikes.com
Just so happens I am a bit intimidated by wheelies, and my bunny hop is marginal at best.
All a part of that 6 inches between my ears that I have to get over first.
I'll definitely check out that book recommendation, and report back with some amazing riding stories.
Thanks
post #8 of 16
TC riding in un trailed woods? doing that is very difficult and jumping any logs in a untracked forest would be difficult.

Log piles over ten inches if they are smooth all you do is literally ride over them

Logs over Ten inches will requires some sort of uppull on your pedals after you have got the front wheel to clear. You dont have to bunny hop you just have to get the sprocket to kinda of clear the log, even a hit shouldnt stop you.

Untill you stop getting cold feet and actually try and maybe fall a couple times, its going to be really hard to determind which you need to do.

I'd show you but utah is pretty much deviod of log piles, I actually miss th western PA log piles of doom.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Bush, thanks!
I appreciate the info you gave me on IM yesterday. I didn't have time to work on it last night, but the tips you gave me come more naturally to me than those that I've gotten from another friend.

I agree that I need to do it and take my lumps. Maybe all I need to do is get hurt and get it out of my system.

Bigger log/log piles, and small drops are my goal this summer.
Gotta shake the head games!!!
post #10 of 16
Loosen teh tension on your brakes, or adjust the throw to engage later. You will carry more speed into the obstacle. Then its either clear it or fall over.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
Loosen teh tension on your brakes, or adjust the throw to engage later. You will carry more speed into the obstacle. Then its either clear it or fall over.
I know its not serious but super bad advice. With out getting that front wheel up nothing is going over no matter how fast you are going.
post #12 of 16
TC, Learn to manual.

Thats step #1.

Go out on flat (soft) ground and practice.

The move is pretty easy with suspension:

Push down on the handle bar to compress the fork, then rotate your center of mass back and down while keeping you arms straight (no need to pull up) push your feet forward on the pedals at the same time.

Arms straight...down on the bars...arms still straight hips back and down as you push the pedals forward...wheel comes up.

The bicycle is rotating, the rear wheel moves forward as the front wheel moves up and back...simple. If you are over rotating tap the rear brake.
post #13 of 16
To get over a log combine the manual with the EXACT technique used to absorb a mogul while skiing.

The log is the mogul, your rear tire is your skis.

Unweight and absorb with your hips and knees to let the tire travel up and over, push forward and down on the backside to stay in contact with terra firma.

easy.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Awesome!
Those tips/techniques make perfect sense to me. I have a lot of confidence that this is going to work for me, just as soon as I can get out of work early enough to try it out.
I'll be sure to report back............
post #15 of 16
So 8" of wood is small to you, and you can handle it perfectly and now you want to be able to handle 10" of wood........I knew it, size does matter!

Sorry I couldnt resist.




Back on track:
Is your bike full suspension?
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
So 8" of wood is small to you, and you can handle it perfectly and now you want to be able to handle 10" of wood........I knew it, size does matter!

Sorry I couldnt resist.




Back on track:
Is your bike full suspension?
1) Uh huh!
2) Uh huh! (Trek Liquid 25)
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