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Carbon Poles

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Are these worth the money? Why or why not. I'm not in the market, just thought I'd get people's opinions on the value of them.
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post #2 of 20
I think they are. They can take a lot of abuse and remain straight and in tact. Especially if you travel for skiing. You can throw them in with the vehicle or in the bag with your skis, and not have to worry about them getting bent or dented. You don't need to go real high end, in my opinion, but if you are going to get carbon poles, I think the woven carbon fiber is much more durable than the solid carbon poles, such as the Goode poles, because as I understand it, the Goode poles are seriously weakened if they get a knick or chip in them. I've also seen Goode, and similarly constructed poles, snap easily in really cold weather (20 below).
post #3 of 20
I got some Goode poles last winter and have been very pleased with them. They do have more flex than aluminum poles, however, so you have to trade off flex for bending...

I got them at: http://www.untracked.com/?brand=Goode%20Poles
post #4 of 20
I use 'em, I like'em.
post #5 of 20
I had a pair of Goode poles a few years ago and didn't like them at all. They were too flexible; I could feel them bounce and bend when I pole planted on hard snow. They eventually self destructed from wear caused by impacts with slalom gates (the outer surface got worn and the fibers began to separate, eventually breaking).
The other thing to consider is that since most carbon poles are a constant diameter from grip to tip although they may be lighter than aluminum poles, they can easily have a higher swing weight ie. the force you need to use to swing the pole each time you pole plant. This is because the taper of aluminum poles results in more of the weight being closer to the grip giving them a lower moment of inertia around the pivot point (your hand).
I have used Scott poles since I broke the pair of Goode's and even had one pair for 7 years with no problems until they were broken by some idiot who put the lift safety bar down too early, trapping my poles between the chair and the snow forcing them to bend badly. I bought a new pair and like them just as much as my old black/neon yellow ones. They feel really light and are strong and stiff.

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post #6 of 20
The upside to carbon is they are lighter and they don't bend like aluminum poles. The downside is they tend to snap instead of bend and aren't as stiff as aluminum. If you really abuse your poles I would stick to aluminum. If not, the light swing weight of carbon might be worth the extra cost (see if you can borrow a pair to try before buying). Personally, my family and I use the poles NEracerex mentioned.....they are almost as light as carbon and are very rugged.
post #7 of 20
I purchased a pair of Kerma Banshee's last year, after using Scott aluminum poles before. I will never go back to aluminum again. The difference in swing weight is vast -- carbon poles just swing themselves.

All that said, take into consideration the type of skiing you do. The larger the radius turn you make, the less important your pole plants become (IMHO), and the less picky you can be about your poles. I'm a short-turn fanatic, and I'm beginning to love bumps as well, so the reduced swing weight made a big difference to me.
post #8 of 20
There are so many different types of carbon poles on the market, and to say all carbon poles are better than all aluminum poles is pure nonsense. I use aluminum because they are as light as any top carbon pole, are stiff, are easily shortened, can have the grips riveted on so they don't spin (important on poles with bends), and don't cost a fortune (though mine are free, I don't have an unlimited supply). I have broken carbon poles in situations where an aluminum one would have bent and still have been useful until I got back to the main ski area. The only carbon pole brand I would consider is Swix, though the wholesale of $500 is a tough pill to swallow.
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
So general concensus is lighter/maneaverability and snap instead of bend for carbon VS cheaper, bend but can still be useful for aluminium. So does that extra bit of 'schwing' justify the big $?
post #10 of 20
You can snap an aluminium pole, too, I've got the scar to prove it.

I was at Sierra-at-Tahoe, bombing down a run (Dynamite, if memory serves) and caught a tip. Total yardsale. Snapped a pole, and didn't notice until later the several-inch cut on my arm.

The rental guy was kinda impressed [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
I've got new Kerma aluminium poles this season and they seem pretty good. Still, note to self - don't break one and slice arm :
post #12 of 20
carbon all the way, woven if you can afford it.

I have scott woven carbon poles - bought them after a snowboarder rode over my volkl carbon pole and snapped it straight off.
post #13 of 20
I have over 500 days on a pair of Carbon GOODE poles. Things are bulletproof. Upsides to carbon is the fact that they are much much lighter, the swingweight is much better. Have you ever had aluminmum poles and had sore hands from planting all day?? Carbon will make that go away (so will the leki trigger poles). Downside is that if you were to, for example, scrape with an edge, it is much more suseptable to breaking, it's just carbon nature. My fav. carbon poles are the leki's, but they are also expensive. GOODE does it for me, and I have 500 days to prove it.
post #14 of 20
over 700 days on my Goode carbons
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by ktrubin:
Have you ever had aluminmum poles and had sore hands from planting all day??
Short answer, no.

Long answer, good god, you must be kidding me, and no!!!

I've had sore hands from doing some things all day, but pole planting shure as shinola has never been one of them.
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by Ugli Pupferknick:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by ktrubin:
Have you ever had aluminmum poles and had sore hands from planting all day??
Short answer, no.

Long answer, good god, you must be kidding me, and no!!!

I've had sore hands from doing some things all day, but pole planting shure as shinola has never been one of them.
</font>[/quote]Think about how many times you squeeze and release your hands when planting.......stop saying i'm crazy......am i the only one who's noticed this??
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by ktrubin:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Ugli Pupferknick:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by ktrubin:
Have you ever had aluminmum poles and had sore hands from planting all day??
Short answer, no.

Long answer, good god, you must be kidding me, and no!!!

I've had sore hands from doing some things all day, but pole planting shure as shinola has never been one of them.</font>[/quote]Think about how many times you squeeze and release your hands when planting.......stop saying i'm crazy......am i the only one who's noticed this??
</font>[/quote]I didn't say you were crazy, but now that you mention it . . .

Question: won't you still be squeezing and releasing just as much no matter what the pole weight?

I can see how the weight savings could help with an arm injury or tendonitis or some other conditions, but hands, that's a new idea to me.
post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
Howdy Moose

Why carbon though? What specific benefits?
post #19 of 20
The only time I ever had sore arms from using aluminum poles was when cross-country skiing .

I bought a pair of Leki titanium alloy poles last year that I really like- very light, but less flexible than the carbon fiber ones. I still use my aluminum poles (Leki competition) sometimes, too- I keep the powder baskets on the TI ones for really deep snow days. They are certainly noticably lighter, and I like the swing weight, but fatigue isn't really part of the equation here.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by The Oz:


Why carbon though? What specific benefits?
What other benefits do you want?

There seem to be plenty discussed here and I concur with all of these.
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