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Limit Ticket Sales?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Should small resorts limit ticket sales? What should the priority be? Skier safety or ticket sales? I know resorts have to make money to survive and give us the skiing we so love, but I would rather pay more and have more open space to ski than duck skiers and boarders all day. Would you?
post #2 of 22
Lars, I think you are more likely to see ticket prices rise to follow the increased demand. $62+ at Killington certainly helps keep me away from there.

I think crowded slopes are exactly what resorts want. They would argue that those busy times are offset by slow periods caused by snow droughts and other factors. What is really needed is patrollers that are charged with pulling tickets for unsafe behavior, keeping obviously struggling skiers off double blacks, and encouraging boarders not to lay down and take naps in the middle of a trail (this one is the biggest challenge I face; kind of like laying down in the middle of an expressway).
post #3 of 22
Taos does it. I'm not aware of any other ski areas with the class to limit ticket sales.
post #4 of 22
Loon has always had a policy to limit ticket sales. You may not know it has limited the sales because it is quite crowded when the close the ticket windows. They have had only a handful of sell-outs in the past few season.

I think Lars is getting shell shocked by the masses. We need more terrain to spread out the skiers. I think part of the slope over crowding is due to high speed-high capacity lifts. I would rather see a longer lift line. Decrease the uphill capacity and reduce the numbers on the hill. It becomes like rush hour traffic on the slopes on weekends.
post #5 of 22
Yeah, Todd, when we ski Taos on a weekend, which we try to avoid, you can almost count the area being closed to traffic after ten in the morning. As you know, there are parking places all down along the access road where the skiers are picked up by trolly.

When they close the area they set up barricades across the road reading "Area Full" and leave just enough width of the street to turn around. It happened to me once. After that no more weekends at Taos.


....Ott
post #6 of 22
All of the "major" ( : ) Los Angeles area hills limit their ticket sales now. Or so they say. I only go to those places on weekdays, so I can only imagine the carnage. If I could only ski on weekends, I would probably play checkers.
post #7 of 22
Yep - I tell folks, when they complain of weekend and holiday crowds at areas: in this sport, if you really love it - and want the best experience, you've got to arrange your life so that you can ski midweek. Midweek is where the soul of skiing still survives, the best snow, open, much more free. If you can't (won't) arrange your life that way, then theres not much point complaining - because thats how it is unfortunately!
post #8 of 22
Alta does it as well. And I saw it happen a few times last year, which sucked, didn't have my pass yet. But then again, who would want to ski there? They have bad snow, no snowboarding, crappy terrain, and Utah beer laws...

I'd rather not get in to a resort than ski 4 runs all day due to lift lines.
post #9 of 22
Actually Todd, There ARE a few areas here that aren't very crowded on weekends. But they don't have snowmaking. Which means that they are not open yet.
post #10 of 22
Taos limits based on Ernie's philosophy although they tell people it is the Forest Service.
In SoCal we limit, at Mt High we have SkiData were all 1st time tickets are hard plastic with RF chips....you take it go on line and reserve then go straight to the lift, hands free auto scan at the turnstile...you don't reserve you don't get in.....of course the magic number is a secret, hah hah hah!
post #11 of 22
I'm pretty sure Deer Valley and/or Beaver Creek limit ticket sales.
post #12 of 22
Yes we do limit tickets sales at DV to 5,000 per day. Not because the mtn can't handle it.( our lift capicty is at 38,000 skiers an hour) But to avoid long lines in the lodges at lunch ( why must every one eat exactly at 12 noon?)
Even with our new day lodge coming on line, the limit most likely shouldn't go over 6,000 tickets.
By that i mean day tickets sold at the ticket window, and hotel tickets. :
post #13 of 22
I know NorthStar limits them, they "sold out" last Thursday.

I am pretty sure that Alpine does too. It might just be when the parking lot is full, no more cars can park, therefore no more peole can get in, not that they are "sold out"
post #14 of 22
Not sure if it's true or if anyone on this forum skis there regularly, but I think Sundance limits daily their ticket sales as well.
post #15 of 22
To my understanding, Alta also turns people away once their parking lots are full. Their web site says, "There may be times, especially during holiday periods, when Alta will not allow more skiers into the area. When those infrequent occasions arise, the timing is usually mid-morning through early afternoon." I've also heard that they're concerned that if people park on the road(s) that their vehicles would be in avalanche slide paths and that wouldn't be very good publicity if a bunch of cars were buried(it's happened before)!

If I remember right, doesn't Sundnace limit ticket sales too?

BTW, I was at PCMR last weekend and I think that they've unintentially limited their ticket sales by closing off most of their parking to get ready for the Olympics. I think it's almost time for them to start busing skiers in from 40! :
post #16 of 22
Parking at PCMR was already a mess, even before they closed part of the parking for the Olympic support trailers. Today i had a hell of a time getting out, thansk to the parking crew and how close they were parking cars together.
Even parking at DV has been effected big time by SLOC.
I agree, it's time they start using the high way 40 park n ride.

I didn't think Alta could limit thier ticket sales, caues the ski terrain is forset service land, unlike Deer Valley is leased form the mine company.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ January 04, 2002 08:19 PM: Message edited 1 time, by TR@DV ]</font>
post #17 of 22
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jim O'D:
We need more terrain to spread out the skiers. I think part of the slope over crowding is due to high speed-high capacity lifts. I would rather see a longer lift line. Decrease the uphill capacity and reduce the numbers on the hill. It becomes like rush hour traffic on the slopes on weekends.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I strongly disagree that we need more terrain, at least more lift served terrain. There's already more than enough development out there to handle the skiers.

Resorts yanking out detachable quads and replacing them with fixed-grip doubles seems a little unlikely! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #18 of 22
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TR@DV:
Yes we do limit tickets sales at DV to 5,000 per day. Not because the mtn can't handle it.( our lift capicty is at 38,000 skiers an hour) <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

WOW. That's a lot of uphill capacity for an area of that size! To put it in perspective Sun Valley, which is known to have short lift lines, has an uphill capacity of 28,000 on just over 2,000 acres (DV has 1,700 acres). Whistler and Blackcomb are each just under 30,000 skiers/hr.

I noticed Crystal Mtn in Washington has the same problem DV does, namely not enough restaurant space. Crystal has probably doubled their lift capacity in the last five years, so liftlines are usually short, but restaurant lines are often not!
post #19 of 22
Arrive early,maybe real early, have something to eat or drink if the lifts aren't open yet, get your runs in, when its 11:00 am and if you can't stand the wait in lift lies eat lunch early, ski from 11:45 to 1:30 pm, if again you can't stand the wait in lift lines, apres ski, then eat early, go to bed early, and ski early the next day. Party on the nights that you know, you won't be skiing the next day.

Because.........
post #20 of 22
It always strikes me as funny as how there are always two common threads running in this forum:

One is about how the ski industry is dying, skier visits are down, how can we get more people interested in the sport.

The other is about how crowded the resorts are, especially on the weekends and what can be done to keep more people off the mountains.

PS. Beaver Creek doesn't limit ticket sales, the slopes are a ghost town any day of the week. You can poach fresh powder days after it falls there.
post #21 of 22
Car park full = stop selling lift tickets makes the pro-public transport side of me very cross indeed.

One expensive Austrian resort (Lech possibly) limits access to the mountain to keep things uncrowded. The implication is that other European resorts don't.
post #22 of 22
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>you've got to arrange your life so that you can ski midweek<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I second that. Since shoulder weekend days (Friday/Saturday or Sunday Monday) have gotten more popular, my wife and I chose Wednesday/Thursday off this season.
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