New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

When to start waxing??

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Based on the idea that fast skis are made, not bought, is it too early to start waxing and prepping skis in anticipation of getting out in late November or would I be wasting wax and time to start hot waxing skis now?
post #2 of 14
I just waxed yesterday.

Which doesn't answer your question.
post #3 of 14
I don't see a downside to waxing and prepping 'early'. I do see plenty of positives:

1) Keeping your toys in good shape ready to go reduces added 'stresses' when it gets down to the wire when the snow flies again.
2) Wax is cheap. And if you consider repetitive waxings somewhat like season ing a cooking pan, more is better & having the luxury of time between waxings and scrapings, allows for more 'curing 'time.
3) It's good therapy while it helps to maintain and improve your skills, which could save bits of time later.
4) Allows you time to determine and research which additional/upgrades tools and supplies you might need and watch for deals.

(This reminds me to add a cycle or two to my newest boards, purchased late season.)

Remember:

Keep your toys in great shape and close at hand....you may never know when you need them at a moments notice.
post #4 of 14
Wax early, wax often!! There are other benefits too- last season when prepping for Mount Hood in July, my elderly neighbor comes over (mind you it's in the 80's- sunny- warm) and says "Do you know something I don't??"
post #5 of 14
How much wax do you all use per season?
post #6 of 14
I guess I would use over a kilo of wax per season (four pairs of skis). I waxed last night but then it is the NZ ski season so I am using them at the moment. I do not ski more than 3 days on a ski before it gets a full wax treatment. The main reason I tune and wax so frequently is the reduced turning effort and greater efficiency of a good sharp edge.

If a proper race prep is a minimum of 10 wax sessions then there can really be no harm in waxing once a week during the summer. The advantage of the warmer weather is that the bases will take longer to cool and therefore should, in theory, absorb more wax during the cooling process.

I notice a huge difference between leaving the skis in the hallway (reasonably cool) or sticking them in the bathroom (reasonably warm) in that for the later there is far less wax to scrape off in the morning (and I get a hard time from my wife - 'Is this where we store skis?' but that is a seperate issue).

Wax once a week and you should be able to get some serious wax into all your skis well in advance of the next season.
post #7 of 14
I'm working on iteration #5 of prep wax on my newly ground Dynamic VR17 Slaloms. I'll probably do 3-5 more. Impregnating the bases with as much wax as possible can only make life easier through the season and will help protect the bases while the skis are hibernating.

Agree with the therapy comment. Plus, it's cooler in my basement.
post #8 of 14
I forgot to mention (been discussed elsewhere) that I would not ski a new ski until I had put at least 8 layers of wax into it:

2-3 hot wax and scrapes to clean
3 base prep (soft wax)
2 layers of cold wax (CH 8? the blue stuff)
3 layers of UF5 (Solda low flouro Universal - good stuff actually)

Then I will wax for the conditions with at least two layers of temp/ condition specific (just in case I get lazy or too busy to wax after 3 days).

I think I need therapy actually!
post #9 of 14
So all your skis get low fluoro?

That combination of CH6 and low fluoro is a classic really, works almost everywhere I've been.




I've only noticed it squeak and grab on cold, early am Utah snow; CH7 or the Maplus purple are my picks for that.
post #10 of 14
I have some of the green stuff for super cold Colorado days (2-3 last season), during Jan/ Feb I tended to crayon both CH6 and LF (in squares like the Croatian Flag pattern) before ironing so that it mixed in and I got the best of both worlds.

I also tend to run the harder wax along the under foot edge areas in a straight strip before mixing LF into it.

Like I said I am almost in need of therapy when it comes to ski maintenance.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew R View Post
Like I said I am almost in need of therapy when it comes to ski maintenance.
Brother!!
post #12 of 14
I've found that the hottest days of summer are the best for ski prep for the next season, simply to have something to look forward to. So for the Northern Hemisphere, July and August are always good picks.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
I don't see a downside to waxing and prepping 'early'. I do see plenty of positives:

1) Keeping your toys in good shape ready to go reduces added 'stresses' when it gets down to the wire when the snow flies again.
2) Wax is cheap. And if you consider repetitive waxings somewhat like season ing a cooking pan, more is better & having the luxury of time between waxings and scrapings, allows for more 'curing 'time.
3) It's good therapy while it helps to maintain and improve your skills, which could save bits of time later.
4) Allows you time to determine and research which additional/upgrades tools and supplies you might need and watch for deals.

(This reminds me to add a cycle or two to my newest boards, purchased late season.)
Dude, you forgot the number one reason to wax in the summer! Drinking beer in the garage with your buddies fully supported by your SO!

Quote:
Honey, I need to wax your skis so they are super smooth on opening day
post #14 of 14
(Shhhhh....it's a code word......kinda like when my wife says she's going to 'play Bunco' with the girls. )
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs