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How to get good at skiing - Page 2

post #31 of 43
I'mma echo Barrett and PhilT's posts:

1. ski with people better than you that push you just the right amount and take you down stuff that might be just a tad outta your range. As long as they are confident you can do it, then it instills confidence in you, as well. For me, at least, that's always been the biggest hurdle, especially when skiing solo. I ride a lot with my old college chum who is a solid tele head (he started alpine, taught himself to snowboard, raced snowboards, then taught himself to tele) and over the past several seasons he has done wonders to boost my self-confidence on all types of terrain. used to be that i never felt comfortable hiking to stuff, now I'm gung-ho about it.

2. ski a lot. go as often as you can. go to as many different places as you can.

these would be the "cheapest" ways to get good, in my opinion.

i would also highly suggest going to any of the Epic gatherings. I can't comment on the ESA events, as I have yet to attend one, but I attended 2 of the 3 days of the Tahoe Gathering last season and made it out for 3 days of LGCIII. Both of those events totally helped my skiing as i ended up riding with some really great skiers (and super cool folks). taking off on runs with fellow Epic heads (and in many cases locals who knew the particular mountain better than me) was awesome. I also attended a TGR Maggot gathering at Mammoth in the Spring and that totally helped my skiing as well. Different group of skiers with different mindsets, which was great. I plan to hit several Epic and Maggot gatherings/events this coming season as they are great fun and also end up improving my game in the process.

of course a lot of folks are going to suggest lessons, which i'm all for, as well. I just always seem to forgo lessons in favor of riding with friends and really need to buck up and take a few refreshers on the days that I find myself skiing solo.
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
of course a lot of folks are going to suggest lessons, which i'm all for, as well. I just always seem to forgo lessons in favor of riding with friends and really need to buck up and take a few refreshers on the days that I find myself skiing solo.
That's all well and good, but how much will a random lesson here and there help you, and who will you be learning from. I think collaboration and having a cohesive plan will accelerate things. I'm not saying you need to be skiing with an instructor every day, but it couldn't hurt to ski with the same one when you do, and it would be even better if he knew what he was doing.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
That's all well and good, but how much will a random lesson here and there help you, and who will you be learning from. I think collaboration and having a cohesive plan will accelerate things. I'm not saying you need to be skiing with an instructor every day, but it couldn't hurt to ski with the same one when you do, and it would be even better if he knew what he was doing.
I got the impression that dookey67 is in a stage that he wish to empasize the application of techniques (in varying condition) more than the acquisition of more techniques.

Rightly or wrongly, he felt he needs more pratice in applying his current technical skill to increasingly challenging conditions, which the "gatherings" are a great venue, probably even MORE appropiate than ESA.

It is entirely possible that after some more of these excursions with other bears he may conclude he need a more structured instruction to take him up another level. But that doesn't sound like right now.
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
I got the impression that dookey67 is in a stage that he wish to empasize the application of techniques (in varying condition) more than the acquisition of more techniques.

Rightly or wrongly, he felt he needs more pratice in applying his current technical skill to increasingly challenging conditions, which the "gatherings" are a great venue, probably even MORE appropiate than ESA.

It is entirely possible that after some more of these excursions with other bears he may conclude he need a more structured instruction to take him up another level. But that doesn't sound like right now.
I thought we were looking for advice on how to start a new skier on the path to "being good".
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I thought we were looking for advice on how to start a new skier on the path to "being good".
I guess I over-looked the "new skier" part, because everyone here are not "new" to skiing...:
post #36 of 43
Thread Starter 
We're not necessarily talking about novice skiers getting good, but anyone who skis who is trying to get better--how are you doing it, and how would it be done if there were no limitations?
post #37 of 43
No limitations....hire a personal trainer/coach and ski 5 days a week for the whole winter for 2-3 years. Should get you as good as you can get short of being a pro.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
We're not necessarily talking about novice skiers getting good, but anyone who skis who is trying to get better--how are you doing it, and how would it be done if there were no limitations?
At least 10 days per year of lessons with the greatest coach you can find. As much time on the snow as you can fit in with a minimum of 25% devoted to drills. As much ski simulated dryland training as you can fit in. Additional work on strength and flexibility. Reading lots of ski literature and watching ski movies. Video of your skiing every 5 ski days (more often is even better).
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
I guess I over-looked the "new skier" part, because everyone here are not "new" to skiing...:
OK then, well I was not referring to Dookey67, I was talking in general.

That said, I've skied wih quite a few Barking Bears who seem to use the ski with better skiers plan as thier primary learning technique, and to be blunt, it ain't working. Maybe it does for some, but "pushing yourself" (and I mean over your head, not just a little outside your comfort zone) will only make you better at executing the movements you alrady have. If those aren't efficient movements, you will only be making yourself better at skiing poorly.

disclaimer: I'm not sitting in judgement here, just telling what I see. As a matter of fact, I used to be one of those very people. I thought I was good, but I just cringe when I see video of myself from 5 or 6 years ago. I was having fun, sure, and I could "ski the whole mountain", but i really had to work at it, and had a hell of a time with bumps, crud, and even powder. Chasing better skiers than myself on difficult mountains did not improve my skiing much, and if it did, it wasn't working very fast. The best thing that ever happened to me was spending a year skiing greens, a year skiing blues without poles didn't hurt any either.
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Maybe it does for some, but "pushing yourself" (and I mean over your head, not just a little outside your comfort zone) will only make you better at executing the movements you alrady have. If those aren't efficient movements, you will only be making yourself better at skiing poorly.
True enough. I see this all the time.
post #41 of 43

All of the above...

...but probably the biggest thing is "Know your limits...and exceed them frequently." In a responsible fashion, of course. Ski racing's done a lot for me, especially speed events. "Slalom and GS are just events, downhill is a cult..."
post #42 of 43
Thread Starter 
I believe the #1 asset of someone who is trying to get better at ANYTHING is humility. Being able to divorce your ego from your performance allows you to objectively observe and notice and make important distinctions that cue the right moves, which then can be grooved through repetition (and you know 1000 reps is the standard). Let's face it, getting better takes lots and lots of "perfect practice." You might as well try being your own best coach.
post #43 of 43

.....

Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
"I could choose the perfect students, they would all be 17 year old female athletes with overactive libidos. In less than 2 hours we would be doing something....."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
You're too narrow minded 17-27.
;-)...Richie, Anyone who doesn't ski NewEngland thru its highs and its lows gets a little narrow-minded....I think a few of us in NewEngland can agree on that....;-);-)
________________
As for myself, having been one that can easily read words into physical movements & sensations...easily, most all of my improvement has come from reading all the great discussions..then working on parts of my skiing, bit by bit...and tying them in with observations of better skiers on the mountain. Skiing a hill possessing nice vertical such as Sugarloaf masks very little, hence it's pretty easy to apply and observe in relatively short time.
The equipment Fit bump has helped a ton...especially in the boot dept. When one, for really the first time, finds the right fit in a boot's cuff, one's skiing can take a major bump in level, as you don't have to perform exaggerated forms of gymnastics(negating some relaxation)...in order to achieve & maintain one's angulation, momentum, and balance....and on the Last day of the season to boot;-);-)!
I've never prepared for a season to the extent that I have this time around...
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