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Long underwear and fabric softener?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know why polyester ski wear says "NO FABRIC SOFTENER"? I do not see this instruction on other synthetic garments.
post #2 of 20
Chemical Reactions. You know how long underwear can retain odors (chemicals from the body). Fabric softener will be retained in the underwear and it can cause premature wear by potentially breaking down the petrochemicals used in the underwear. Another problem is that all those extra chemicals can cause some nasty irritation on people's skin. I've seen it happen. You should find a mild detergent that can be easily rinsed out (and maybe do an extra rinse to get ALL the detergent out.
post #3 of 20
The sheets are wax-impregnated, the wax deposits on the clothing fibers making them slide more easily past each other, but also blocking the wicking action.

That said, I am trying to find more of the 'clear' 'free' type softeners (micronized silicone) that were so popular around Y2K, for use on nylon like my Camelbak straps. Oooh, that made them so cush instead of crusty and schwitz-hardened.
post #4 of 20
it retards moisture absorption-i wash all socks and long underwear without the softener.also, towels dry you off better without it, even tho it is a softer feel.
post #5 of 20
Try using instant powdered milk instead of fabric softener---leaves 'em feeling cling-free but without the other chemicals.
post #6 of 20
Fabric softener will actually "clog" breathable fabrics such as Gore-Tex and many first layers also
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by doogiedoc View Post
Try using instant powdered milk instead of fabric softener---leaves 'em feeling cling-free but without the other chemicals.
If I have a lot of dog hair, will it make it stop leaping on synthetic clothes as well? With a pack of Siberians, I need to use dryer sheets or everything looks like mohair.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvwalker51 View Post
Chemical Reactions. You know how long underwear can retain odors (chemicals from the body). Fabric softener will be retained in the underwear and it can cause premature wear by potentially breaking down the petrochemicals used in the underwear. Another problem is that all those extra chemicals can cause some nasty irritation on people's skin. I've seen it happen. You should find a mild detergent that can be easily rinsed out (and maybe do an extra rinse to get ALL the detergent out.
huh, learn something new every day. thanks for the info.
post #9 of 20
all good answers, however when using softning agents limit the amount going into the load of linen being washed. softners will put a coating on the fabric making the water hard to penetrate through, causing bad odor, breakdown of fibres, rash, and irritation. the best softners are the odorless ones. just be careful how much you use. good luck and happy cleaning.
post #10 of 20
Do "unscented" dryer sheets also cause problems?
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Do "unscented" dryer sheets also cause problems?
Yes.

http://www.madehow.com/Volume-7/Fabric-Softener.html
post #12 of 20
Dryer sheets have anti-static properties, and static electricity actually aids the process of moisture wicking which is part of what makes modern synthetics advantageous for thermal underwear.
post #13 of 20
And I guess dog hair has thermal properties, so it'll keep me warmer.
post #14 of 20
No offense, but fabric softeners and dryer sheets are for gapers.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
No offense, but fabric softeners and dryer sheets are for gapers.
No offense, but that seems to be a typical comment from you, so I am putting you on Ignore as people who like to go around labelling people usually have little value to offer.
post #16 of 20
Damn! Yet another potential friend lost.

Maybe instead of putting me on "ignore" you could get a sense of humor?

Look - Fabric softener (and many detergents, for that matter) clog up polypro and other fabrics such as GoreTex. I'd rather have clothes that keep me dry and don't stink than have clothes that don't irritate my ultra-sensative baby-like gaperskin.
post #17 of 20
post #18 of 20
As well as the anti static properties dryer sheets contain all sorts of chemicals that you are then quite happy to wear against the largest organ in our body in its dilated state (ie skin with pores open due to exercise).

Ever had a filling? Ever had topical anaesthetic applied before the needle? Ever wonder how it worked? Absorption

The absorption capabilities of the skin are truely remarkable and it always amazes me that people are happy to have on their skin the same chemicals that they use to polish their cars.

Give your body and your thermals (and your goretex) a break - use natural soap flakes to wash it.

Even better really give your body a break and buy some Icebreaker or Smartwool merino thermals. Breath better, wick better, better for the skin.
post #19 of 20
I would never dispute skin absorption, nor that fragrances and suchlike react with skin, sometimes quite unpleasantly.

Where you lose me is the apparent idea that polyester is somehow more natural against skin than a silicon-based polymer. I also think that any washing product meaningfully deserving of the word "natural" has as many ancillary chemicals as any of the washing products deliberately fashioned by chemists.

Icebreaker: no thanks, got a skin rash from it.
post #20 of 20
The main skin issue with fabric softeners is that they contain chemicals called "optical whiteners" which make the clothing item's hue look brighter. These chemicals are however, potential skin irritants, and when worn against the skin, especially when one perspires, they get onto the skin's surface and can produce irritant dermatitis. Try taking about 1/4 cup of instant powdered milk and dump it in with your laundry detergent. It acts to neutralize static charge which is basically what fabric softeners do, but without the irritant potential (and no, your clothes won't smell like rotten milk...)
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