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Tuning Bench - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabinfever View Post
Anyone have a good system for cleanup of the filing and wax shavings mixed with just a little of the filing 50/50 solution? I'm using a shop brush / dust pan now but what I have in mind is cutting a hole the size of a shoe box into my workbench and attaching a shop vac underneath. That way I could just push the junk to the hole and let the shop vac do the rest. Oh.... don't forget to put a cheap carpet remnant under your work space. I've managed to grind a nice track of wax into my basement floor along the side of my bench.
I have got a set of wine boxes which I have taped together underneath the edge of the bench ie it catches whatever falls off both sides of the ski. I have an old drop sheet under the boxes so that I am not getting wax and ptex into the concrete. The edges of the boxes are a great place to wipe the scrapers clean as well. When they are full I just empty them into the bin.

But you are right a bench with a rectanglular hole the length of it would be great. The vice clamps mount on the inside edge so the ski sits over the hole, all filings and scrapings fall through into a catch tray which is under the bench so you are not tripping over it or kicking it when you are tuning. Ideally the bench would have a shelf at the back for all the tuning tools, a back light, space for a dremel and the waxing iron.

I had the idea the other day that when I build my dream garage/ office/ boy's room - I am having my ski tuning bench and mountain bike maintenance stand mounted on a platform that is on a set of tracks. There will be sliding or roller door in the wall of the garage so when the weather is great I can slide open the door, unlock the platform and slide it outside. Think practical version of 'Magic Fridge' - http://www.metacafe.com/watch/70680/magic_fridge_2006_superbowl_commercial/
and without teenagers stealing your skis or bikes.

Said dream garage office will have beer fridge, wide screen LCD TV with cable (sports package), BBQ and comfortable sofas so the boys can hang out and tune skis or repair bikes, eat drink and catch a game or two (rugby union or ice hockey preferably).
post #32 of 50
If anyone has rough drawings or photos of this wonderful bench system, I think we're going to finish the basement this winter and it'd be great to give an idea of what is needed in the workshop/ski tuning room to the builder.

Right now we've got two tuning benches set up in the kennel. At least it's company.
post #33 of 50
I'd definitely get one of these. My father has one in his shop, with ductwork routed to several different tools... just don't stand too close because those things really suck. Keep your tools, pets, and small children out of the way.
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
If anyone has rough drawings or photos of this wonderful bench system, I think we're going to finish the basement this winter and it'd be great to give an idea of what is needed in the workshop/ski tuning room to the builder.
Overhead power outlets are money.
post #35 of 50
Heluva,

Now you are talking. Any idea how these compare to good shop vac for suction? What size is needed to link up to four tools? I guess if you had a shutoff for each tool you could make do with a smaller size. What do you think?
post #36 of 50
-ventilation
-tool & supply drawers, coupled with peg boards or other wall storage system
-good general lighting & task lighting
-ventilation
-ski & snowboard racks
-work surfaces
-tunes
-overhead outlets or swagged cord as Comprex said
-cleanable floor surface
-utility sink
-shop vac or central vac
-ventilation (did I say that already?)

And for a different approach to setting up a sliding vise. I also made a mod for the lasso clamp so that can slide as well. Fast and secure. Plus you can rotate the vise 90° and secure two alpine skis or a snowboard, along with two pair of nordic skis.
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabinfever View Post
Heluva,

Now you are talking. Any idea how these compare to good shop vac for suction? What size is needed to link up to four tools? I guess if you had a shutoff for each tool you could make do with a smaller size. What do you think?
I think my father's is one of the 2hp models and it is linked to 4 areas in the shop and can be attached to several different tools. One connection is overhead, which is what I use for collecting debris when I tune my skis in his shop. They pick up just about anything, and have larger tubes than a standard shopvac so they swallow large debris much easier. As for the application to a tuning bench, I would have a catch under the bench and several places to brush the wax and edge shavings into a collection area to avoid creating dust.

If you're going to go all out... a hot box is a cool thing to have too... so are some of these...

Later

GREG
post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabinfever View Post
I've managed to grind a nice track of wax into my basement floor along the side of my bench.
Is there a downside to this other than a slippery floor? Seems to me it'd make the concrete a bit more waterproof and shed staining in that area. I have this in the kennel where we work.
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Is there a downside to this other than a slippery floor? Seems to me it'd make the concrete a bit more waterproof and shed staining in that area. I have this in the kennel where we work.
Stains, dirt gets in there with the wax so the whole thing looks blochy.
post #40 of 50
Clock. I get much of my tuning done in the morning before skiing but always seem to run out of time going for that last wax or edge resulting in a crabby wife while moving the family toward the vehicle. I keep meaning to get a cheap clock to get things running smoothly in the AM.
My set up is a standard L shaped basement work bench made out of old kitchen counter supported with 2x4 cleat on the wall side and 2x4 legs and front supports. I've got a peg board, shelves and a beat up old armoire for storage. Lighting is good. I should probably improve the ventilation even though I only use hydrocarbon wax since I'm skiing for recreation and the kids are freestyle mogul junkies. The bench doubles as a regular workshop as needed.

More ski storage is always better.

Rather than dry all the skis after the day I just separate them and put them into the basement rack as singles and have never had any rust form.

Ahh.... talking about skiing is good but the real thing is better. The season is coming.
post #41 of 50
I will be adding tunes and a beer fridge, thanks Alpinord
post #42 of 50
Thread Starter 
I've used my new tuning bench. I bolted a 2X6 to the table top and I mounted the vice to the 2X6. The table top is 44" long but by having a longer 2X6, I have more options on where to attach the ski vice to support the skis (this is really good when dealing with my kids skis (140 cm) and my skis (170 cm) fence.

I recently purchased a rubber mat to make it easier on my legs when waxing multiple pairs of skis.

I'm thinking of adding an air cleaner to my workshop as deal with dust. I have a shop vacum but to deal with finer dust particles you need a proper air cleaner system (my tuning area is also my woodworking workshop).
post #43 of 50
Have you tried a 2-stage fine dust filter and /or fine dust collection bags or your shop vac?

Rockler is another source for shop supplies and dust removal systems.
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
It probably looks something like this but doubled up:
That's pretty much exactly what it looks like. The stand for the iron was pretty much a necessity once I got the digital iron as I didn't want to drop it and the table to which it is attached is just a spare piece of pine that I had lying around and which I screwed to the 2 x 12. I also have a compressor nearby which I use to clear the brushed wax off of the skis.
I've been using the stand / vises combo for a few years and it has worked well. The biggest expense was the two sets of clamps, but I got them at half price. With the Workmate, the total cost was around $200.

http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/c...kk9/bench2.jpg

http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/c...ckk9/bench.jpg
post #45 of 50
And........two drills with roto brushes.......dude! You must fly. :
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
And........two drills with roto brushes.......dude! You must fly. :
Good eye, Alpinord. But if you looked even closer, you would see around 4 kilograms of Maplus wax that I bought from that Slidewright dude. I couldn't pass up the great deals he had and I would be forever removing all that wax with hand brushes.
post #47 of 50
I found this link for instructions on how to build a tuning bench for $5 ... ok it's for XC but I thought you might find it interesting.

http://www.parryloeffler.com/waxbench.htm
post #48 of 50
Heluva has a nice setup, especially if does what he needs it to do. I'll agree with Spyderjon. If you have the space, nothing beats a true work ski bench.
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post
I live in an apartment now, so I just put my skis on the kitchen counter. I can side file them, or repair base damage and edge separations, but not flatten the bases.
Nice. With good tools you don't need a ski to be clamped securely in order to properly file edges, its just nice to have them not sliding around. Really you don't so much need a vise.

Skis aren't very stiff, so when setting a bevel with hand tools technique is critical and no vise is going to change that. I'm of the opinion that any action which requires the ski to be kept square and flat (base work, mostly) should be done with large machines imported from Europe that sit on the floor and plug into the 3 phase outlet. There is a reason why those machines are as big and heavy as they are...

My favorite most-purpose ski bench is made with one-by lumber, a set of dowel pins for location to the workbench surface, a removable/movable center support, and ends covered in permanently tacky material (urethane, IIRC) that grabs steel and plastic parts well and won't damage or mar them. I forget the name of the manufacturer, but a little bit of imagination could put a nice version right on your countertop or workbench. An adjustable backstop added to the basic design makes scraping and brushing a cinch.
post #50 of 50
Doctor D, Great idea. I'm putting it on the to-do list and will report back once it goes into use.
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