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Need some new bike tires... - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
On longer rides I get discomfort and numbness in my arms, these bars put me in a more relaxed position.
That's when I start thinking maybe the stem's too low, the handlebars maybe not quite far enough away.
post #32 of 53

Bumping an old thread for some new advice.

 

Need to replace my road tires for the upcoming season. Coming from:

 

Specialized Turbo Comp, 700x23c, aramid bead, 120TPI, w/ Double Black Belt protection
 

 

 

Not sure where to go. (also looking to upgrade from stock wheels...I'll start another thread on that later)  Mostly used for training/ light racing. Will put about 3k miles on just the road ride this summer.

 

Thanks for the input!

post #33 of 53

I ride 25mm tires always.  They are absolutely no slower than 23 and much more comfortable -- esp if you live where roads are rough.  I've ridden the Michelin ProRace and the Conti Grand Prix 4000 recently.  I prefer the Conti's.  They'll last your season if you're not tough on them.

post #34 of 53

Continental Grand Prix 4-seasons are great tires.  Basically a beefed up version of the GP 4000S... with an extra layer of vectran breaker and has reinforced sidewalls...  700x25c

 

Next up...tubeless on the road bike.

 

Right have tubeless on the Mountain Bike (Specialized Renegade Control & Captain Control) and Cyclocross bike (Captain 2BR)

post #35 of 53

Ever been on the Micheline Pro Race series? Someone recommended them to me.

 

I havent ever tried the 25's but the Conti's sound like they might be a good fit.

post #36 of 53

I rode only Michelin ProRace (mostly 25's) for years.  Smooth, supple, fast.  But they don't seem to hold up as well over time for me, getting cut and losing some of the "feel". 

I'm liking the Conti's better nowadays.

post #37 of 53

I put in around 5,000 miles per year on my road bike, doing a lot of long-distance rides over varied surfaces.

 

First things first: tch is right about 25mm tires! You lose no rolling resistance, get a more comfortable ride, and the tires wear longer, as well! I race on 25mm tires and they work great!

 

As for brands, I stick primarily to Continental Grand Prix 4000S (which is actually a 24mm in its advertised 25mm width). I also use the Michelin Krylion in a 25mm width (true to width), which has been replaced by the Pro4 Endurance in Michelin's line. 

 

The Pro2 Race was a wonderful tire: great grip, low rolling resistance, smooth ride, and was good for about 2,000 miles of mixed riding. Its successor, the Pro3 Race, had slightly better grip but much lower durability and flat protection. I was lucky to get 1,200 miles out of one of these tires - a lot of money for little return. The Krylion/Pro4 Endurance is a far better tire.

 

Friend of mine also swear by the Vittoria Open Corsa Evo, which has a high-thread-count casing that is the same they use in their tubular tires. I've tried a pair, and the ride quality is sublime. I can't however, speak to the durability of these tires.

post #38 of 53

Actually, 25mm width tires have lower rolling resistance, cet. per., than narrower tires.  They do have higher aerodynamic drag.

 

I rode a set of Michelin Pro Race 3 tires and they were the worst tires I ever rode -- they consistently flatted.  I've been riding Vredestein Fortezza Tri-Comp's and have had really good experience with them, both in clinchers and tubulars.  Decent rolling resistance, very durable, and no flats.

 

Mike

post #39 of 53
Thanks for the advice. After chatting with the guys at the lbs, I ordered a pair of the 4000s'.

Now to solve my wheel dilemma.
post #40 of 53

Nice call, my buddy and I both have the 4000s and love 'em (the tires, that is).

post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by maineskiaddict View Post

Thanks for the advice. After chatting with the guys at the lbs, I ordered a pair of the 4000s'.

Now to solve my wheel dilemma.

have Mavic ksyrium elite on my road bike....

though my other bikes have Stan's notubes rims (alpha 400 & arch ex)
post #42 of 53

Cheap, light wheels that are better than they should be for the price: November Wheels FSW alloy.  $525/set

post #43 of 53

Best kept secret out there:  Shiny Bikes.  They're based in the UK but I've never had a problem whatsoever with availability, shipping, or Customs into Canada.

 

http://www.shinybikes.com/road-wheels/

 

LBS wanted $1000 for a Campy 2-way clincher wheelset, I got them for $400 shipped from Shiny Bikes over the pond, including lightweight Campy skewers.  I almost crapped my shorts when I saw the price.  I'd prefer to support the LBS, but I couldn't justify it for THAT big a difference.

post #44 of 53

Here's the issue with wheels:  what do you want, aero or weight?  If you are doing a ton (like 8-10k) of climbing in a ride, then weight trumps aero.  If, however, you are riding flats, rollers, and the like, then aero by far trumps weight.  The grams you save in a lightweight wheelset may make a difference of 10 watts climbing, but aero can make 20.  So, if you are needing an aero set, then you've got a few choices:  Zipp, Reynolds, and Flow (pretty cheap, but probably not a good choice if you are light weight).  I love my Zipp aero wheels (tubular 808 backa nd 404 front), but it is a handful in the breeze, and we have a lot of breeze in Colorado.  My regular training set of wheels is an Americah Classic Hurricane.  Seems to be relatively lightweight and indestructible (well, I did take the front wheel out hitting a bunch or rocks in the road at 40 mph.  That being said, I've got 12k miles on the wheel set...)

 

Mike

post #45 of 53

^^^^^^^^^  I agree...to an extent.  Then there's the issue of "feel".  If you're not really training or racing, if you just ride cuz you like the experience, I think lightness is more important.  Light wheels FEEL  faster for a lot of riders/situations.  I agree with Habacom that aero ARE faster if you're not climbing a lot....but they feel heavy, slow to spin up, and squirrely in winds.  Once you get going there is a kind of momentum that carries forward but it's not the same as that instant "go" you get from light wheels.

post #46 of 53

The wheel thing is up in the air. I'm not doing any racing...mostly tons of training and endurance rides. (aiming for a couple centuries this summer) My average ride is somewhere between 35 - 50 and I get out 5ish times a week. (more if the weather cooperates)

 

I had looked into the Ksyrium Elites. It looks like Mavic has changed the line a bit so the Elites are now something else. Basically looking for something to make the long distances more enjoyable.  Stil riding the factory wheels that came on my Tarmac. I noticed I lose a lot of roll on the descend and also the climb.  Anyone know anything about the Rapide SL 35's?

post #47 of 53
the ksyrium elite s comes with tires

my lbs, which is a big specialized dealer aren't fans of Roval wheels

people complain the ksyrium elite ride rough. I haven't noticed with the zertz dampened fork on my Specialized Secteur

for a more comfy ride, you want longer double butted spokes with cross lacing
post #48 of 53

One issue worth considering when ordering Campagnolo components from overseas: the warranty will not be honored outside of the country of official sale. It's not a big issue with Campy stuff, usually, but if a problem that would normally be covered by warranty pops up, don't expect Campagnolo North America to honor the warranty. Just a heads up as a fellow Campy rider...

 

Yes, rolling weight is worth considering, but overall comfort on long-distance rides can't be discounted, nor can the fact that low-spoke-count (LSC) wheels aren't ideal for folks over 175-180 pounds. I'm not a small guy (6' 4", 180 lbs. during peak riding season), and I used to ride LSC wheels for most things. But I went through rims and spokes with some frequency, and eventually decided to go with custom-built, 32-spoke wheels for my training and event wheels. I run Campagnolo Record hubs with DT Revolution spokes and either Velocity Aerohead or HED Belgium rims. I get the same weight for the pair of wheels (around 1,480 grams) as the LSC wheels (e.g. Mavic Ksyrium), but with a more comfortable ride and higher durability (due to less load pressure on each spoke). Yes, I give up a little on the aero side, but it's not enough to be of any real consequence in real-world riding conditions.

 

Also, the HED rims are 24mm wide, so the 25mm tires pair beautifully.

 

FYI: if you do go with LSC wheels and are willing to go mail-order, the wheels from Neuvation and Williams are top-notch and offer big bang for the buck, as well as excellent support if things go wrong.

post #49 of 53

YMMV - I'm a 200 lb guy that rides broken and or dirt roads on low-spoke count wheels (Dura-Ace 7801) and I've never even had to touch a spoke nipple on them. I say get whatever wheels you want, but look really hard at getting RoadTubeless/2-Way Fit. This stuff is great, and there are now a few more options for tires. I'm still running 23mm Hutchinson Fusion2s, but you can get 25 and 28mm tires for them now as well.

post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

YMMV - I'm a 200 lb guy that rides broken and or dirt roads on low-spoke count wheels (Dura-Ace 7801) and I've never even had to touch a spoke nipple on them. I say get whatever wheels you want, but look really hard at getting RoadTubeless/2-Way Fit. This stuff is great, and there are now a few more options for tires. I'm still running 23mm Hutchinson Fusion2s, but you can get 25 and 28mm tires for them now as well.

 

Agreed, epic - YMMV. :)

 

I do a lot of riding on dirt and broken pavement, as well, and I tend not to break spokes. That said, I've cracked a rim or two on LSC wheels in the past, though the warranty replacements have held up well (due in no small part to redesign of the rims at the spoke holes - Neuvation R28 SL3 cracked, the SL6 rim that replaced it has been rock solid).

 

As far as road tubeless is concerned, I'm not completely sold on it just yet. I've tried them, and the ride quality is quite nice. If I liked the quality of the available tires, I'd be more apt to switch (never been a big fan of Hutchinson Fusions, and I've yet to try the new-school Specialized rubber).

post #51 of 53
I'm pretty sure Specialized tubeless tires are made by Hutchinson, so not sure it will be different. I think Maxxis has a tire now that you could try. What did you not like about the Hutchinsons?
Edited by epic - 3/7/13 at 11:25am
post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

I'm pretty sue Specialized tubeless tires are made by Hutchinson, so not sure it will be different. I think Maxxis has a tire now that you could try. What did you not like about the Hutchinsons?

the new Roubaix 23/25 tubeless are not made by Hutchinson. it's made in Japan this time around

iirc, last year, Maxxis introduced the Padron tubeless tire
post #53 of 53

Take a look at ROL wheels, made in Austin, TX.  I just got a set and so far I'm impressed with the quality of build.  They also get good reviews just about everywhere.

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