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Marker Selective Control bindings

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I just purchased some rock skis off e-bay mounted with the old Marker SC (selective control) bindings. These are the ones with the external springs on the heel. These bindings also have the plastic heel rotation limiter. I've used these bindings in the past however, I seem to be stumped about how to increase the sole length adjustment. Should I loosen the large Philips screw in the middle of the base plate then push a flat screwdriver in the flat opening in the nose piece? Where should the boot heel strike the heel rest of the binding? Also, does anyone know what the selective control switch on the toe piece actually does?:
post #2 of 20
These are the MRR SC. IMHO, these are the type of bindings that gave Marker a bad name. Unless you don't have any other bindings, take them off the skis and use something else.
post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
Also, does anyone know what the selective control switch on the toe piece actually does?:
It is cut like a cam with a large tooth on it; the tooth can either
- not engage a facing plastic centerpiece (free flex under foot)
- engage the facing plastic centerpiece with the tooth sliding into a profiled slot in the centerpiece, pushing the cheeks of the slot apart (resistance flex underfoot)
- engage the facing plastic centerpiece with the tooth blocked at the contact point (no flex underfoot)

It sort of worked back when ('96? '97?) but it called for real finesse (only push at the snow just harder than it pushes at you) to tell the difference.

It is way clunky by modern standards.

ps some of the M1SCs had turntable heels.
post #4 of 20
The select control bindings I had (and sold on Ebay as they had way too much play in the toe piece) had a plate that was removed then the toe and heel had another set of screws mounting them up. How much movement do you need on the heel- if it is a small amount then the screws on the binding peice itself may be enough for adjustment. If it is not a few mm then you will probably have to get a remount. If a remount is required then pull them off and move onto something newer as others recommended. I am no tech and getting the bindings off was a challenge due to the plugs in the center plate of the binding hiding hte screws etc.
post #5 of 20
plus if you look closely i bet the heel cup is broken....
post #6 of 20

There's a word they use on Antiques Roadshow

"patina"
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
I- not engage a facing plastic centerpiece (free flex under foot)
- engage the facing plastic centerpiece with the tooth sliding into a profiled slot in the centerpiece, pushing the cheeks of the slot apart (resistance flex underfoot)
- engage the facing plastic centerpiece with the tooth blocked at the contact point (no flex underfoot)
So which setting is which? And what difference would it, theoretically, make?

I have a pair of these on my old 200 GS skis, and I've never known what setting to use.
post #8 of 20
If you're clicked in, looking down:

1) left- freest flex
2) middle-resistance flex
3) right - toepiece locked to track

The effectiveness depends hugely on the snow consistency and the ski flex (and the ambient temperature, and so forever on).

I used to like the middle setting for frozen coral reef while on p30RSs and the right setting on FMJ Volants while tailgunning jump turns on really soft slushy snow. I'm sure I'd mostly prefer to be rid of those boat anchors today.

There was a fleeting moment just there where I thought of digging them out for use with a Hawx boot. It passed quickly.
post #9 of 20

Here ya go.

22 is the main engagement tooth.
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post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 

M1 Sc

Wow, thanks for all the info. These bindings are the M1 SC. I take it these are better than the MRR? Evidently, the guy I bought them from had them spring tested and they were up to spec. I cannot see any heel cup cracks. The cups are plastic. I do have a couple of old bindings that I could swap but, I'd rather avoid this, the skis are already drilled twice. The bases are abused and filled with a lot of P-Tex. Its a miracle this guy never seperated an edge. I'm also a pretty powerful guy. (6'0" 225#, more full back type than couch potato) Perhaps Franz Klammer? I wish.
post #11 of 20
Thanks, comprex. Given that mine are mounted on oldish school GS skis, I'm not sure that the settings would make any difference, but maybe I'll play with it if we get another string of pseudo EC days next year.
post #12 of 20
Personally, I wouldn't ski them.
post #13 of 20
The two screw on either side directly behind the springs adjust boot sole length/forward pressure. The "selective control" does absolutely nothing.

No - seriously, SC changed the way I ski.
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 

M1 Sc

Well now I'm not sure whether to keep them on or not. I was just getting ready to post on whether to use epoxy to fill the binding holes. I can recall two times in "the day" skiing these bindings and liking them. One set didn't have the heel rotation limiter. I think it was an M50?, around 1983. I have a set of rossi/look turntable heel type binding that a lot of people seem to like on their twin tips. It would require a freehand remount by yours truly.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
Well now I'm not sure whether to keep them on or not.
They're really heavy, and the toepieces have been updated/re-designed at least twice since then.

Which model Look/Rossi?
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

binding

I believe they are a Rossi Axial pro 100.
post #17 of 20
That's the DIN 2-10 one? Hmmm, suboptimal for your size.
post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 

bindings

Yes the Rossi's highest DIN is 10. I had another idea, I am planning to purchase some Public Enemy skis with a new binding. I haven't selected one yet. Maybe there is something with a baseplate that I could switch from ski to ski? I would like it to be cheap as is the rock skis (Troublemakers) were only $35.
post #19 of 20
Just a warning to be careful the plate you get matches your switching expectations. In my recent research into bindings and baseplate, I had thought that perhaps I could get a plate that would make switching bindings between skis easy, but when I looked at most of the plates, they were plastic. It would be ok for a once or twice thing, but not for continuous repeated swapping back and forth. I settled on some Tyrolia FF17s, for my Volants and gave up on the idea of having two bindings for four skis.
post #20 of 20
In my experience, you can share a pair of bindings among multiple pairs of skis. However, this is most easily and best done serially, rather than in parallel.
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