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Meteorologist predicts that Colorado could attract snow-hungry European skiers

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
At its annual meeting last week the Colorado ski industry was given a foretaste of the effects of global warming by meteorologist Robert Henson. He predicted:

- a possible decline in snow cover across the Rockies of 25 to 50 percent in a relatively short time. He pointed out that the average snowpack in the Cascades of the Pacific Northwest has already declined by 15 to 30 percent.
- that “it’s pretty clear it’s due to what we’re putting in the air." He pointed out that the 2007 levels of CO2 "far exceed" anything seen in the natural range over the last 650,000 years.
- that Rocky Mountain ski areas could start drawing more skiers and snowboarders from Europe, which experienced a bad early season drought this past winter, along with temperatures three to five degrees higher than average in January and February.

This report from Summit Daily News.

Was this meteorologist serious with that third prediction? It comes across as "I've got great news for you" when, in reality, it would involve European skiers burning massive amounts of fuel to chase the planet's dwindling snows.

I'm getting increasingly sceptical about the ski industry's response to climate change. If we're part of the problem, then shouldn't we be part of the solution?
post #2 of 17
David,

I am posting here because no one else did. And they should have. It's a good article as are the other topics you uncovered

The question is; will global warming come back nest season
post #3 of 17
I think they already come here!
post #4 of 17
Not sure what Henson was trying to do. Attempting to get more press coverage by "sweetening the pill" and presenting a different angle?

Kelly Ladyga's response seemed to put a better perspective on things.
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Goldsmith View Post
- that Rocky Mountain ski areas could start drawing more skiers and snowboarders from Europe.
Dream on!:
post #6 of 17
PH, sounds more like a nightmare
post #7 of 17
The Canadian Rockies seem to be the destination of choice for Brits & Europeans. I don't have hard numbers, but based on impressions Banff saw more U.K & European visitors than the resorts I visited in Colorado and Utah while skiing last year.

Michael
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv View Post
The Canadian Rockies seem to be the destination of choice for Brits & Europeans. I don't have hard numbers, but based on impressions Banff saw more U.K & European visitors than the resorts I visited in Colorado and Utah while skiing last year.

Michael
Doesn't matter if "more" of them goes to Canada, "some" are going to Colorado. That's all it matters to Colorado.
post #9 of 17
Another factor, exchange rate - more bang for the buck in Canada. But that's changing.

Western Canada will also be hurt by global warming - faster than the higher elevation Colorado areas.

It would be nice to know where they go in Canada. Most, I'm sure wind up at Whistler. Few wind up at Red and Fernie and the like.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
It would be nice to know where they go in Canada. Most, I'm sure wind up at Whistler. Few wind up at Red and Fernie and the like.
Paul, FYI this is the list of resorts in Canada offered by the UK's largest tour operator, Crystal Ski:
http://www.crystalski.co.uk/destinat...da/canada.html
(You are probably right that Whistler dominates that market.)
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Another factor, exchange rate - more bang for the buck in Canada. But that's changing.
Amen....I went to Montreal over Memorial Day and got C$1.04 for my US$1.00. For short trips, it's not worth the exchange fee.
post #12 of 17
At $2 to the pound, the US is a tempting proposition.

Other pros: Great snow.

A better attitude to off-piste in-bounds. Er ...

Cons: Long, long trip.

The terrain isn't as good (sorry, it's just not).

Apres-ski: better in Europe, as a rule. Having said that, Park City ain't bad.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandgroper61 View Post
At $2 to the pound, the US is a tempting proposition.

Other pros: Great snow.

A better attitude to off-piste in-bounds. Er ...

Cons: Long, long trip.

The terrain isn't as good (sorry, it's just not).

Apres-ski: better in Europe, as a rule. Having said that, Park City ain't bad.
Euros get nervous about traveling to red states.

Tree skiing is fun and they don't get to. The terrain is good when you consider the snow quality and where you can go. Plus, you spend so much time getting to where the good stuff is over there. Plenty of flat dull in between, time wasting. We are smaller and more precise.

Skiing in Europe is fun in that you meet people from many different countries and everyone is ready to have a good time.

The food!
post #14 of 17
Ummmm......last time I checked, meteorologists couldn't even predict with any accuracy what the weather was going to be like five days from now, let alone next winter, let alone ten years from now, let alone next century.

Some of the biggest moron gapers I saw last year were a group of frogs on the Hight T.
post #15 of 17
Skiing in the US ? Been there. Done that.

I am unlikely to ski in Colorado though. If the US want to fingerprint everybody and give them a hard time at customs I will look elsewhere for my holidays. It is bleeding obvious that I am not a terrorist.

Whistler is the best destination resort in North America anyway.
post #16 of 17
Paul: you're right about the tree skiing - you can do it in Europe, and I have, but it's far more easily accessible in the States and the tactic of glading runs is superb. I disagree about the "flat dull"; that's simply a function of not knowing where you're going.

Each country/continent has its own attractions - one of my best days of skiing ever was at Alta with the snow bucketing down and the wind high. Plenty of lifts shut but what was left was still ample, particularly as I didn't have anyone to show me where to go ... just took off and saw what happened. Brilliant.

But I've had days to match it in Europe. It's all about getting on the snow and having fun, so I for one don't care where anyone does it!
post #17 of 17
So....if CO is supposed to have 40 - 80 (adding the amounts) percent less snow shortly, then the average 250" per year they get will dwindle to 50 to 150 inches of snow. Not exactly the kind of totals many EUers will cross the Atlantic for.
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