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Bag of Tricks - Page 2

post #31 of 50
One of the devices that I used several years ago with a physically challenged four year old; was to take two graphics of eagles eyes (enlarged them), printed them and rubber cemented them on two of my elbow pads from inline skating. I then would have the four year old wear them on his knees, over his ski pants. When we were skiing he would then point his knees, with the eagle eyes, so that they would see where he wanted to go.



We don't grow too old to play, we grow old because we stop playing - Herman "Jackrabbit" Johanson
post #32 of 50
Thread Starter 
That's a very cool idea, Pinelander. I'll bet the boy really soared with the help of his eagle eyes.
post #33 of 50
Yes, Nolo he did. He eventually was able to ski and snowboard on his own. Another device that I used when working with him and with others is Leki's Full Spectrum adjustable pole. With them I can extend them to their full length, using them as a bamboo pole, or I can adjust them to the proper length for me when free skiing.

We don't grow too old to play, we grow old because we stop playing - Herman "Jackrabbit" Johanson
post #34 of 50
Thread Starter 
I was putting up a tent with those segmented snap-together poles and wished I could come up with some purpose for them...any ideas, or is this just a great potential prop without a purpose other than keeping a tent from collapsing? So far my favorite prop from this thread is the hula hoop.
post #35 of 50
The teaching season is about to begin for a lot of us. What props do you use when teaching?
post #36 of 50
For the staring out skier who is having issues moving around on thier skis, a couple of strips of climbing skins applied to the bottom of the skis helps with movement.
I asked at at a local shop who did lots of backcountry work and they had a ton of scraps from trimming shorter skis that they had no problem donating my way.
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
frisbees (Warning: don't use a white frisbee, for obvious reasons).

Anyone that teaches kids knows how hard it is to get them to make turns on their own (as opposed to following your tracks). So, I carry a flourescent frisbee inside my coat. We will stop on an uncrowded slope, and throw the frisbee one at a time. The first kid will go to the frisbee, pick it up, and then throw it down the hill. The second has to make turns around me and the first kid, pick it up, and throw it. And so on until we're all tired of the game (you know kids, 10 minutes of any game or drill is usually enough at a time.) Do not allow anyone to be moving while the frisbee is in the air!!! And, they still must observe safety rules, such as watching for other skiers.

I also use the chairlift with more advanced skiers. (Or, at least, I use the shadows of the chairs.) chairlift slalom anyone? But, you can't cut the heads off any shadows while slaloming down the slope.
Warning: Danger Will Robinson.

Frisbee has lip on bottom. Lip digs into snow. Frisbee doesn't slide on snow.

Beginning skier skis to close to frisbee, trips on it, falls, and gets hurt.

Skier sues mountain. Judge asks skier why skier fell. Skier answers "tripped on frisbee". Judge asks skier would skier have fallen if frisbee wasn't there. Skier answers "no". Judge asks who put frisbee on snow. Skier answers "ski instructor employed by mountain".

Mountain loses.

End of true story.
post #38 of 50
My favorite gadget is plastic surveyors tape. I even did a drill with it in my level II exam and aced it.

Plastic surveyors tape is really soft and breaks easy. That makes it very safe as if it gets caught on anything, it will just break.

Instant slalom gate: Prior to skiing, prepare a bunch of 12" pieces of tape. Wrap one end several times with one width of duct tape. You now have a 2" hard thing with a 10" tail. When skiing, just punch a hole in the snow with your pole tip, place the duc-taped tip in the hole and stomp down. Repeat with each gate. You now have a set of gates you that can ski right over without tripping (see previous post).

Tushie pull: Break off a bunch of 6' pieces of tape. Give each student a piece. Have student hold one end of tape in one hand, cross it by behind them, and grab other end in other hand. Adjust so middle of tape rest against their lower bum and adjust tension so tape is pulling on bum when hands are moved forward into skiing position. Tell students to pull forward with hands while skiing to pull bum forward.

Just for fun with kids: Unroll a loooong piece of tape. Have each kid grab it one kid about every 15'. Have the whole line ski down holding the tape making turns and see how far they can go before someone breaks it. Tie it up and try again.

Pairs: Break off a 10-15' piece of tape. Have two kids side-by-side, one grab s it with left hand and other right hand. They try to ski turns next to each other in sync without breaking tape.

Knee tie: To keep knees apart and lose any A-framing. Position skis/boots proper distance apart. Tie a loop of tape around knees so that knees must be pressed outwards to maintain tension on tape. Ski medium radius turns. (Note, I'd avoid this with younger kids, under maybe 11-12. It's just too hard for them tying the tape to the correct tension. Gloves make it even harder. Unless you have just one or two kids, leave this one for teens and adults groups. It will take too long to get a whole bunch of younger kids set up right).
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
...

Beginning skier skis to close to frisbee, trips on it, falls, and gets hurt.
...

to put everyone's mind at ease, I would never use this exercise with beginners. I use it more like high level 4's to low level 6's. (But don't see where it's any more dangerous than cones or gates.)
post #40 of 50
Learn to Turn--- WOW-- Good stuff. An even safer tape---but not stronger (more fun perhaps)---would be the paper roll out decoration ribbon. WHITE... In case it drops. Colors for gates.
post #41 of 50
Overheard one of my instructors use this one with her group of 6-7 year-olds today.

"Everyone pick their favorite color. Mine is blue. As I ski down I'm going to pretend that I am a big blue crayon and "draw" a blue line in the snow. All of you will have to cover up my blue line with your favorite color. Marin, since you are coming down last, and your favorite color is pink, by the time we get down to the bottom our "line" should be all pink! Ready?"

All four kids got to take turns covering up everyone's colors, and the instructor laid down different "designs" for them to "color". I thought that was pretty slick.

Spag:
post #42 of 50
Thread Starter 
Brilliant! I wonder if she watched Sybervision. I loved how they showed a line of color flowing ahead of the skier down the mountain.
post #43 of 50
Laying colors in the snow with skis---right out of Captian Zembos (sp) book on kid training...Have used it and it works everytime.
post #44 of 50
Yeah! Talked more about it today and that's where she said she got it. Captain Zembo's. Can't believe I don't remember seeing that, but here it is right in front of me!

Spag
post #45 of 50
Mini cones and a rucksack with which to carry them.
My athletes/Clients love them up on random areas of a given piste.
This really trains them to learn lines outside of their own dictation, on variable terrain and condition.
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by william blake View Post
Mini cones and a rucksack with which to carry them.
My athletes/Clients love them up on random areas of a given piste.
This really trains them to learn lines outside of their own dictation, on variable terrain and condition.
I was just thinking of drilling a group to get a better turn shape using something like you suggest. Anybody see a down side in using some landscaping flags that come attached to a wire staff ? I did my sprinklers and have a bunch left over. I would cut them shorter so they can fit in my pockets or liners of my coat
post #47 of 50
I have had my school using Hula Hoops for beginner lessons for several seasons. Our beginner arena is well stocked with various sizes. Within 10 minutes on snow we link shuffle boot edge turns around a row of smaller 2'-dia hoops while rolling or tipping the feet towards the hoop, and changing the lead foot between them, left to go left, right to go right. Then repeat around larger ones with skis on, all as part of our extensive flat work activities. We have extended their use as we migrate up slope where we use the hoops as targets to turn around, moving them as needed to create a fan progressions or garlands or linked turns. All this is designed, and works really well, to visually convey to a beginning skier that skiing is about turning, and provide physical practice shaping rounder turns than the z'd ones single point targets seemed to promote.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
I was putting up a tent with those segmented snap-together poles and wished I could come up with some purpose for them...any ideas, or is this just a great potential prop without a purpose other than keeping a tent from collapsing? So far my favorite prop from this thread is the hula hoop.
Are those the poles that, when inserted into part of the tent, form an arc to hold up the roof? If so, you could use them to make an arc the skier passes through/under for vertical motion exercises.
post #49 of 50
Something I've found useful to get the idea of forward pressure/arch pressure across is to have the client stick a forefinger (or thumb if wearing mittens) down the front of a boot cuff and then "crush the finger" with the shin. Make sure the "crushing" involves a tiny bit of pain in both the shin and digit. Then remove the finger and "crush" it again without the pain . Then statically practice crushing while also feeling the arch inside the boot. Note that right-legged crushing puts the shin pressure at 10 o'clock if the toes are at 12, while left-legged makes it 2 o'clock. Practice with both feet/shins. Finally, make turns and think arch and shin of the outside leg to shape the turn finish. I usually use this drill while on the slope so we can make a variety of turns by varying the pressures involved.
post #50 of 50
Thread Starter 
Garry, I think your little flags would work great. If you play tennis, old tennis balls cut in half make nice friendly obstacles that you can stack in your knapsack or pockets.
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