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What to look for in a Personal Trainer

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
OK... I've been dieting and working out on my own since the ski season ended and promised myself that I was going to attack next season. I have dropped 25 pounds and want to shed 20 to 25 more by January 1. (I'm actually in a diet study) I have been working out at my local health club and doing mostly aerobic stuff. (Treadmill, bike, eliptical, & Less Mills group classes (RPM spinning class, Body Flow, and Bodypump) Been going three times per week and looking to increase to four. I want to make that fourth trip with a personal trainer and also start doing some weight training to increase strength and balance.

Since I want to work sport specific to skiing and most trainers in the flatlands don't train skiers, is there something I should look for in a personal trainer that will help me get the most out of my training? I think I'll start with ten sessions just to see how it goes. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Ty
post #2 of 14
First,good job in your weight loss efforts! The next 20 will no doubt be a little harder to shed. You are looking in the right direction with weight training.
IMHO you do not need to be looking into being "sport specific" at this time.
For the next 3 months find a trainer who will help you with strength & flexibilty. Learn the basic lifts ,squats,deadlift etc. Learn to do them properly. Strengthen your core ,every trainer will have there favorite core exercises. And stretching , legs ,hips,shoulders as well as some balance work.
Now is the time to build a foundation,in September start adding your ski specific work. By then you will have worked with a trainer for a while and both you & he/she will know a little more about your strength & weaknesses. Good luck.
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
You are looking in the right direction with weight training.

IMHO you do not need to be looking into being "sport specific" at this time.
Sounds like a great start, congratulations. I agree, "sport specific" is not necessary.

You hear it all the time: core, core, core. I also believe that strong "big" muscles are important for weight loss and that a skier can't go wrong with stronger legs. Improved strength has helped me with weight loss and maintanance. Weight training gives results yet it tends to be under-utilized.

With aerobic training, speed play or interval training has helped me. What is your aerobic program?
post #4 of 14
At the end of the season, I went to a PSIA seminar session on ski conditioning, and as Paul Jones suggests, the concept of strengthening the core muscles was emphasized.

The speaker (whose group Athletic Engineering works with the US Ski Team) encouraged us to do our exercises in such a way as to be aware of our "core" and working on staying in balance while performing the exercises.

They demostrated a number of exercises (squats, etc.) being done on a Bosu ball (if you don't know what one is, it's like half a rubber ball mounted on a round board) that required you to maintain balance with the core muscles first before trying to move and/or lift a weight.

Mike
post #5 of 14
What to look for? I'd lok for ripped abs.
post #6 of 14
So then the question becomes, what's core? Torso? I think it's more than that, but it sounds like abbs and the like.
post #7 of 14
First thing is she has to look good in spandex and a half-shirt. Oh wait, you mean to train with ...
post #8 of 14
The "core" muscles these trainers were talking about weren't the external muscles that we see (abs, obliques, etc.) but the muscles "inside" the body that stabilize the spine and help the bigger muscles that do the work do their job more effeciently.

Specifically, they wanted us to work on getting the multifidus (connect the vertebrae), transversus abdominis (a band of muscle supporting the abdominal wall) and the muscles of the pelvic floor working. Their argument was when these muscles fire properly (and in many people they don't) we end up bracing with the "big" muscles and working harder.

Mike
post #9 of 14
Just an observation, everybody I know that has worked with a trainer , the training for the lower body has included alot of dumb bell split squats. Split squats look and are grueling but probably are as good of a lower body workout as there is.
post #10 of 14
Shouldn't we learn to squat properly before attempting balancing on a bosu?
He could spend the next 3 months on just perfecting 'air squats' before even touching a weight or a bosu.
Your 'core' is any muscle that makes the connection between your upper & lower body and joins it into one unit.
post #11 of 14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsRur68fmVI
heres something that qualifies as a core strengthing
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
IMHO you do not need to be looking into being "sport specific" at this time.
For the next 3 months find a trainer who will help you with strength & flexibilty.
Learn the basic lifts ,squats,deadlift etc. Learn to do them properly.

Strengthen your core ,every trainer will have there favorite core exercises. And stretching , legs ,hips,shoulders as well as some balance work.
Now is the time to build a foundation,in September start adding your ski specific work.
Thanks for the positive comments...
Some more background on me... Ex-football player and even played some early in the college career until a strange injury and the fact that it was Division 3 made me think I should hang it up. I am very comfortable in a weight room and use to throw around some good iron. The last 15 years I have gone up and down the exercise cycles in my life but as I get older, I know I need to make a commitment. Skiing is helping me to now stay focused and keep at it. I want to get more serious about my skiing so I know I have to be more serious about my fitness level.

I am also clear on core strength and own a balance board and a couple of other core tools at the house.

I should have been more specific in my first question. I really have never used a personal trainer. My question falls in two parts as it pertains to a trainer.

1) I know that some traniners are better qualified than others. They can have different initials or credential after their names. What is the official seal of approval to know that I am getting a good trainer? If they have this degree or that degree? If they went through this certifying program? If they have good abbs? If they work for that crazy exercise chick on the reality show about trainers? Should they be a kinesiologist or a nutrionist or both? Do they need an advanced degree? (I saw a news show about how those with a bachelor's degree in those type of fields made the best trainers several years ago and that may be why I am seeking this advice)

How do I know my trainer is any good and can guide me in the right direction? Other than we get along and I feel good about them, what do I look for to know that I am getting a highly qualifed trainer?

I don't want a work out partner/spotter who I like to work me out and keep me motivated. I want someone that can help me work smarter and not harder.

2) My other concern relates my location and having a trainer that knows about what movements and exercises will help me most in skiing. Thus the sport specific part of the question. I fully agree with the core advice and also the flexibility.

I am also open to new ideas about exercise. 20 years ago nobody was doing pilates. I wish like heck I could have done that and some tai-chi when I was in high school playing football. I coach some HS football now on the side and have done some unique things with the team to build strength. I would love to find variations on different exercises that might work better for a skier than they would for say a football player. The video that loboskis posted is the kind of thing I am talking about. That looks tough but I can see the way it would need some core strength.

What I don't want is some gimmick or any wasted time in the gym!!

As far as my work out routine now. Work is busy so I get there when I can. About three to four times per week. I have been spinning (RPM class) about twice a week. I have also been going to Bodypump twice a week. (LessMills.com) I usually run on the treadmill one or two days a week. Some days I do a class and run or class and eliptical. Wednesdays, I usually do BodyPump and then straight to a spinning class because I take Thursday and Friday off due to other commitments. I was going to a BodyFlow class but have not been in about 6 weeks. I need to start going back. I do a little work in the machine room on abs and legs but no set routine.

Thanks very much for the advice and encouragement. I know this is a long response but I know someone here will be able to help get the info I need. Keep it coming and ski ya later.

Ty
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
OK.... Looked at a couple of bios of personal trainers at my gym. They have these different letters after their names for what ever certification they have. Is there one that I should really look for? Is something better than another?

Any help is appreciated!

Ty
post #14 of 14
CSCS-Certified Strength and Comditioning Specialist.These trainers cannot qualify for this exam unless they have a BS in the exercise feild.

Terry
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