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Good aggressive boot for a flat footed person..

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I happen to be flat footed, so my feet kill in most boots. I have a pair of Salomon ? (something onthe mid range), and they seem to be the best I've found so far. Even with them though, my feet kill, forcing me to take tyleno for pain (only way to make skiing fun). Next season will be here soon, so that said, what is the most comfortable boot by high end performance? Are Diablos any good? They seem to be quite popular around here...
post #2 of 17
Rise, the boot you need to get is the one that fits you best.
No one on here, or anywhere online, can tell you what that will be. You need to get yourself to a good bootfitter, and get them to put you in the right boots.
post #3 of 17
Not only can no-one make a recommendation online, the boot itself is less relevant to your arch shape than the footbed.

Find a boot in conjunction with an aftermarket footbed that fits.

Michael
post #4 of 17
I suggest you start by visiting a podiatrist. They'll be able to make some custom footbeds that will keep your feet in the correct position.

Then go and find some nice heat-moulded boots that fit.

I used to get pains down the outside of my right shin. So much so that, after two or three days of skiing, my shin was blue and it hurt so much that I had to stop. Now I have some footbeds that cant my feet outwards by 3.5 degrees on the left foot and 7 degree on the right foot and can ski comfortably with no pain at all.
post #5 of 17
Just my take: If you visit a podiatrist make sure that it is one that knows skiing requirements. A standard orthotic made for street shoe wear will not likely be suitable. A good bootfitter should be able to make a footbed that will likely work and fit you in an appropriate boot, as well.

I'd probably start with a good bootfitter first. If you need a podiatrist your bootfitter should know of one familiar with making orthotics for skiing. Epic Ski has a list of recommended bootfitters by state.
Good luck.
post #6 of 17
I too have flat feet and have had pleny of problems getting boots to fit me, as well as most shoes in general. After having owned several high end boots (usually for no more than a day, returned them all), the ones that came closest to fitting me well were the Head consumer race boots. Then with some shell grinding and a custom made foot bed, I am finally happy. If I were to do it all again, I would probably go with Heads again, but maybe move up to a plug boot and an injected foam liner; just go 100% custom right from the get go and not waste time, money, and avoid pain and aggravation.
post #7 of 17
Go straight to a shop with a great bootfitter. There's several in NH. I've heard great things about the guys in Plymouth http://www.bootfitters.com/shops/eas...richelsons.htm
and also the guys in N. Conway (forget their name, no link, but search this forum). I have duck feet, ankles rolled inward (pronate) severely. I was in agony in every type of boot. I went to Green Mountain Orthotic Lab at Stratton and now I'm skiing in Tecnica race plugs and love them...I never adjust my boots once I buckle them - I leave them buckled at lunch, even. It's all because of the custom orthotic/footbeds they made (podiatrists will argue that they're not orthotics...whatever). They put my feet in the proper position and prevent all of the problems my bad genetics caused. After that, it was very minor grinding to address "warm" spots. Best $250 I ever spent on ski gear.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
I too have flat feet and have had pleny of problems getting boots to fit me, as well as most shoes in general. After having owned several high end boots (usually for no more than a day, returned them all), the ones that came closest to fitting me well were the Head consumer race boots. Then with some shell grinding and a custom made foot bed, I am finally happy. If I were to do it all again, I would probably go with Heads again, but maybe move up to a plug boot and an injected foam liner; just go 100% custom right from the get go and not waste time, money, and avoid pain and aggravation.
Thanks Rich. For all of you reccomending customs, I have tried before, and its something with certian boots that causes the pain. I settled on the Salomons I have now because they were the least painful at the time (with custom).
post #9 of 17
If you are buying boots from a boot fitter and getting insoles, keep taking them back until they no longer hurt.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tief schnee View Post
If you are buying boots from a boot fitter and getting insoles, keep taking them back until they no longer hurt.
I agree. With shell modifications such as grinding, punching, shell stretching and any number of possible liner adjustments, just about any boot can be made to fit and be skied in without pain. The most important thing is to have the shell sized right and good footbeds, if needed, and a good bootfitter. You do not and should not have to live with pain.

In a perfect world you shop for boots untill you find the one that needs the least amount of adjustment. For some however, there is no boot that will not require a fair amount of work. A good bootfitter understands this. Good luck.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
I have duck feet, ankles rolled inward (pronate) severely. I was in agony in every type of boot. I went to Green Mountain Orthotic Lab at Stratton and now I'm skiing in Tecnica race plugs and love them...I never adjust my boots once I buckle them - I leave them buckled at lunch, even. It's all because of the custom orthotic/footbeds they made (podiatrists will argue that they're not orthotics...whatever). They put my feet in the proper position and prevent all of the problems my bad genetics caused. After that, it was very minor grinding to address "warm" spots. Best $250 I ever spent on ski gear.
Great definition of good footbeds.

The hard part is that different feet need different types of footbeds to accomplish this: off-the-shelf, custom, hard, soft, molded weighted/unweighted, etc. The key is to find a bootfitter that a) knows all the various options and their characteristics, b) cares, and c), is honest enough to tell you what you really need whether or not they carry it.

I too have very flat feet and have found that for both street shoes and ski boots, most off-the-shelf footbeds have too big an arch support to ever be comfortable for me.
post #12 of 17
I have orthotics for my running shoes made by a podiatrist. They told me to "break my feet in" gradually. Wear them for 2 hours for 3-4 days then double it to 4 hours for a week...it took almost 3 weeks before I could wear them all day in street shoes. Proper orthotics for a very flat pronating foot will be quite uncomfortable until your muscles adapt.
post #13 of 17
An orthotic designed for walking shoes or for running assumes a good deal of articulation, especially at the toes and other foot behavior. Foot behavior in a ski boot differs quite a bit from walking or running. So, if going to see a podiatrist, make sure its one who understands skiing and ski boots.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
Go straight to a shop with a great bootfitter. There's several in NH. I've heard great things about the guys in Plymouth http://www.bootfitters.com/shops/eas...richelsons.htm
and also the guys in N. Conway (forget their name, no link, but search this forum).
Dan Lewis at "Stan and Dan Sports" in North Conway, NH is first rate. I have very wide, very flat feet. No boot made fits me out of the box. Dan knows how to make them fit and how to make the footbeds you need. You won't get better service.
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post
An orthotic designed for walking shoes or for running assumes a good deal of articulation, especially at the toes and other foot behavior. Foot behavior in a ski boot differs quite a bit from walking or running. So, if going to see a podiatrist, make sure its one who understands skiing and ski boots.
That may be the problem, the orthodics were probably fitted the wrong way. Thanks for all the info guys, much appriciated.
post #16 of 17

Stan and Dan's in NH did a fantastic job for me, I'm a Hobbit... Wide, Flat paddle like feet that were always in agony until I went to Stan and Dan's. Time to go back, my boots are 15 years old now and need replacing.

 

I have Technica Boots and am very, very pleased

post #17 of 17

Hey, I have been on the other side of this thread (I did afterall coin the phrase boot demo day which no one can take away from me...dang I tried and I can't give it away) and everyone said "get thee to a boot fitter."  I don't disagree per se but....I found in my search for the perfect off the shelf boot the Atomic Hawx series to be as close as can be. Many will call me crazy, stupid, ignorant...ugly even...the list goes on but definitely try them on boot demo day.

 

Good luck and see you on the slopes.

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