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Looking for "professional advice"

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ok, so I have read all the posts on Toddler Skiing and I am curious what the professionals say....so...all you ski instructors....

- What is the best clothing for a 3 year old? Two piece or 1 piece?

- I know real muscle development has yet to occur, but is it really physically to early to start skiing? I know the amount of time they spend is very limited, but just curious what your thoughts are.

- What happens when you get outside and you have a totally freaked out kid? Do you still make them go? How do you handle the difficult ones?

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 12
1 or 2 piece is fine. Just make sure it's waterproof and warm.

How early to start is really up to the kid. I had one who was raring to go at just under three and another who wouldn't go until 5.

If your kid freaks out just call it a day.

Be prepared to go through all the hassle of preparing for a day of skiing. Getting all bundled up, booting the boots on etc putting the skis on and then having them be ready to go back in. Somedays will be like that and soem days they will actually ski for awhile. Just take it all in stride and keep it fun and relaxed.
post #3 of 12
One piece is harder in the bathroom. Something to keep in mind ...
post #4 of 12
Get him out in the snow and just play with him. Make snowballs. Roll around in the snow.
Watch the others as they ride on the nearest hill. Then ask him if he would like to try it.
Like VS says you have no idea how they will react. Most lessons at that age are half play and half teaching. Their attention span is very short and they tune you out and back again Or appear to. I have had good luck with 3 year olds and have had no luck with them.
Make it fun and don't expect to get them on skis. Allow them to feel what the environment is like.
Above all make sure they are protected from the elements or all they will think about is going back in. If properly dressed they will enjoy the snow like a big sand box.
I like the one piece as it has no openings and keeps them the most comfortable. If the under layers overlap and fit well then a two piece will do fine.
Remember the point of the experience is that they have fun not that they ski that day. If they have fun they will be asking you when they can go next and be a bit more prepared mentally. Possibly they will want to try later in the day. Maybe they ski right away ,maybe you come back another day. Leave it up to them.
post #5 of 12
Both mine were on the leash at age 3.

Both also wore 1 pieces.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiDork View Post
Both mine were on the leash at age 3.
be very judicious with the use of a leash. Every childrens' instructor has seen kids who have become dependent on a leash for speed control. Leashes should be used to stop the child in an emergency, not as a substitute for technique.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiDork View Post
Both also wore 1 pieces.
One-pieces are fine if they're going to be with you the whole time. But, if they're taking lessons, go for the jacket and ski pants. You ever seen a three or four-old trying to go to the bathroom (a skill most of them have just perfected) with a one-piece? Not to mention overheating and the need to take some layers off at lunchtime. Believe me, there's just no way of taking the top part of the one-piece off a child at lunchtime without the whole thing ending up around their ankles as soon as they get up to walk anywhere.
post #7 of 12
really remember that at 3 you wont get much skiing in for about 2 to 3 yrs if you do it by yourselves.As far as weather if your cold they are prob alllready frostbit
post #8 of 12
try this thread-

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=25528

to summarize my thoughts developed over 25 years in the business

1) warm
2) fun
3) fed

--read medmarkco's post in the other thread twice or 3 times before you embark on the journey
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
be very judicious with the use of a leash. Every childrens' instructor has seen kids who have become dependent on a leash for speed control. Leashes should be used to stop the child in an emergency, not as a substitute for technique.
A ski instructor friend gave us this advice about the leash: Just let them go as fast as they want to go and don't worry about turning. I actually used snowblades, it was a lot easier. Only 3 years old, at 4 they were fine without it. Of course, this was a supplement to the ski lesson program they were in at the mountain, not the only skiing they got.



Quote:
Originally Posted by milesandmiles
One-pieces are fine if they're going to be with you the whole time. But, if they're taking lessons, go for the jacket and ski pants. You ever seen a three or four-old trying to go to the bathroom (a skill most of them have just perfected) with a one-piece? Not to mention overheating and the need to take some layers off at lunchtime. Believe me, there's just no way of taking the top part of the one-piece off a child at lunchtime without the whole thing ending up around their ankles as soon as they get up to walk anywhere.
The ski program they were with never said anything negative about them having 1 pieces. To each his own, I guess
post #10 of 12
What ever is easiest for them to go to the bathroom. Mine used Bib and Jacket.

Mine started early. 1-2yrs of age. Mostly to get comfortable moving on the snow with the equipment. A run or two a day. I used dog leashes around the boots, to give them the feeling of skiing with the feet. I offered speed control and leg movement.

With my kids, having fun while skiing was paramount. I would finish the ski day while they wanted one more run. I would rather have them pout/cry to want to ski more. Then they still have energy to tell me how much fun they had and what they want to do next time.

Granted, I live a mile from the mountain and don't have to get my skiing in for the week. Also, if you are able to let your kids wear their skis and boots in the house/condo to get comfortable moving around in the equipment.

to your success,
Jon
Breckenridge, CO
post #11 of 12
We went for separates for bathroom facilitation. But the downside is the inevitable snow-up-the-jacket. We were in the Sierra, where it doesn't get bitterly cold, but depending on where you are, warmth may be paramount.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by redhead0209 View Post
Ok, so I have read all the posts on Toddler Skiing and I am curious what the professionals say....so...all you ski instructors....

- What is the best clothing for a 3 year old? Two piece or 1 piece?

- I know real muscle development has yet to occur, but is it really physically to early to start skiing? I know the amount of time they spend is very limited, but just curious what your thoughts are.

- What happens when you get outside and you have a totally freaked out kid? Do you still make them go? How do you handle the difficult ones?

Thanks in advance!
Mine all started just under 4 as well. First seasons were more like getting them used to the snow and had them in lessons only for a couple of time. I didn't expect much so I want to save the big money for later years. Although it wasn't always planned, things worked out really well for us.

As for a appropriate outter layer, separates worked out well for us. Like a few other had mentioned, potty choirs are the main concern here. Doing it for your own is one thing but having others (i.e. ski instructors) to put up with that (especially when it's messy) is just not right. I feel more so now knowing how much they already do for the little pay that they get. Make sure that the coat and pants are big and long enough so that snow doesn't get into the inner layers.

Lastly, when your kid freaks out, he/she should probably take a break. Either try again later if you're skiing with him/her or have him stay in the lesson and continue playing with the other kids and the instructor (on and off the hill). If he/she is pulled out of a lesson, he/she is less likely to return, at least soon. If repeated attempts fail, bag it for the year and try again next season.
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