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Ma request for fun. - Page 5

post #121 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

...then why did Paul Jones quote glytch my mind hurts.
I just continued on from where he left off.

BTW, I still think that her skiing is pretty good. You just don't see alot of women taking on terrain like that. Not to take anything away from the many fine female skiers across the country, there are many who ski better. But, this woman holds her own.
post #122 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
BTW, I still think that her skiing is pretty good. You just don't see alot of women taking on terrain like that. Not to take anything away from the many fine female skiers across the country, there are many who ski better. But, this woman holds her own.
You should see my wife ski. Bob, BWPA, care to comment?

I wish I had 1/2 her skillz!
post #123 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
How is it best to handle a student who thinks he's the s**t and when they ski you see so many issues you have no problem knowing where to begin.
Then they say they want to shred the gnar and would like some instruction.

They pay for this yet they deny the need for proper correction which is best done and mastered on easier terrain and then taken to other parts of the mountain.
I am sure many have this situation come up pretty regulary . I would think you address the positional , balance needs and then work on building proper movement in balance. All of this would be done on easy terrain until the user gains ownership of the skill necessary.

It seems like a blockage of the path to better skiing. .
Best not to "shut them down" immediately - they'll tune out. Make sure they are paired properly with the "right instructor" and then roll with the punches as long as they aren't a danger to themselves or others. Then, show 'em how it's done with as athletic a line as they want to take, but also with the ability to add, take away, or manipulate any part of the line down - that there is more than one way to ski the same terrain. When they ask about a particular movement that interests them - say when we're finished here, we're going over to XYZ and we're going to work on a few things.
post #124 of 137
Here's an idea- edit the video so that it starts after the hop turns. It really doesn't matter what a skier does to get through that little section, as long as they are comfortable and in control. But it is only about 1/20th of the run. Then maybe it can be a useful conversation.
post #125 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
I'm not being disrespectful, I am being truthful. I actually have characterized her skiing quite accurately...
I don't agree.

In an earlier thread you characterized her skiing as "mediocre". Here's a definition of mediocre:

mediocre - moderate to inferior in quality;

Despite some technique flaws, she is far from inferior in quality. She could *certainly* benefit from some improvements in her technique, but if she's inferior then you're comparing her to an incredibly high standard. She's skiing a difficult line aggressively and with great balance. She has very good control over her skis, her speed, and her direction.

Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post
...and in fact her equipment does factor into her peformance. She and many others have been gamed by the ski co's.
I do agree with you here.

I think she *could* learn a lot about how to make better turns by getting on some skis she can bend. Something shorter, curvier, and softer might give her a better feel for what the skis can do if she lets them, rather than what she can do to the skis. If she's only in her fifth season at Snowbird, however, I doubt that she's ready yet to abandon all the fun she's having off-piste in favor of working on turn drills on the groomers. My guess is that evolution will come over time, but not yet.

I doubt that it's the ski companies that have gamed her, though, I suspect it's her buddies. At her age, there's every bit as much testosterone in the rippin'-girl sorority as there is in the bro-brah crowd. She's got to have big skis to avoid being classified as a girly-girl.

Quote:
Originally Posted by volklskier1 View Post

If Instructors are unable to differentiate then how in the world can the public.
I would ask the same question of you. You're stating very distinctly that this girl's skiing is mediocre. If this is what you think is mediocre, then the public is going to be pretty confused. I would suggest that if 97% of the ski-lesson-buying public were to have watched that girl's run in person, they would have been willing to pay a premium to an instructor who would promise to help them to "ski like that".

I think she's pretty darn good and I sure wish I could have skied that well at 28.
post #126 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post

You should see my wife ski. Bob, BWPA, care to comment?
No need to ask me. Here's the proof:





edited to add that I think her poles are too long.

(that's a joke)
post #127 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
No need to ask me. Here's the proof:



Nice pic Bob. I love the way her body position supports the edge angles. Lonnies wife ,huh ?
Hey Lonnie. Did she teach you all she knows or just enough so you can ski with her? :

post #128 of 137
To every thing turn, turn, turn; there is a season turn, turn turn...

OK I don't know much, but i'm bored so i'm gonna offer my opinion anyhow

someone said it in a post above: he who has the whole package is king.

VS and BW seem to be projecting extremes onto each other. It appears that BW thinks VS is only interested in making poodle turns and is jealous of the youthful, free spirited balls-out skiing BW purports to be doing with the big boys. VS thinks BW is using his youth to mask his own deficiencies and doesn't want to acknowledge the importance of superior technical skill because he hasn't perfected his own yet and that he's a slave to fashion by sporting long, fat skis as a symbol of his membership in the hot sh!t club.

It's all a matter of degree. I'd bet neither of those view points is fair or correct, but that they both have a little element of truth and that's what's making both of them so defensive.

GarryZ: the answer to your question is really very easy in theory maybe tougher in practice. You take said student to the gnar, you observe how they struggle in it. You ask them if they'd like to (fill in the blank here - for instance, ski that chute with greater fluidity and less stop and start) and then you tell them, "to do that we're going to do some things on easier terrain." Then you perform your magic and then (this is important) you take them right back to the gnar and you prove to them what small improvement you've made in their ability to reach the stated goal. The big - huge really - mistake many instructors make IMO, and this might likely include VS, is to take a paternalistic point of view and insist that you know better and zey must (in a German accent) do these drills on the groomed until they've satisfied some form of unattainable perfection and as a result they succeed in doing nothing but bore their students right into the mind set that BW articulated and that so incensed VS. (having been the student in this scenario, i know it can be so. luckily, i've also had the gift of great instructors who managed to improve my skiing without damaging my spirit. thank you RG)

Each approach has its place and time. IMHO, you need to balance both to be king as an either an instructor or as a skier.
post #129 of 137
Garry, I think the best approach is to discuss with the student what you'd like to work on and see how they feel about it. IF they indicate that they really want to go straight to the big run, then so be it. But there is no harm and trying to be tactfully honest and in trying to offer to them what you think will serve them best. I think that most good skiers, if you give them a good reason, are more than willing to spend a couple hours on an easier run.
post #130 of 137
Mom has the right approach to Garry's question. Another tactic is to
ski the challenging terrain but pause when the run starts to mellow and throw in a demo or drill. I don't think anybody has runs that are hairy all the way to the chair. (Hey, it worked on me...)
post #131 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
No need to ask me. Here's the proof:





edited to add that I think her poles are too long.

(that's a joke)
I thought Lonnie was kidding Nice.
post #132 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
I thought Lonnie was kidding Nice.
no lonnie wasnt not kidding, Laure indeed rips. Arc to arc, dynamic skiing anytime, anyslope, and conditions,anywhere, it would get praise from any instructor or any skier for the matter. Among the best rec skiers I have seen, male or female. More words I could use to describe it, precise, controlled, flowly, elect, elect. Alot of "hotshots" on here including me can learn from watching her.

Mom I really like your post. I think you should be more volkl sometimes.
post #133 of 137
Bump.

Here's the thread that BWPA was talking about in the other thread (questioning whether posting a video for MA was worth it).

The only thing this thread makes me want to do is ski with BWPA to see if he's as good as he says he is.

I remember seeing him ski 3 or 4 years ago at Pico when he was in his level 2 test, but I didn't really get that good of look to form an opinion. I would be anxious to see how much he's improved since then, though...
post #134 of 137
I think her boots need work
post #135 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roto View Post
I think her boots need work
please tell me you are not serious....
post #136 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
please tell me you are not serious....
To truly back up the statement I would have to ski with her. She seems athletic enough, moves well enough. But it does look like, when she gets into comfy rhythm, which tells me "this is home" for her, her stance may demand some movements that she would enjoy changing.

In my experience, skiers naturally "do what is required" of them by their eq. Often, because of eq. setup, teaching or coaching won't stick. If a real good athlete is in a boot that would benefit from some small, but important adjustments, make the small, important boot adjustment, and over time the athlete-skier will also make the adjustments. These comments are not oriented around getting her to ski "like an instructor," either.

That said. If I skied with this woman I wouldn't be running around trying to improve her skiing. I would be enjoying the experience for what is.

Even in situations when hired to coach accomplished skiers, I just ski alot while we get to know each other. I offer coaching when they ask for it in one way or another. By waiting for an invite, and using the time to get to know someone, much can be accomplished in a short time with little input vs. trying to tell someone who knows how to ski, how to ski.

If I edited my original boot comment it would read

"I think she might benefit from a little hardgood stance-work."
post #137 of 137
I've seen my skiing in the steeps before and it looks about the same. It's tiring to muscle your way down a run like that. If she ever learns how to use the skis to help out her legs, can you have her teach me?
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