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Instructor pay rates

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I was just curious. It seems that my mountain pays a lot less than other mountains for the level of service we provide. I work in the Childrens ski school and we start off by making $9/lesson and it goes up $1 a year until you reach $12 a lesson where it then levels off, lessons are in groups that can be up to 6 kids by yourself and run for a hour and half, there are two group lessons a day. we can also take out private lessons where we get $2 above our group rate and that lesson runs for a hour, there are 3 spots for privates a day.

i was just curious if this compares to other resorts.

Thanks
post #2 of 23
PM sent
post #3 of 23
Check out the SEARCH feature, and you shall find the answer to your question, grasshopper!

On no less than a dozen threads has this been discussed...

If you believe you are underpaid, either find another resort, or another field of endeavour.

Good Luck!
post #4 of 23
If you look carefully, a lot of resorts actually post their beginning pay scales buried several pages down under employment opportunities.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwitchSki View Post
I was just curious. It seems that my mountain pays a lot less than other mountains for the level of service we provide. I work in the Childrens ski school and we start off by making $9/lesson and it goes up $1 a year until you reach $12 a lesson where it then levels off, lessons are in groups that can be up to 6 kids by yourself and run for a hour and half, there are two group lessons a day. we can also take out private lessons where we get $2 above our group rate and that lesson runs for a hour, there are 3 spots for privates a day.

i was just curious if this compares to other resorts.

Thanks
Here, you get minimum wage. After you get your Level 1, you get minimum wage. After a few years, you can get up to minimum wage.

We're only in it for the money.
post #6 of 23
switchski,

That rate seems to be close to the rates around my neck of the woods. Do you get a pay increase for each level of PSIA certification?

Rw
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwitchSki View Post
I was just curious. It seems that my mountain pays a lot less than other mountains for the level of service we provide. I work in the Childrens ski school and we start off by making $9/lesson and it goes up $1 a year until you reach $12 a lesson where it then levels off, lessons are in groups that can be up to 6 kids by yourself and run for a hour and half, there are two group lessons a day. we can also take out private lessons where we get $2 above our group rate and that lesson runs for a hour, there are 3 spots for privates a day.

i was just curious if this compares to other resorts.

Thanks
You may be getting below the minimum wage depending on your state. You are making $6 per hour but that is just for the lesson time. Once you factor in showing up for lineups and getting assigned to a class, prepping your equipment, waiting for late parents at pickup etc you are really getting ripped off. File a complaint with your states department of labor. It is illegal for them not to pay you for this time
post #8 of 23
$200 ... for clinic to learn to be an instructor

$200 ... for the jacket once you are so honored (managed to crawl in)

$150 ... for other uniform accessories like white shirts and black pants

$6.25 per hour for those hours you teach on snow.

$0.00 for sitting in the mandatory meetings (rah rah sessions) where the boss rags on about how to sell more lesson packages.

$0.00 to attend the annual refresher so you can teach again next year

Looking at your check for $38.42 for a weekend of instruction when the gas to get the truck to and from the hill was $48.50 ..... Priceless .. :
post #9 of 23
Yuki, you have to know how to work it...many of my fellow ski instructors are college girls, and they need rides to the mountain, too.
post #10 of 23
Harry, you have to know that I married a Norwegian. There are two things (perhaps genetic?), that they can do; ski and shoot.

post #11 of 23
Hey, but it's all about the gas money...
post #12 of 23
Scuse' me sir! Does this Spyder come in Kevlar? No, no, not GoreTex, that's as in Kevlar .... with a K ...
post #13 of 23
PA does not pay minimum wage to "seasonal employees" . Yet in Baltimore, you cannot hire a "seasonal employee" (if you will) for less than $14.00 an hour now. How the world has changed.
post #14 of 23
PA area paid instructors bare bones mimimum of $5.15 and then gave a raise to $5.25 when the mimimum went up to that.

There is a wierd remote "clause" in your hiring "agreement" that places you in the category of "independent contractor". This allows them great latitude in avoiding most labor laws.
post #15 of 23
State by state the rules/laws vary but in NY Ski Instructors are classified as Teachers and therby exempt from minimum wage or overtime. This means the mountains are paying bupkis for workers comp on Ski Instructors (how many teachers ever get hurt in the classroom) yet that is the one department that puts in the most workers comp claims each year.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
PA area paid
Is that "a PA area" vs "the PA area"?
post #17 of 23
The pay rates where I work are actually pretty good, at least compared to what you all are claiming.
Jackets are provided, pay for mandatory training, higher rates for requests (typical for all areas I think), steep discounts at other Intrawest resorts, pay for showing up at lineups (minimal, but it adds up). I actually come out ahead on the deal at the end of the year. Not bad $ for a part timer, but you do have to work for it.
post #18 of 23
Boy I remember those days. While working at a small area in CA. Fortunately the pay has increase. About 5x-9x what was made in Min Wage back then. It has taken years and many levels of certification, and the realization that one should have other "better" ways of earning $$ to support their teaching habit.

As Vail Snopro, said, search the topic on the Epic ski search.

all the best,
Jon
post #19 of 23
Sorry for any confusion. An area in PA that I worked at started us at the minimum wage of $5.15 an hour.

They then held a "grand ceremony" at line up later that year to announce they were giving us a raise. Ten cents an hour! They had all the senior staff clapping and cheering in this big celebratory love fest and tossed out mini candy bars.

The next day, the paper had an article about Pennsylvania hiking the minimum wage to $5.25 an hour. The thing that burned me was that they acted like they were doing this out of benevolent love. Fact was, they had no choice.

Heck the local 7-11 (quick mart type place), down the road had big signs up for counter help at $7.00 to start.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Sorry for any confusion. An area in PA that I worked at started us at the minimum wage of $5.15 an hour.

They then held a "grand ceremony" at line up later that year to announce they were giving us a raise. Ten cents an hour! They had all the senior staff clapping and cheering in this big celebratory love fest and tossed out mini candy bars.

The next day, the paper had an article about Pennsylvania hiking the minimum wage to $5.25 an hour. The thing that burned me was that they acted like they were doing this out of benevolent love. Fact was, they had no choice.

Heck the local 7-11 (quick mart type place), down the road had big signs up for counter help at $7.00 to start.
You've been complaining about instructor pay and working conditions for years. If I worked a minimum wage job and they treated me as poorly as you've described (ad nauseum), I'd walk away before lunch.
It's time for you to get over it.

BK
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache View Post
State by state the rules/laws vary but in NY Ski Instructors are classified as Teachers and therby exempt from minimum wage or overtime. This means the mountains are paying bupkis for workers comp on Ski Instructors (how many teachers ever get hurt in the classroom) yet that is the one department that puts in the most workers comp claims each year.
i ot so sure that's right. Where I work, supervisors are trained on how to comply with the minimum wage rules (although they seem to skip the part about paying for training, line-up and standby time). And they are obviously concerned about workers' comp, which is costly for all employers in NY.
If instructors were concerned, they could probably get the NYS Labor Dept to make them pay us for liine-ups and training, but then they would probably just fire us. For me the situation is about perfect: I'll do any job they ask me to do, but if it's not fun, I never give them the opportunity to ask me again.

BK
post #22 of 23
He asked. I answered.

Is there a problem with a dead on honest answer to a question.

If you are more fortunate, hey, I'm glad for you. People who are about to go into instructing need to know some of the industry practices.

You wouldn't be one of those instructors who have been paid a bounty for bringing in an instructor like at the area I described above would you? You got $50.00 if you recruited someone.

As long as they ask, I'll continue to answer.
post #23 of 23
Yuki I dont why you do it if it cost you money, I love teaching but the minute it cost me money is the minute I am done teaching full time.
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