New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

fly fishing

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
anyone else here do it? i'm just getting started... took a "class" in college called Literature of the River, and we basically just fished and read Buddhist water sutras. terrible, I know.
post #2 of 13
I've fly fished (dry flies for trout in streams) longer than I've been skiing, which is a long time. Siddartha found enlightenment on a stream bank.
post #3 of 13

Fly Fishing

HOOK ON WINTER. Welcome to fly fishing. Been doing it for 40 years long before it became popular. Google the net and buy or library some books (with diagrams and pictures). Learning how to cast is best done with a friend or a person that alread can cast.

Join a fly fishermans club. Most are pretty good, a few are full of eliteist snobs (avoid). BIG money has really almost taken over the sport. I know flyfisherman that only fish with a guide - no pride in learning it themselves just spending the money. Some of these clowns are analogous to the Squaw Valley babe with 3,000 dollars worth of clothes etc. and can't ski a lick.

I don't know where you are exactly but don't limit yourself to just ie.. trout fishing. I have fly fished for 1)blugill and crappie 2) rainbow, brown, cutthroat trout, 3)largemouth and smallmouth base 4)pike 5) steelhead 6)salmon 7) dorado.

Fly fishing is a lot of fun and very self rewarding, been tying my own flies for almost 40 years a real quiver of feathers I own.

Be glad to help a fellow epic member get started, any questiones etc. you can PM me anytime. Have some older reels and maybe line etc. can sell cheap if you want.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
BIG money has really almost taken over the sport. I know flyfisherman that only fish with a guide - no pride in learning it themselves just spending the money. Some of these clowns are analogous to the Squaw Valley babe with 3,000 dollars worth of clothes etc. and can't ski a lick.
I noticed this happening right around the time "A River Runs Through It" came out. Thankfully the trend seems to have died down.

HOW - whatever you do, don't freak out about getting an insanely expensive setup. Personally, I don't like the new ultra fast tight loop rods and a reel is pretty much just a line holder to me. Same with waders - Hodgman breathables work just fine. Learning to tie is very useful, although summer isn't exactly the time you want to spend hours behind a bench.
post #5 of 13
Did you know…
According to Wikipedia, baseball legend Ted Williams (who served as a flight instructor & combat-tested USMC pilot during two wars) was an avid and expert fly fisherman and deep-sea fisherman. He spent many summers after baseball fishing the Miramichi River, in Miramichi, New Brunswick, Canada. Williams was named to the International Game Fish Association Hall of Fame in 2000. Some opined that Williams was a rare individual who during his lifetime might have been one of the best in the world in three different disciplines: baseball hitter, fighter jet pilot, and fly fisherman. Shortly after Williams's death, conservative pundit Steve Sailer called him "possibly the most technically proficient American of the 20th Century, as his mastery of three highly different callings demonstrates."
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
Did you know…
According to Wikipedia, baseball legend Ted Williams (who served as a flight instructor & combat-tested USMC pilot during two wars) was an avid and expert fly fisherman and deep-sea fisherman. He spent many summers after baseball fishing the Miramichi River, in Miramichi, New Brunswick, Canada. Williams was named to the International Game Fish Association Hall of Fame in 2000. Some opined that Williams was a rare individual who during his lifetime might have been one of the best in the world in three different disciplines: baseball hitter, fighter jet pilot, and fly fisherman. Shortly after Williams's death, conservative pundit Steve Sailer called him "possibly the most technically proficient American of the 20th Century, as his mastery of three highly different callings demonstrates."
Years ago, Sports Illustrated ran a beautiful profile on Williams titled "Ted Williams on the Miramichi." According to the author, who spend some time with Williams at his place on the river, he got passionate about flyfishing when he started working for Sears as the head of their so-called Sports Advisory Board (remember when the higher-quality Sears-brand sporting goods were all "Ted-Williams approved"?).

Anyway, he got to travel around in that capacity in the early 60s testing out rifles, tentpegs, flyrods, mosquito nets, and all that. After he left Sears, he bought a camp on the Miramichi and applied the same intensity to fishing and flytying that he did to hitting a baseball. I guess he was a superb caster.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
I know flyfisherman that only fish with a guide - no pride in learning it themselves just spending the money. Some of these clowns are analogous to the Squaw Valley babe with 3,000 dollars worth of clothes etc. and can't ski a lick.
So Team Orvis is in the spotlight?

I'm pretty much a dirtbag flyfisherman myself. My waders are full of Gink stains and Aquaseal patches, and one of my reels is held together with JB Weld; but if I had the disposable funds and I was fishing some big, unfamilar water, I'd spring for a guide without a second thought. I mean, even if these guys are rookies who are guiding for a single season, they still spend all day, every day on the river. And if you get some seasoned guide who isn't a complete misanthrope, it's like tapping into a gold mine. He will know the hatches, the good water, the flies that are working. If I could tap into that just for one day, and then go out on my own the rest of the time, it would be well worth it.

But I guess hiring a guide does seem like an extravagance in some situations. I mean, if you live near a great river, why not just go down some fine day and try to figure it out yourself? There's no memory like that first trout that you catch on a fly without anyone else telling you where to cast or what kind of fly to use.

(In the interest of full disclosure, being a flyfishing guide is still my dream summer job.)

There are some waters, though, especially in your neck of the woods, Pete, that are just plain meant to be fished in solitude or with a close friend: Kelly Creek, Cayuse Creek, North Fork of the Clearwater, North Fork Coeur d'Alene, St. Joe, and so on. I mean, if you can't figure them out, it's time to go back to the tying bench or something. That sort of fishing -- big cutthroats in beautiful alpine surroundings -- is about as good as it gets IMO.

Anyway, I'm going out for shad on the lower Umpqua (my home river) early Sunday morning. We've got smallies in the summer, shad right now, steelhead in the winter, chinook in the spring and fall, coastal cutthroat in the fall in the small tributaries, and coho....and the occasional striped bass too.

HookedOnWinter, what these other guys said. Flyfishing clubs are a great resource. If you're in an area that has a lot of interest in the sport, then one or more of these clubs may hold a annual, public Flytying event, Fly Swap or Flyfishing Expo that you can check out. These are typically held in the late winter or early spring. Also, most clubs, a lot of community colleges, and some state Departments of Fish and Game will sponsor no- or low-cost flyfishing classes. It might be a long weekend or it might be a couple of months worth of Saturdays, but that would be another resource.

And if you haven't already done so, read The Book before you see The Movie (A River Runs Through It, that is). And check out a few John Gierach books from the library to get a sense of what it feels like to fall in love with this lifetime sport.
post #8 of 13

Fly Fishing

Gnarlito. Yep I forgot shad. Sac ramento Flying Fish Club used to have a Shad Day contest on the Yuba River. Biggest and most. One day in the early 70's I caught 89 shad and lost the contest, the winner caught 107. That was a hell of a day, sore arm and all. Great fun, great memories.

I live overlooking the St. Joe river and am very close to some great fishing. As soo n as the Joe comes down (damned snow) I'll be out on it a lot.
post #9 of 13
Join your local chapter of Trout Unlimited. It's inexpensive, you usually get some free flies, they have free outings, instruction and seminars and the other members can steer you to deals on equipment. You'll also get the conservation side of the sport. It's akin to having a free guide.

You can be a ski bum and a trout bum!
post #10 of 13

This is one activity..........

Quote:
Originally Posted by HookedOnWinter View Post
anyone else here do it? i'm just getting started... took a "class" in college called Literature of the River, and we basically just fished and read Buddhist water sutras. terrible, I know.
where for me now......testing new flyrod performance..on pristine water...and observing nature is as good as it needs to get....

Steve
post #11 of 13

Yikes....another angler....

HOW!

If yous an ole folk you need yer glasses to put on them gnats....

Are you creek/stream /river fly fishing with a 3-6wt? Saltwater fly fishing with a 7-12wt....or a 13-15wt. for sails?

Find josef a good Knotty Book, and learn to tie knots so you wont be at the mercy of profiteering shops.

The pleasure of the sport is in the focus and technique. If I'm not on the water, I'm practicing casting on a nice grass field...this time of year football fields are perfect...learn all typs of casts when you are NOT disturbing fish.....

Reading water comes with experience.

There is a ton of fine fly fishing literature out there....you probably know the classics...here is a one of my favorites, Thomas McGuane, "The Longest Silence," Vintage. paperback.

The net is loaded with fishing links, find places to fish nearby!
post #12 of 13

...Ahh yes, it's Mainiac...

...another flyline-thowin' nut.......
post #13 of 13
Fly is Zen. Another excuse to go to the mountains. Much closer to hunting than any other form of fishing. When you have hooked and landed you have won. Release and let the fish go on its way. An even greater sense of achievement if using a fly that you have designed and tied yourself.

Always a sense of Hemingway standing in a mountian stream, fly rod in hand (flask of single malt and a good cuban optional) absorbed in the surroundings.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Sports