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Bad Habits

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Just of curiosity, what are some people's bad ski habits, that they KNOW they have, but somehow, still don't get rid of them?

I have two that are both related to an early childhood fear of crossing my tips. 1) I sometimes will "skate" through long turns, using a large step uphill (pushing on the downhill ski) Weirdly enough, this actually works well. 2.) I tend to glance at my tips every few turns, just to make sure they're there!!
post #2 of 23
My bad habit is that when I ski, I end up the next morning in some strange bed with some strange woman!

Happens ALL the time!

Tell me how to STOP!


BTW, I was recently asked "is that a TERRAPIN in your pocket or are you just gald to see me!"

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ December 05, 2001 07:41 PM: Message edited 2 times, by Zeus ]</font>
post #3 of 23
I crunch up my toes when things get steep.
I have to relax my feet in oder to use them more effectively. Ski with the feet...
My boots will be custom fit for me this year. Hopefully I won't be able to curl my toes anymore.
post #4 of 23
Terrapin -

That fear of crossing your tips is well founded! Occasionally I have caught an edge and crossed my tips, but would somehow always manage to very quickly uncross them. Let me tell you...it is NOT pretty if you do not get them uncrossed! I ended up with compound tibia and fibula fractures not too long ago (which required a total of 4 surgeries and much hardware to repair), after just a little edge catching & tip crossing at a high rate of speed! Yeah, my bindings released, but the damage was done. :

My ongoing bad habit is too much arm movemet across my body as I initiate my turns. I think its a hangover from gate running/racing. Hard habit to break.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ December 05, 2001 09:32 PM: Message edited 1 time, by Serenity ]</font>
post #5 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Zeus:
My bad habit is that when I ski, I end up the next morning in some strange bed with some strange woman!
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's not so bad.
Normal women are overrated.
post #6 of 23
Waking up in the morning with a strange woman? Kind of like the old country tune... Left the bar at 2 with a 10- woke up at 10 with a 2!

Me? Half way through a turn and lifting inside ski and finding I slam it right back down. Too much weight on inside ski in the first place during turn. Corrected this so now it's on to other things... many other things I'm sure. One is failing to say, "I mean to do that," when I crash and burn. Another is not putting price tags on the items in my yardsale!

Ever notice, when standing at the top of a steep run... the longer you stand there, thinking about it, the more scarederer ya git? Now I just growl and attack the hill and do my turns. Then my brain says, "Why am I doing THIS?"
post #7 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Serenity:
...it is NOT pretty if you do not get them uncrossed! I ended up with compound tibia and fibula fractures not too long ago (which required a total of 4 surgeries and much hardware to repair), after just a little edge catching & tip crossing...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
LOL!!! Now that's gonna help Terrapin get over his fear!
post #8 of 23
Terrapin,

My Holiday gift to you is the following suggestions regarding your "bad" habits.

1: there is no need to look down at your tips, so eyes forward to the location of your next turn.

2: Your skis are crossing because you have lightened your tips by getting in the back seat [leaning back, not centered on your skis.] Chances are this is happening when you are making a turn, so you look down to make sure the skis haven't crossed. this of course takes your focus off of where your next turn should be, and your turns are therefore not smooth and efficient.

Suggestion: maintain at all times a little forward pressure on your boot tongue [ what you will feel is some slight pressure against the shins of your legs.] Conscienciously do this until it becomes an ingrained habit.

This will do several things:
It will imporve confidence in your turns. You will no longer feel the need to look down.
Ultimately your skiing will improve, and do so dramatically.
post #9 of 23
I'm sure I have a whole list of bad ski habits but I really don't know what they are. I do know what helps me turn the skis. Foremost stay balanced and relaxed.
I make as few movements as possiable to start my turn.
Once I have rolled my ankles and put the skis on edge I make a slight pedal-pressure movement on my downhill ski.
Then when I am into the early part of the turn I look or turn my head towards the direction I am headed. This helps to block my upper body against the slope and gives me a slight upper body rotation. And the last and most important is to smile. It's got to be fun,right.
post #10 of 23
Leanin' back! I've done it all my life and i just can't shake the habit. I notice it a little when i'm feeskiing, mainly in the bumps, but mostly when i'm in a race coarse. As i get further and further through the coarse the further and further i find myself on my tails. I keep telling myself to put my hands forward, but it never lasts.
I even freeski overemphasizing keeping my hands forward, but the habit still remains. Anyboy have any suggestions?
post #11 of 23
LB1: Flex your ankles.
post #12 of 23
Bad habits (that I'm aware of) mostly when I'm in over my head

1) I will drop the up hill hand back (placing me further back on my skis than I should be and using my upper body to bring the skis around)
2) Will straighten the down hill leg digging in the edge to scrub speed (I should complete the turn).
post #13 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lbrother1:
Leanin' back! I've done it all my life and i just can't shake the habit. I notice it a little when i'm feeskiing, mainly in the bumps, but mostly when i'm in a race coarse. As i get further and further through the coarse the further and further i find myself on my tails. I keep telling myself to put my hands forward, but it never lasts.
I even freeski overemphasizing keeping my hands forward, but the habit still remains. Anyboy have any suggestions?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LBrother: A couple of basic thoughts come to mind: 1) Consider having a first rate boot fitter complete an assessment of your boot fit, boot/binding ramp angle, boot's forward lean-ie too far forward will put you in the back seat to compensate,and side to side alignment; and 2) snow-blade practice, (believe it or not)!!!!!!! I can tell you many stories of students and instructors, who just couldn't get out of the back seat. Then we put them on snow blades and in only a matter of a few runs they were either lying in the snow or skiing in the first balanced and centered stance in their lives.And you'll never guess where the progression started. The wedge turn and on through the progression until they reached dynamic parallel turns again. Then back to their own skis using the same progression. Finally it should be noted that we used many exercise lines from a book written by Ellen Post Foster,(former National Demo Team member)-The Art of Carving. If you haven't read it, you should. It's one of the clearest and most user friendly books on skiing I have ever seen. By the way it has an accompanying video as well. Good Luck.

:

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ December 06, 2001 09:07 PM: Message edited 1 time, by whtmt ]</font>
post #14 of 23
I tend to spray snowboarders when they are on the lift, is this a bad habbit though?? Long story, but on a day when you can peel up enough snow you can easily hit the lift in some low areas dont worry i only do it if i know the riders, im not a menace to society.

Now for being serious:
I used to always watch my skis when i was carving, very bad, gates come pretty fast when yer looking at the ground. Catch some in the face and you'll understand this.

I curl my toes periodically too, but sometimes im just scared to death. I wasnt aware that it affected my skiing a whole lot when i did it... Can anyone add more to this??

I get kinda carried away sometimes and try to jump off everything, and have gone too big a few times. That is one reason id ont ski on look bindings with an axial heel cuz if i make a big mistake i land in the back seat and land on my bindiings, obviously not releasing them, but gives you one hell of a cramp, you know where.

I spray my dad and younger brother at every chance possible; they have this habbit too when its me ahead of them.

Eat an orange on the lift and throw the peels in the woods... never do that withstuff that animals cant eat though, and that is one thing that agrivates me if people who cant wait to throw away water bottles and wrappers till they get to the top of the hill... another discussion.

okay i have lots more but thats enough for now
later
GREG

ps. anyone want to tell me how you aquire the waking up with some girl you dont know habbit?? I would even consider skiing with you to see if it rubs off. That just proves im in college huh...
post #15 of 23
I crash alot, sometimes really hard. Is that a bad thing?

I think I'll take a lesson this year.


Gear:
1994 K2 Xtreem Series w/salomon 747(207cm)
1989 Rossignol strato w/tyrolia free-flex(195cm)
1982 Rossignol rentalEDGE w/Poweraxe Race SL plate (135cm)
Head Standards w/ Metal binders (releasable)
some old SnowBlades I found in a dumpster
1982 Burton cruzer (rock skis)
1987 Salomon rear-entry (orange and yellow) Boots
post #16 of 23
whtmt- i don't completely understand this "snow blade practice." If you could go into more detail it would be greatly appreciaed.
I start out in the wedge at the begining of every season. I usually use the wedge for the upper part of the hill and then work my way into a parallel stance as i make my way down the hill. It only lasts for the firt day or so in the season. I also do the same with the first practice race coarses i run. Usually i stay in the wedge longer in coarse then when i'm freeskiing.
Mabye i need to go back to the basics more often to force myself to stay forward all the time.
post #17 of 23
OK, I do have a BAD HABIT that I will admit to.

When I finish a full day of skiing the bowls like at VAIL, and I am CRUSING back to the GONDOLA at Lions Head, and I see these LITTLE signs that say like SLOW.

I KEEP RIGHT ON GOING AND BUZZ-EM!

I HATE SLOW!

DISCLAIMER:
(do not do this at your HOME area, do not do this with a SEASONS PASS around your neck, do this ONLY when you FULLY expect that they will PULL YOUR TICKET! Oh and always smile be polite and say something like, GEE WAS I IN A TUCK, or WAS I REA:LLY GOING THAT FAST?)

That is what make it WORTH WHILE! hehehe

It is like Yesterday, I was riding my mountain bike, and I got a ticket for speeding! It is a badge of COURAGE! I did not know I could peddel that fast and NOW I HAVE PROOF!
post #18 of 23
lbrother1,

The snowblade practice is supposed to get you in a more balanced position because the snowblades are too short and will not allow huge leverage on the tails. However, I personally don't think it works for beginner/intermediate skiers. If anything, beginners/intermediates on skiboards/snowblades tend to ride on their heels even more (especially in nasty snow). It is a natural tendency for people to lean back in order to avoid speed or to avoid getting their ski shovels into the snow. Skiboards and snowblades tend to amplify this problem.

My suggestion is to take lessons and start experiencing the feeling of pressure on the boot tongue, flexing your ankles and having pressure along the entire foot sole (not just the heel). Try exercises such as pivot slips, edge sets, garlands, etc. An instructor can show you these and much more.

Back to skiboards. I have a pair (98 cm Lines with center mount) that I use occasionally. I do believe that it helps with my balance, but not in the way most people expect. Skiboards are far better at preventing over pressuring the tongues (which lots of old schoolers still do) than at preventing the dreaded back seat habit. When used properly (i.e. keep them on edge) skiboards will show you what it feels like to pressure with the arch of your foot. Too much forward pressure and you will over-load the relatively short shovel. Too much back seat action and the skiboard will start wobbling at speed. The right amount of for-aft pressure and the skiboards become quiet, fast, carving machines.

So remember that if you are just gliding along (as many beginners/intermediates do on skiboards), you will have a natural tendency to lean back, which will not help your skiing. Let me stress that I am not trying to dissuade you from using skiboards (or snowblades). On the contrary, you should try it, but be aware of their limitations and of the claims you hear about them. If you are an expert in-line skater, skiboards will be the most natural thing you have ever tried. You will do far better on them than many expert skiers who don't in-line skate and are on skiboards for the first time.
post #19 of 23
Dr.Go -- How about a whole pace line getting tickets.

Several years ago we were doing sprint practices in an industral park on a Sunday evening in January (No one around). The whole line was doing about 30 mph when we came around the corner and the sprint started. For the next 150 yards bikes seemed to be all over the place and wobbling from the power we were putting in and going for position. The cop pulled us all over and gave us speeding tickets (I guess we should not have passed him). I showed him my max of 39.5 and that's what I got the ticket for. He gave us a big lecture about reckless bike riding (I'm glad he never saw any races). I have that ticket framed and on my wall at home. I don't think he had ever seen bikes ridden like that before.

WAS
post #20 of 23
You know WAS, you bring up a good point.

A FAST LANE through these SLOW down areas.

What if there was a fast lane for those who SCOOT and then the rest of the SKIING PUBLIC could roll along their merry way with out getting in the way of those who FLY!

Sorry about the whole pace line getting tickets, wow that guy made QUOTA all in one stop! CAN YOU SAY DUNKIN DONUTS FOR A WEEK! 120 - 120 out
post #21 of 23
These backseat suggestion cures are great. I might submit this as to why beginners and intermediates sit back: fear.

consider this vicious circle... They start down a slope. They feel they're going to fast and and they lean back (seems like a natural reaction in order to get away from 'downhill'- you see this when people walk down a grassy slope in a park. They take small steps and lean back, away from the 'steepness'- this causes less pressure on the shoes and less square inches of shoe to ground contact- slipsville and down they go!) back to skiing- kind of the same thing. They are now in the backseat. This flatens the ski and brings the tips out of the snow. A flat ski goes faster. They get more fearful and sit back more. Now the ski is even flatter and faster. Soon they bail by sitting down and trying to turn and put their hand down to break the fall. Now we're talking ACL's and a sprained wrist or broken thumb! :

All of the above suggestions are right on the money. I might add that in general (saw this taught in my daughter's class) keep your body perpendicular to the ground and/or skis. Take your poles and cross them 90 degrees. The horizontal pole is the ground. The upper pole is you. Tilt the ground pole back and forth keeping the verticle pole at right angles. When I saw that I thought that was a neat way to get beginners or inters into the general position of good skiing. Once they do this they can work on refinements.

I once saw a poster of 'Whistler's Mother' sitting way back in her rocking chair with skis on and a grin. The caption was "SIT BACK MOTHER!" I wish I could find it. I'd make one, but I'm not that good with PhotoShop or the like.
post #22 of 23
Some techniques that I have found to be very successful for eliminating the backseat-syndrome in my students:

Place one thumbtack (pointy side up) in each ski boot, directly underneath the heel.

-or-

Get a three foot long piece of duct-tape. Stick one end to the skier’s forehead, run it over the top of their head, and stick the other end onto the middle of their back.
This prevents them from tilting their head down, eliminating the backseatedness AND the tip crossing.

This usually gets things fixed up pretty quickly.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ December 08, 2001 09:24 PM: Message edited 1 time, by Geoff' ]</font>
post #23 of 23
Thread Starter 
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Geoff':

Place one thumbtack (pointy side up) in each ski boot, directly underneath the heel.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Good ideas, all. I've found that fearing the "gunshot" sound of an ACL going off proves far more of an incentive for me to avoid the backseat!
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