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Ski fitness whilst travelling

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

I am skiing for 8 weeks next Jan and am travelling with my missus and 3 year old for 4 months at the back end of this year.

I probably won't have any access to gyms and equipment so wanted some advice guidance on exercising whilst I am travelling.

Thinking some daily stretching, running and some leg work in the main (squats, lunges and hill running)with some press ups, situps/crunches and some balance work (not sure what I can do though whilst travelling around)

Any thoughts.

Thanks,
Matt.
post #2 of 6
You can do simple balance exercises by practicing your squats on one leg, or by practicing your squats and lunges on a pillow. You can also do dynamic flexibility exercises on slope. One of these days I should video this, but here goes.

Hold each ski pole with each hand.
Step back until your back is flat. Your chest will be parallel to the snow.
Try to keep your upper back flat. Inhale to prepare
As you exhale, tilt your pelvis and round your lower back.
Do this about 8 times, or until your back feels relaxed.

Then

Push your hips to the left, and your ski poles to the right.
Return to center
Repeat on the other side

Have Fun!
post #3 of 6
Matt-The most versatile (and smallest) piece of exercise equipment that I own is the TRX Suspension System. It was designed by an ex Navy Seal to be used anywhere (even in the field when on active duty). You can get an incredible all-body workout with this system- and the whole thing packs in a pouch that is approx. 6X10X3 inches. I use it all the time-even when I travel.You can check it out on www.fitnessanywhere.com. Very ingenious system.
post #4 of 6
You can do crunches in a hotel room on an open floor. Lay on your back with your legs in a sitting position. Do a regular crunch and/or hands over the ears, elbow touch to opposite knee.

Another exercise you can do is wall sits. Stand with your back against the wall so that there is 90 degree bend at your knees (thighs parallel to the floor). Start by holding for 15-30 seconds and then extend to 2 minutes (feel the burn!). Extra credit if you vary the angle and more credit if you slide your back up and down against the wall (8-12 reps per set).

There's a yoga pose (I forget the name) where you stand on one leg with the rest of your body parallel to the floor, toes pointed and arms held "above" the head - palms touching (i.e. you are in a "T" position). Start with your support flexed a little, then stretch to stand as tall as you can. You'll probably have to let your hands split to maintain balance when you get started.
post #5 of 6

Less is definitely more!

Quote:
Originally Posted by patprof66 View Post
Matt-The most versatile (and smallest) piece of exercise equipment that I own is the TRX Suspension System. It was designed by an ex Navy Seal to be used anywhere (even in the field when on active duty). You can get an incredible all-body workout with this system- and the whole thing packs in a pouch that is approx. 6X10X3 inches. I use it all the time-even when I travel.You can check it out on www.fitnessanywhere.com. Very ingenious system.

The TRX is a great tool to have in the toolbox. We use the Jungle Gym I for our outdoor programs with lots of success. It may be use for many purposes, just like the TRX...however, the biggest difference is the cost (TRX about $150-$200 and Jungle Gyms I & II is $30-$80).

http://www.performbetter.com/detail....tegoryID_E_223

Either or would work...although with the savings on the jungle gyms -- you could put that towards some new gear for next year

Train Hard and Ski Harder!
The SNOtrainers
post #6 of 6

Heavyhands

I've found over the past 20+ years that Len Schwartz's Heavyhands method using small hand weights is excellent for ski-related as well as overall fitness, either when travelling or as a regular training approach. The movements adopted can be made quite skiing-specific (e.g. knee and ankle flexion, quad and hamstring strength, core strength and flexibility, tendon strength etc.) and in general the method can address strength, flexibility, aerobic-anaerobic capacity, and - to a lesser extent - balance issues as required.

David
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