or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Patrol Shack › First Aid/First responder web resources
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First Aid/First responder web resources

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
G'Day all

Just got an email from another patroller at my mountain which had some great input about early identifacation of Strokes (CVA)
I'll put the text in at the bottom

(I find the threads running about boot removal and tib/fib traction particulkarly interesting)

This got me thinking about how useful it would be in the off season to get updates and hints (for want of a better word) on variuos medical and trauma responses

So my question is do people know of any resources online or via mail-list that would be suitable to Ski Patrol?

They might have regular/irregular posts

Best

Simon
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 

the email I got!

Forgot to add the details of the email I got

...
STROKE IDENTIFICATION:

During a BBQ, a friend stumbled and took a little fall - she assured
everyone that she was fine (they offered to call paramedics) and that she
had just tripped over a brick because of her new shoes. They got her
cleaned up and got her a new plate of food. While she appeared a bit
shaken up, Ingrid went about enjoying herself the rest of the evening.
Ingrid's husband called later telling everyone that his wife had been taken
to the hospital - (at 6:00 pm, Ingrid passed away.) She had suffered a
stroke at the BBQ. Had they known how to identify the signs of a stroke,
perhaps Ingrid would be with us today. Some don't die. They end up in a
helpless, hopeless condition instead.

It only takes a minute to read this...

A neurologist says that if he can get to a stroke victim within 3 hours he
can totally reverse the effects of a stroke... totally!He said the trick
was getting a stroke recognized, diagnosed, and then getting the patient
medically cared for within 3 hours, which is tough.

RECOGNIZING A STROKE

Thank God for the sense to remember the "3" steps,S.T. R.. Read and Learn!

Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify. Unfortunately,
the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe
brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke.

Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple
questions:

S* Ask the individual to SMILE.

(If the smile is lopsided, a stroke is likely to have occured.)

T * Ask the person to TALKto SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE
(If the speech is slurred, a stroke is likely to have occured.)
(Coherently) (i.e. . . It is sunny out today)

R* Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

(If he or she cannot raise one arm, a stroke is likely to have occured.)

*NOTE: Another 'sign' of a stroke is this: Ask the person to 'stick' out
their tongue! If the tongue is 'crooked', if it goes to one side or the
other, that is also an indication of a stroke. If he or she has trouble
with ANY ONE of these tasks, call 911 immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

...
post #3 of 9
It sounds likely that the person in that story had a hemorrhagic stroke, which requires surgery rather than a drug to limit or reverse the damage. An Ischemic stroke can be treated with drugs that dissolve clots and thin the blood to prevent further strokes. Hospitals are becoming certified in different levels of stroke care much like trauma level certifications, it could be helpful to know which hospital in your area has the highest treatment level. Not all have access to the newest drugs.

Other tests for stroke are grip strength, a noticeable deficiency in one side could be a sign. Also, check arm drift, some people who have suffered a stroke can raise both arms but have difficulty keeping them even and in front of them.
post #4 of 9
And as far as forums for med info, I think this is a great place to bounce ideas around. We could start a new thread for different topics, it's not like this room is over-run with threads. I'm lucky enough to get training throughout the year but it's still hard to keep up with all of the latest trends on every subject.
post #5 of 9
http://www.medicalstudent.com/ is more of a general resource site but has links to various texts etc for free, can be useful.
post #6 of 9
Ski Patrolling is prehospital medicine.

EMS websites can be a great resource!

www.emtlife.com - active EMS web forum

www.fieldmedics.com - extremely professional and in-depth web forum

I also recommend furthering yourself by taking Biology and/or Anatomy and Physiology courses as well as upping your level of training. (If you are an OEC, become an EMT. If you are an EMT, take additional courses such as BTLS, PHTLS, PEPP, etc. Ask local agencies FD, EMS, or SAR if you may attend their weekly or monthly continuing education classes).
post #7 of 9

WFR courses...

My wife and I just finished taking a Wilderness First Responder course at SOLO, in Conway, NH. It was very interesting and informative.

In addition to SOLO, NOLS has their own WFR program, as do several other organizations. SOLO was the first, and their curriculum seems to be the basis for the other courses.
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks great resources

Hi great input guys

I think the emt courses sound great unfortunately I am in Australia and we don't have them here! I don't fancy becoming an ambo.

I am a nurse however and I still think (be great to get input here guys) that it is very different on the hill.

I don't see patients outside, wet, fully dressed when they have just fallen over when I am in my nice dry, sure footed, equipment stocked hospital.

Its different

Don't you think?

Simon
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by simonwoof View Post
Hi great input guys

I think the emt courses sound great unfortunately I am in Australia and we don't have them here! I don't fancy becoming an ambo.

I am a nurse however and I still think (be great to get input here guys) that it is very different on the hill.

I don't see patients outside, wet, fully dressed when they have just fallen over when I am in my nice dry, sure footed, equipment stocked hospital.

Its different

Don't you think?

Simon
Inside a hospital is way too easy. That takes all the fun out. Try to picture snow falling sideways, brutal cold, on steep solid blue ice slope (except for the one small snow mogul where the patient stopped), any you have to splint or worse spineboard the patient with your skis on. Why are your skis on you may ask. Well if you take your skis off you will slide down to the bottom. The best part of working outside is you just cover up the vomit with some snow.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Patrol Shack
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Patrol Shack › First Aid/First responder web resources