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MA Dutch in France

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am a hobby-skier, 45 years old. All the lessons I took were indoor on a kind of rolling carpet. I'll see if I can find a video of that, so that you can get an impression of what it looks like.

I was in Val Thorens in France last week. It was hot there, so the snow was slushy.
The first three runs you see were filmed on a slope qualified as "red".

The fourth an fifth run were filmed in january under perfect snowconditions on a "blue" run. The last run is some indoorskiing in the Netherlands.

I know some of my flaws, but I am curious what you guys think.

http://media.putfile.com/Ski-20062007
post #2 of 12
I'll let the expert chime in with valuable advices. What strikes me is that the movie demonstrate only one type of skiing (rather nicely done IMO). Is that a 'short turn special' or is that the way you always ski (maybe as a result of indoor training) ? If that"s the case, you're missing something : try longer turns, add variety !
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
I'll let the expert chime in with valuable advices. What strikes me is that the movie demonstrate only one type of skiing (rather nicely done IMO). Is that a 'short turn special' or is that the way you always ski (maybe as a result of indoor training) ? If that"s the case, you're missing something : try longer turns, add variety !
Most of the time I ski this way, probably as a result of my indoortraining, but I also ski longer turns at higher speeds. It depends on how crowded the slopes are.
I have just one type of ski: Atomic SL12pb.
I have been thinking about trying out something else.

As far as bumpskiing is involved: I am missing a lot!
Maybe next year I'll take bumpskiinglessons to become a more complete skier. We can't train that indoors.
post #4 of 12
How long are the skis? They seem really short . . . Nice turns for what you were doing I guess . . .
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattchuck2 View Post
How long are the skis? They seem really short . . . Nice turns for what you were doing I guess . . .
160 cm
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Despite the lack of response: the link http://media.putfile.com/Indoorski gives you an impression of how I practice in a country without any mountains. This is a clip from last year (a little late on an off the edges, I think..). I couldn't find something from this year.

The results of this form of training for snowskiing are visible in the link in the first post.
post #7 of 12
Here's what I see . If other more experienced instructors see differantly please correct.

You have a diverging outside ski. It looks like you are not pressuring it enough. You need to flex the inside ski and extend the outside one to apply more pressure to the outside ski through the apex of the turn. Try shuffling your feet through your turn to get off the inside ski more . Then try unloading the inside ski through the turn by lifting it. See what it feels like to first even out your pressure and next move the pressure to the outside ski and back as it reverses.
Move your hip forward and work on flexion and extension.Time your most extension of the outside ski to coincide with the apex. Flex the inside ski to it's most flexed position as you move to the bottom of the turn. Relax the outside ski to a flexed position to release and then start extending the new to be outside side to begin your turn and to change edges.
Don't use all your extension or flexion up. Leave room for movement either way to deal with terrain adjustments.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman View Post
Despite the lack of response: the link http://media.putfile.com/Indoorski gives you an impression of how I practice in a country without any mountains. This is a clip from last year (a little late on an off the edges, I think..). I couldn't find something from this year.

The results of this form of training for snowskiing are visible in the link in the first post.
That trainer is way cool . I like the way you get you on your edges. Maybe this is also why you ski over your inside ski so much. Your edging there is great . When you play with this try loading the outside much more and see what it feels like
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Here's what I see . If other more experienced instructors see differantly please correct.

You have a diverging outside ski. It looks like you are not pressuring it enough. You need to flex the inside ski and extend the outside one to apply more pressure to the outside ski through the apex of the turn. Try shuffling your feet through your turn to get off the inside ski more . Then try unloading the inside ski through the turn by lifting it. See what it feels like to first even out your pressure and next move the pressure to the outside ski and back as it reverses.
Move your hip forward and work on flexion and extension.Time your most extension of the outside ski to coincide with the apex. Flex the inside ski to it's most flexed position as you move to the bottom of the turn. Relax the outside ski to a flexed position to release and then start extending the new to be outside side to begin your turn and to change edges.
Don't use all your extension or flexion up. Leave room for movement either way to deal with terrain adjustments.
Thanks for your response. I think I understand what you mean. On the indoortrainer it sometimes is an issue. Amongst a lot of other things that constantly need attention, we have been working on putting more pressure on the outside ski and we have been doing exercises like you mention (lifting the inside ski).

On the snow I can imagine the picture you have in mind: the hips maybe a little lower, a more streched outside leg en a more flexed inside leg. Although I also would like it to look that way, it doesn't feel that I am not having enough pressure on the outside ski.
This is how it feels: I use my bodyweight to sort of fall onto the outside ski, I bend my knees and move my hips down. Then I release the ski (unweighting by streching up) and my legs move sort of weightless to the other side (it feels like a pause at which I don't do anything). Just a sequence of bending and releasing. I also have experienced that stretching out the legs also is a way of building up pressure followed by unweighting through flexing.

The slope was slushy. Because of all the pressure on the outside ski (sorry, that's how I felt it), it often dug itself in, while the inside ski was still moving forward. In at least one of the turns this is clearly visible. (Because of this experience I adjusted my way of skiing as I got down to the lower parts of the mountain, where the snow was a lot slushier. I moved my weight more evenly to both feet, used less pressure and less edgeangles and I sliced from edge tot edge very comfortably through it.)
When I was carving (the only difference with my normal skiing is that I take higher speeds and therefore greater angles, with the hips closer to the snow) I encountered the same problem with the outside ski: it dug itself in. When I look at the pictures of the turns I made, I would like the position of the legs more to be, like you described.

In the mornings the slopes were icy. It may sound weird to you, but I had a fantastic grip. I felt my outside ski slice into the surface. I must admit, I was very much focussed on standing on the outside ski.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
I guess, this picture proves what you're saying.

http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=5402993
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman View Post
Thanks for your response. I think I understand what you mean. On the indoortrainer it sometimes is an issue. Amongst a lot of other things that constantly need attention, we have been working on putting more pressure on the outside ski and we have been doing exercises like you mention (lifting the inside ski).

On the snow I can imagine the picture you have in mind: the hips maybe a little lower, a more streched outside leg en a more flexed inside leg. Although I also would like it to look that way, it doesn't feel that I am not having enough pressure on the outside ski.
This is how it feels: I use my bodyweight to sort of fall onto the outside ski, I bend my knees and move my hips down. Then I release the ski (unweighting by streching up) and my legs move sort of weightless to the other side (it feels like a pause at which I don't do anything). Just a sequence of bending and releasing. I also have experienced that stretching out the legs also is a way of building up pressure followed by unweighting through flexing.

The slope was slushy. Because of all the pressure on the outside ski (sorry, that's how I felt it), it often dug itself in, while the inside ski was still moving forward. In at least one of the turns this is clearly visible. (Because of this experience I adjusted my way of skiing as I got down to the lower parts of the mountain, where the snow was a lot slushier. I moved my weight more evenly to both feet, used less pressure and less edgeangles and I sliced from edge tot edge very comfortably through it.)
When I was carving (the only difference with my normal skiing is that I take higher speeds and therefore greater angles, with the hips closer to the snow) I encountered the same problem with the outside ski: it dug itself in. When I look at the pictures of the turns I made, I would like the position of the legs more to be, like you described.

In the mornings the slopes were icy. It may sound weird to you, but I had a fantastic grip. I felt my outside ski slice into the surface. I must admit, I was very much focussed on standing on the outside ski.
Feel encouraged by your progress. Hips not lower but more foreward.Over the middle of your feet. There are some really good things going on in your skiing. Nice roundish turns , good overall body position , hands in front.. A little more work and you will have it all going on nicely.The edging on the trainer showed high angles that can serve you well when you balance the pressure better.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman View Post
Thanks for your response. I think I understand what you mean. On the indoortrainer it sometimes is an issue. Amongst a lot of other things that constantly need attention, we have been working on putting more pressure on the outside ski and we have been doing exercises like you mention (lifting the inside ski).

On the snow I can imagine the picture you have in mind: the hips maybe a little lower, a more streched outside leg en a more flexed inside leg. Although I also would like it to look that way, it doesn't feel that I am not having enough pressure on the outside ski.
This is how it feels: I use my bodyweight to sort of fall onto the outside ski, I bend my knees and move my hips down. Then I release the ski (unweighting by streching up) and my legs move sort of weightless to the other side (it feels like a pause at which I don't do anything).
If you release the ski this way, you will have no pressure at the top of the turn. It makes it hard to have enough pressure on the outside ski when there is no pressure on the skis for half the turn. It also makes it very easy to twist the skis at the top of the turn. I don't know if you want to stop twisting the skis at the top of the turn or not, but if you do:

Release by flexing and tipping to the new edges. Extend/reach with your legs until you have full extension at the fall-line. Do not up unweight - stay low. At full extension, your outside foot should roll onto it's big toe edge all by itself. If it does not, you're not fully extended. NB. you may need a bit of speed before this happens.

You will find that you will have to experiment with the orientation of the path of your body and where it intersects the path of the skis.
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