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Ski on ice and clean carve with PMTS? - Page 8

post #211 of 224
Max, bit of a difference between "race coaching" (but not naming which racers, or their level) as claimed by some, and actually recently having retired from World Cup racing.

(also, HH may have the cheesy grin, but Emma looks a LOT better)
post #212 of 224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
Sean,

Is that a picture of you (post #154) in the red jacket & white helmet?

If so, I can believe you are a Level 8 skier, maybe even level 9.

I know it is only a photo, but that is good skiing!

JF
No Its just part of the web site.
post #213 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
Max, bit of a difference between "race coaching" (but not naming which racers, or their level) as claimed by some, and actually recently having retired from World Cup racing.
Hey, I'm not saying there is anything wrong with receiving instruction from a WC athlete (recently retired or not). However, if you guys think HH is out of the loop you are way off base.
post #214 of 224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell View Post
Hi Sean and welcome to EpicSki. I know and greatly respect Phil Smith, and if he has classified you as an "8.5", I certainly trust his judgement. It may be that you are a much faster learner than some on this site give you credit for.

I don't know much about PMTS, but it appears to me to be a system of ski-teaching, based predominantly on racing technique, ie. carving. (Although the lead proponent (Harald Harb), appears to favour a narrower stance than most modern racers. I must emphasise that I base this observation purely on his photos and videos, and I have never seen this Harb person ski, nor met him.)

Someone who I do know very well is Emma C-A; she was my team-mate during the early 1990s. I would recommend that you continue working with Emma, as she retired from World Cup as recently as 2003, and is therefore able to demonstrate a much more up-to-date version of racing (= carving) technique than Harb.

You stated that you are a visual learner. An excellent study resource I can recommend is http://www.ronlemaster.com

I did use some NLP during my ski-racing career, with the help of a practitioner called David Crago. Do you know him? He certainly helped me to a certain extent, although at that stage of my career, my greatest opponent was Father Time
Hi Martin

Thank you for the welcome. I did a lot of research before I booked my 2nd weeks skiing instruction, I booked with snoworks because as I said I want to ski the whole mountain.

Emma had just given birth to twins in February (Boys) and was teaching a level 5 group, 3 of them were also skiing in my group, they spoke very very highly of Emma's teaching indeed.

Thanks for the link I will check him out.

I do not know of David, does he specialise in skiing?

Hypnotherapy/NLP is a major learning tool used correctly.

Unbelievably its taken me until 53 to start skiing! Even though I used to watch you racing whenever you were on TV, who knows maybe Father Time is the driving force behind me
post #215 of 224
I have had the privelage for the last few seasons, to be able to coach a group of talented young ladies in the art of skiing. This season I had a consistant group of 4, ranging in age from 16 to 22 years old. All of them are former olympic caliber, nationally & internationally ranked athletes in another sport. The youngest had only 5 days total (about 18 hours) on skis when she came to me. We skied together for about 6 weeks. 3 to 5 hours a day 4 to 6 days a week. Within 2 weeks (about another 30 hours), I would say she was at this level description...

Advanced: Low Level 8: Very good parallel form, understands mechanics of the turn, very good upper and lower body separation, weights and un-weights skis, upper body faces down fall line, skis “cross” or “swing” under body, can make carved connected railroad tracks by keeping both skis on edge throughout the turn on all groomed trails in all conditions at high speed, has good athleticism and conditioning, is challenged by several off-piste disciplines, can ski off-piste at this level on the Hardest Blacks in slightly less than ideal conditions.

We didn't get to ski a lot of powder or bumps, but when we did she was making quick progress. Her basic technique on the grommed & with a little more mileage in easy bumps, would have her passing the PSIA LII skiing exam IMHO.

So yes given the right circumstances, attitude, natural ability & oppurtunity, I would say someone can reach the advanced stage of skiing in 50 hours. Not me by any means, I've skied about 15,000 to 20,000 hours & I still have a hard time with Open Parrallel!
JF
post #216 of 224
4ster I think you are being too humble. 15-20,000 hrs. should make you a High level 8 or Low Expert. That's about 30-35 years of skiing,yes?
post #217 of 224
47 years total, but only consistantly for the last 30 or so...
No problem with steeps, ice, powder, crud, bumps etc..

It's just those damn open parallels that get me!

JF
post #218 of 224
Upon researching numbered ski levels, I would surmize that I am still partly a Level 5 skier.

I forgot to mention the importance of a proper equipment set-up, alignment, tuning & fit are to rapid skill development!
JF
post #219 of 224
Max 501, I apologize if I implied that Harald Harb was "out of the loop". To be honest, I am a little "out of the loop" of the WC circuit myself (last January was my first time back on the tour, now with the media, for 12 years), so I am not totally up-to-date, regarding who is coaching which team.

UnSean, better late than never, good luck with your skiing!
post #220 of 224
unSean,

Quote:
Would you clarify "stronger directional movements"?

Sorry I haven't responded sooner. Drectional movements in skiing refer to moving the CM (center of mass) either toward the desired direction of movement, or toward a new direction of movement. It is done by moving your hips diagionally toward the direction you want to travel along with flexing into the sides of the tongues of the boots. This causes your body to move first and the feet follow to stay in balance. This is not much different from directional movements we make every day while walking around corners, the difference is that the feet are now sliding instead of walking to keep up with our body movements.

I hope this makes sence to you. It is a little different from the movements that most skiers use. They guide with their feet and balance over them. Using strong directional movements guides with the body, which is transmitted by flexing into the tongue of the boots and pulling the feet along. Inside foot guides, and outside foot is weight bearing (oooh, that was the answer to another reciently closed thread).

RW
post #221 of 224
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post
unSean,



Sorry I haven't responded sooner. Drectional movements in skiing refer to moving the CM (center of mass) either toward the desired direction of movement, or toward a new direction of movement. It is done by moving your hips diagionally toward the direction you want to travel along with flexing into the sides of the tongues of the boots. This causes your body to move first and the feet follow to stay in balance. This is not much different from directional movements we make every day while walking around corners, the difference is that the feet are now sliding instead of walking to keep up with our body movements.

I hope this makes sence to you. It is a little different from the movements that most skiers use. They guide with their feet and balance over them. Using strong directional movements guides with the body, which is transmitted by flexing into the tongue of the boots and pulling the feet along. Inside foot guides, and outside foot is weight bearing (oooh, that was the answer to another reciently closed thread).

RW
Ok Thanks Ron,

But I do have a problem with this moving the body, and not the feet, as I tried that and nothing happened, I feel that the movement must come from the feet first as they are grounded and then move through the thighs to the hips, although you sense that you want to move the hips it must surly start in the feet?

Sean
post #222 of 224
Sean, try this (either on snow or even where you are now)...
Stand up. move your hips to one side, now move them to the other.
On snow (try it at Castleford or MK)... stand facing across the slope, with your hips in their normal position. (make sure you've got poles with you)
Now, while still standing still, move your body down the slope - so your hips pass over your skis, and end up "lower" down the slope. That will take you from your uphill edges to your downhill edges.
(OK, I could be completely wrong about that exercise, but it shows the concept of moving the body while keeping the feet in the same spot.)
post #223 of 224
Sean,

Wear The Fox Hat has the right idea.

Quote:
But I do have a problem with this moving the body, and not the feet, as I tried that and nothing happened, I feel that the movement must come from the feet first as they are grounded and then move through the thighs to the hips, although you sense that you want to move the hips it must surly start in the feet?
This is a movement that I instill in beginning skiers, but is not that much of a natural movement for a lot of people. It takes time (milage) to develope in skiing.

RW
post #224 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by raj View Post

Sean you are posting this question on the wrong forum. The correct place to get your "balanced" answer is Teton Gravity Research. Folks here are being too harsh on a new comer like you. You will find TGR to be a much more friendly site for new comers with these technical questions. You will get on the spot coaching with no trash talk. You have become an advanced 8.5 level skier after 50 hrs = 1 week of skiing. Some may doubt that but I don't. The woman who skied Everest this year (icy steeps = similar conditions you are skiing in teh Alps) was probably pretty close in experience to you. I know dogs have skied Mt Hood (my local mountain) after watching their owners for a couple of days, so it can be done.


The skis you are using are wrong for the job. They have too much sidecut and are too slow. You ned to get a Volkl Explosiv in a 190 or a Nordica FF9.1 in a 190 with a sidecut radius of ~ 40 m. The longer radius will let you carry much more speed. When you approach the speed of light, space will shrink and in your reference frame, there will be enough time to make the carved turns with no skidding. No big deal, should take you about 1 one more day of coaching at your fast learning pace before it becomes part of conscious competence.


But the most important thing to do is to post your question on TGR. You will get friendly adn voluminous advice. Good luck

Strong work, did this JONG post on TGR?
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