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emergency gear/auto

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Since it's that time of year, when we migrate through the worst (read as best, hopefully), conditions, what kind of survival goodies have you put into the trusty (sure!) vee-hikle?

I know I forgot something but here's what I came up with.

Tow Strap
Tire pump
Fix-a-flat can
Duct tape
Siphon
Jumpers
Flares and Cyalumes (liquid)
Anti Ice Spray + small size for ski bag (to get into auto)
Small tool selection
Gloves & junk poncho
Flashlight
Bottle of water and a bag of the halloween candy you don't like.

So, what did I forget? :

I did see an emergency battery with attached leads to give you a jump. Neat thing, just larger than a lap top, has anyone used one of these?

[ November 25, 2002, 06:27 AM: Message edited by: yuki ]
post #2 of 25
You forgot the most important thing1 four snow tires.

John
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
95' 4X Exploder w new Michelin M&S ....... sadly, my old Toyota 4X, the official "Truck of the Taliban", was given to a friend in need of work wheels. The XC, now does "family hack" duty.
post #4 of 25
Lets not forget good driving sense. Going that "extra" 10 kph just might not get you there that much quicker.
post #5 of 25
Yuki:

I would also add chains to that list even if you have 4WD. Another item that I carry to help others is a slim jim. If you are ever travelling with a big group to say soccer games or in connection with ski racing, someone always seem to manage to lock their keys in the car. Regarding the "jump starter" question, I have had one of those units for over three years now and have found it to be extremely handy. Although I carry jumper cables as well, it has helped me start my own car without having to flag someone down. For a while I had a streak of three batteries that shorted out after six months or so. All were replaced under warrantee, but I finally got my money back and got another brand. On several occations I have helped skiers in the parking lot by just hooking up the jusmp starter. In a few cases, it would have been impossible to push the car with only a few people due to the snow. Either wait for a lot of people, the owner of the car parlked next to you or tow it out. In either case, the car started in a couple of minutes.
post #6 of 25
shovel
post #7 of 25
Avy shovel to dig my Jeep out of the parking lot on big snow days.

Sleeping bag when heavy snow is forecasted for the day. You never know when your going to be stuck at the ski area for the night.

Other than that, not really anything.
post #8 of 25
cell phone
post #9 of 25
Winter survival is something most people don't take seriously enough , alot think it won't happen to them or they can handle what could happen . Heres the catch, most have no idea what to do , or how fast it can get real serious if your in the middle of nowhere.
I have the pleasure of coming across stranded motorists on a regular basis being in a rural area and believe me most aren't even close to ready.
The above posts have most of the gear and supplies needed but they have missed candles, candles and a good sleeping bag can save your life. Candles put out an icredible amount of heat when on the floor of a truck. There are survival candles made for this purpose , some have a wick thats about 1/4 inch so they put out more heat. One last thing to add is gas line antifreeze.
post #10 of 25
In California, Chains are required by law.
Also Slim Jim's are banned by law in Calif. Not sure about other states. You must have a "permit" to purchase or carry one. FYI
post #11 of 25
Backup battery operated radio, (with weather band is nice)
Extra batteries for flashlight/radio. Check them regularly.
post #12 of 25
I allways carry a well stocked Emergency Medical Kit with extra rubber gloves, thermal blankets, etc. Enough so you could help control an accident with multiple people injured if you come upon one. I would also suggest that anyone doing alot of winter travel take at least an Emergency First Responder course. You will more than likely come upon an accident that you could be of assistance at.
post #13 of 25
One more item to add to the list. Kitty litter can get you out if you get stuck.
post #14 of 25
A blanket. It could be a while before AAA finds you overheated on the highway...
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Pow Junkie:
I allways carry a well stocked Emergency Medical Kit with extra rubber gloves, thermal blankets, etc. Enough so you could help control an accident with multiple people injured if you come upon one. I would also suggest that anyone doing alot of winter travel take at least an Emergency First Responder course. You will more than likely come upon an accident that you could be of assistance at.
Rubber Gloves - for that emergency proctological exam you may need to do? Just kidding Pow, just kidding.

Mark
post #16 of 25
"MOOOON RIVER!!
You using you whole hand there doc?"

Fletch-
post #17 of 25
"MOOOON RIVER!!
You using your whole hand there doc?"

Fletch-
post #18 of 25
An emergency med kit is good thing to have. These people have kits that fit in a pocket all the way up to expedition size. Something to think on.
med kits
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Leeroy:
Winter survival is something most people don't take seriously enough , alot think it won't happen to them or they can handle what could happen . Heres the catch, most have no idea what to do , or how fast it can get real serious if your in the middle of nowhere.
I have the pleasure of coming across stranded motorists on a regular basis being in a rural area and believe me most aren't even close to ready.
The above posts have most of the gear and supplies needed but they have missed candles, candles and a good sleeping bag can save your life. Candles put out an icredible amount of heat when on the floor of a truck. There are survival candles made for this purpose , some have a wick thats about 1/4 inch so they put out more heat. One last thing to add is gas line antifreeze.
Nix on candles in enclosed spaces like a vehicle due to carbon monoxide. Same for any kind of flame except for an alcohol fueled setup. (70% rubbing alchohol with NO fragrance additives, and a 1 pound coffe can with an uncored TP roll stuffed inside makes a safe heat source).
post #20 of 25
I'd hate to see you miss out 'cause you forgot these.
Go get em!

[IMG] http://store4.yimg.com/I/theaccessgroup_1735_585529 [/IMG]

[ April 14, 2003, 06:10 PM: Message edited by: BadRat ]
post #21 of 25
Soft TP in a plastic ziplock bag. You never know...
post #22 of 25
Fire extinguisher
Hammer to bust out windows (better n' a slim jim, don't need no stinkin' permit neither) or one of these, Life Hammer
Sand
Lots of flares, most last only 15 to 20 minutes.
Boots, don't want to walk too far in boat shoes in a snow storm.
post #23 of 25
Cell phone?
post #24 of 25
1. Corkscrew
2. Breath mints
3. Corkscrew safety storeage device. (I find a securely placed cork is ideal for that)(I have discovered that the easiest way to have a secure cork is to ensure it is mounted in a glass 'cork holder')(Without doubt, the best glass cork holders are green) (For the sake of balance it is best to ensure that the green glass cork holder is filled with liquid)(The best liquid to be in a green glass cork holder needs to be in the region of 12-14% alcohol, to maintain equilibrium)(many countries in the world produce these, although my preference is for ones made in the Rhone valley in France.)



S
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Wear the fox hat:
..although my preference is for ones made in the Rhone valley in France.)



S
Bah, tastes. :
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